Hep B Blog

Sexual Transmission and Hepatitis B Among Adults in China

As the birth-dose for hepatitis B (HBV) increases, sexual transmission is the most common mode of transmitting hepatitis B among unvaccinated adults. A research study, “Evaluating the independent influence of sexual transmission on HBV infection in China: a modeling study” evaluated the independent impact of sexual transmission on hepatitis B. This blog will give a summary of the results of the study, prevention tips, and future recommendations.

Summary of Research Study

 The researchers of this study developed an age- and sex-specific discrete model at the population level to evaluate the influence of sexual transmission on HBV infection in China. They found that in 2014, due to sexual transmission, the total number of chronic HBV infections in people aged 0–100 years increased by 292,581 people! That year, due to sexual transmission, there were  189,200 new chronic infections among men and 103,381 new chronic infections among women. In 2006, sexual transmission accounted for 24.76% (male: 31.33%, female: 17.94%) of acute HBV infections in China and in 2014, sexual transmission accounted for 34.59% (male: 42.93%, female: 25.73%) of acute HBV infections in China. These statistics demonstrate that acute HBV infections due to sexual transmission increased by 10% and 8% respectively from 2006-2014.

However, researchers found that if the condom usage rate increased by 10% annually starting in 2019, then compared with current practice, the total number of acute HBV infections from 2019 to 2035 would be reduced by 16.68% (male: 21.49%, female: 11.93%). The HBsAg prevalence in people aged 1–59 years in 2035 would be reduced to 2.01% (male: 2.40%, female: 1.58%).

Prevention and Harm Reduction Strategies During Sex

 Practicing safe sex is can be a great way to prevent the transmission of hepatitis B. Condoms are an effective way to prevent the transmission of hepatitis B during intercourse. Sometimes during sex, people like to use personal lubricants. When using condoms it is important to remember to only use silicone or water-based lubricant. Oil-based lubricants increase the chance of ripping or tearing the condom. It is highly recommended if someone is living with hepatitis B to have sex with a condom, however, if you are having sex without a condom, certain sexual activities are far more efficient at spreading hepatitis B than others. Oral sex appears to have a lower rate of hepatitis B transmission than vaginal sex. Anal sex carries a very high risk of transmission because tears in the skin can occur during penetration, allow more transmission routes for the virus.

Recommendations

If you have never been vaccinated for hepatitis B, it is recommended that you receive the vaccination. The hepatitis B vaccine is a safe and effective vaccine that is recommended for all infants at birth and for children up to 18 years. Since everyone is at some risk, all adults should seriously consider getting the hepatitis B vaccine for lifetime protection against preventable chronic liver disease. The hepatitis B vaccine is also known as the first “anti-cancer” vaccine because it prevents hepatitis B, the leading cause of liver cancer worldwide.

If you think you might be at increased risk for hepatitis B infection, is also recommended you get tested for hepatitis B. Hepatitis B is known as the” silent” infection, meaning you could be infected with the virus and not show symptoms that can cause long-term liver damage. If you have not been tested for hepatitis B and would like to know your status, you should get in contact with your primary care provider. Your physician should order a panel of three blood tests for the hepatitis B panel:

  1. HBsAg (hepatitis B surface antigen)
  2. Anti-HBs or HBsAb (hepatitis B surface antibody)
  3. anti-HBc or HBcAb (hepatitis B core antibody)

The results of all 3 blood test results are needed in order to make a diagnosis. Be sure to request a printed copy of your blood tests so that you fully understand which tests are positive or negative, and what your hepatitis B status is.

If you know you have had unprotected sexual intercourse with someone living with hepatitis B, there is something called post-exposure treatment. If an uninfected, unvaccinated person – or anyone who does not know their hepatitis B status – is exposed to the hepatitis B virus through contact with infected blood, a timely “postexposure prophylaxis” (PEP) can prevent infection and subsequent development of chronic infection or liver disease. This means a person should seek immediate medical attention (within 72 hours of exposure) to start the hepatitis B vaccine series. In some circumstances, a drug called “hepatitis B immune globulin” (HBIG) is recommended in addition to the hepatitis B vaccine for added protection.

 

Author: Evangeline Wang

Contact Information: info@hepb.org

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