Hep B Blog

Category Archives: Liver

CHIPO Partner Highlight: Great Lakes Peace Centre

 The Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO) is a national community coalition that is co-founded and led by the Hepatitis B Foundation, comprised of organizations and individuals who are interested in addressing the high rates of hepatitis B infection among African communities in the US. Recently, CHIPO has started to expand its reach to communities in Africa and has welcomed new partners from the Continent. This month, in honor of Minority Health Month, we highlight a partnership between CHIPO and Great Lakes Peace Centre (GLPC) in Kasese, Uganda. CHIPO has recently provided GLPC with educational resources that are tailored for African communities, which GLPC is translating into local dialects and will use in a strategy to raise awareness and provide education about hepatitis B, primarily to rural women and youth in Kasese District. A recent interview with Bwambale Arafat, Head of Health and Policy Officer at GLPC, sheds light on some of the significant barriers that impede hepatitis B screening, prevention, and care in Uganda (and much of the African continent) and showcases some of the extraordinary work of GLPC on a host of issues, of which viral hepatitis is just one.

 CHIPO: Can you share a little bit about yourself? What is your connection to hepatitis?

Arafat: I work with the Great Lakes Peace Centre, which is a grassroots, youth-led organization, here in Kasese District, a rural area in Rwenzori region, western Uganda (near the border of the Democratic Republic of Congo, about 400 kilometers from the capital city of Kampala). Most of our work with hepatitis B is focused on raising awareness and providing education about the virus to women and youth in the area, who are the most important people to reach. We also engage in a lot of advocacy initiatives, as well as efforts to lower stigma and discrimination.

My personal connection to hepatitis B is the diagnosis of my uncle with hepatitis B and liver cancer and his death shortly thereafter. There was widespread misconception that he had been bewitched and poisoned by relatives. I have been working to try to dispel some of these myths and provide accurate information ever since. In 2021, I was honored as a World Hepatitis Alliance champion for hepatitis outreach work during COVID-19. I and GLPC are deeply committed to the cause of hepatitis B elimination by the year 2030.

CHIPO: Congratulations on the well-deserved honor! Can you share a bit about the work and goals of your organization?

Arafat: Due to its proximity to the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kasese feels the effects of war and conflict acutely, and the area is quite fragile. Peace and Conflict Resolution is the first of three priority areas for GLPC and is driven forward by the efforts and demographic dividends of young people. Health Promotion and Public Policy is the second priority area, which encompasses awareness and education about hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, malaria, and tuberculosis prevention, screening, and treatment, as well as nutrition assessments, counseling, and support, especially for mothers of children under five years of age. Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene is another topic of top concern, and initiatives in this sector included a hand-washing campaign for COVID-19. The last focus area under the Health Promotion umbrella is adolescent sexual and reproductive health, and especially promotion of education equity for menstruating young women and ending of stigma and discrimination around this, thus keeping young women in school for longer. Social empowerment happens through education, and people can donate to keep girls in school with financial support. The third organizational priority is to focus on climate change – GLPC distributes solar panels through public and private partnerships, as a great step toward sustainability and protecting the planet we share.

 CHIPO: What are some of the biggest barriers to hepatitis screening, prevention, and care in your community?

Arafat: As I mentioned above, the widespread presence of myths and misconceptions about hepatitis B, especially about transmission, is one of the biggest culprits in perpetuating the stigma and discrimination that still dominate the hepatitis B conversation and presents one of the biggest challenges to increasing screening and vaccination. Some ways that we are working to dispel some of these misconceptions are through our social media platforms, which all have huge followings by younger people. However, attitudes are very slow to change, and this is why the involvement of religious and community leaders in spreading accurate information and shifting the narrative around viral hepatitis is so important, and why personal testimonials and connections with people who are living with hepatitis B hold such power.

Other challenges to screening, prevention, management, and treatment of hepatitis B in Kasese include the enormous out-of-pocket costs of diagnosis and testing; the persistent lack of awareness among the general population – primarily lack of information, education, and communication; the lack of logistics and supplies for things like test kits and cold chain storage for vaccines; and the long distances and mountainous topography that make access to health facilities in larger cities difficult. Additionally, funding and resources from the government and other stakeholders remain inadequate, making it difficult to ensure that services will be available when they are needed. The Minister of Health and government of Uganda have created infrastructure to help with vaccination (they have provided 1 million USD for this reason), have recommended universal adult vaccination, and have also waived fees for viral load investigation. However, things like ultrasound scans, complete blood count panels, and other tests to determine when someone would need treatment for hepatitis are not subsidized. The government could also do a great deal more in terms of increasing awareness, investing money into management and care, prioritizing the birth dose of the vaccine to prevent mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B, and addressing the stigma and discrimination so many living with hepatitis B routinely face.

Many infants also continue to be delivered by traditional birth attendants, who are not trained in preventing mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B, and knowledge among community health workers in general is very low. There is also inadequate data and surveillance of the disease, and no records of screening, vaccination, or care are kept in the Health Management and Information System. There is a lack of clear guidelines around testing for the medical community and a lack of materials that can help to raise awareness and combat stigma.

We also really need to integrate hepatitis services into those that exist for HIV/AIDS. Machines that are used to test for HIV/AIDS can be recalibrated to also test for hepatitis. Electronic Health Records can be upgraded to include hepatitis B status. As awareness grows, patients can also hold health workers accountable for hepatitis testing, as they do now for HIV and syphilis. This conversation needs to start with the people themselves.

 CHIPO: How are you planning to use CHIPO’s materials and resources over the next year?

Arafat: We have a saying in Kasese: “When you talk in a foreign language, you talk to people’s heads. When you speak in their language, you speak to their hearts.” Our first priority is to translate CHIPO’s flip charts, takeaway cards, and guides for health educators into our local dialects of Lhukonzo and Runyakitara, in order to reach as many community members and stakeholders as possible. We will host four community educational events using the materials and in these events, will focus on hepatitis B overview, causes and prevention, common myths and misconceptions, and unmet needs in this area. These sessions will be moderated by NoHep Champions and Hepatitis Ambassadors, so that the community can hear from people with direct experiences of the disease and their voices can be amplified.

Additionally, we will host NoHep Champion Table Talks, which are informal discussions that will consist of young people living with HBV and pregnant women, who will share stories and build community. These talks will touch upon how people are doing physically, as well as with handling stigma, and will identify needed services, insights which can help to determine future programming and practices. These talks will also emphasize that no one is alone, and that hepatitis B is not a death sentence, but that people with HBV can live long and healthy lives. We will also convene community barazas (gatherings) with local leaders, including social workers, health workers, village health teams, hepatitis ambassadors, local council, and cultural, community, and religious leaders to conduct trainings on delivery of the educational materials. These will provide an opportunity to educate and invite open discussion. We will also hold continuing education courses on hepatitis B for healthcare professionals at health facilities, including community health workers, village health teams, and para-social workers. Finally, we are planning to compose a radio jingle related to hepatitis B that will be heard around the district.

Only 1 in 10 people in Kasese know their hepatitis B status. These materials can go a long way in changing that.

CHIPO: Thank you so much for your valuable insights and for all of the work you are doing! Do you have any final thoughts or messages that you would like to share?

Arafat: I would just like to mention our No Hep Mamas campaign, which we are also implementing for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis B. We are working to bring this campaign to more health facilities, and share this information in prenatal care settings, as stopping the cycle of transmission is truly the best way to eliminate hepatitis B.

CHIPO: Thank you so much again for your time today, Arafat, and we look forward to more inspiring work from you in the future!

Arafat: Thank you very much!

Your Environment and Your Liver

October is Liver Cancer Awareness Month! This month let’s celebrate your liver for all it does for your body! This blog post will talk about how your environment, where you live, work, and play, affect your liver.

A healthy functioning liver (no advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis) is busy and effectively manages toxins daily. If your body was an automobile, your liver would be considered the engine. It does hundreds of vital things to make sure everything runs smoothly. Some of the most important functions of the liver include:

  • Stores vitamins, sugar, and iron to help give your body energy.
  • Controls the production and removal of cholesterol.
  • Clears your blood of waste products, drugs, and other poisonous substances.
  • Makes clotting factors to stop excessive bleeding after cuts or injuries.
  • Makes immune factors and removes bacteria from the blood to fight infection.
  • Releases a substance called “bile” to help digest food and absorb nutrients

How Does Lifestyle Affect My Liver?

Eating healthy for your liver is so important! The Hepatitis B Foundation encourages all people living with hepatitis B to eat a healthy diet, get regular exercise, and incorporate healthy habits in their day-to-day life. Some suggestions include:

Diet Changes

  • Avoid drinking alcohol and smoking since both will hurt your liver, which is already being injured by the hepatitis B virus.
  • Eat a healthy diet of fruit, whole grains, fish and lean meats, and a lot of vegetables. “Cruciferous vegetables” in particular — cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower — have been shown to help protect the liver against environmental chemicals.
  • Limit foods and drinks with added sugars including sodas, fruit juices, desserts, packaged snacks, and other foods that contain added sugar. Limit foods containing saturated fats including fatty cuts of meat and foods fried in oil.
  • Avoid eating raw or undercooked shellfish (e.g. clams, mussels, oysters, scallops) because they could be contaminated with a bacteria called Vibrio vulnificus, which is very toxic to the liver and could cause a lot of damage.
  • Check for signs of mold on nuts, maize, corn, groundnut, sorghum, and millet before using these foods. Mold is more likely to be a problem if food is stored in damp conditions and not properly sealed. If there is mold, then the food could be contaminated by “aflatoxins,” which are a known risk factor for liver cancer.

Household Changes

  • Avoid inhaling fumes from paint, paint thinners, glue, household cleaning products, nail polish removers, and other potentially toxic chemicals that could damage your liver.

Personal Care Changes

  • Wearing makeup is sometimes part of our everyday life or used on occasion. We can absorb products through our skin and into the liver. Sometimes makeup products that are applied to the facial area (high absorption area) contain harmful chemicals to your liver. People living with hepatitis B should look on labels for these 4 ingredients which are toxic to your liver.
  1. Phthalates including di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and di(2-ehtylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP)
  2. Lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium laureth sulfate (SLES)
  3. Diethanolamine (DEA), triethanolamine (TEA), amonoethanolamine (MEA)
  4. Propylene / butylene glycol (PG)

Ultimately, making healthy decisions about your liver is up to you. There will always be risks associated with different things you put in or on your body; it is your choice to outweigh these risks vs. benefits for yourself.

References:

 

Author: Evangeline Wang

Contact Information: info@hepb.org

The Importance of Liver Surveillance

October is Liver Cancer Awareness Month! This blog will discuss the importance of liver surveillance if you are living with hepatitis B.

Hepatitis B as a Major Risk Factor for Liver Cancer

Although liver cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the world, it is the second most common cause of cancer deaths. Many people do not realize that chronic hepatitis B is the primary global risk factor for developing liver cancer. Certain viruses, including hepatitis B, can cause hepatitis, which translates to “inflammation of liver.” The virus attacks the liver and weakens its ability to perform important tasks like filtering toxins from your blood and maintaining the level of sugar in your blood. Chronic (long-term) infection with hepatitis B or hepatitis C viruses can lead to liver cancer. Worldwide, hepatitis B is very widespread, making it a priority when it comes to the prevention of liver cancer. Approximately 292 million people around the world are living with hepatitis B.

Why Should I be Screened?

 Early detection of liver cancer can save lives! Regular screening for liver cancer and early detection are the most effective ways to improve treatment success and survival rates. Early detection of liver cancer results in more treatment options, which greatly improves the chances of survival after initial diagnosis. For patients in whom liver cancer is detected at an early stage and before symptoms occur – while the tumor is small and can be surgically removed – the 5-year survival rate can sometimes be more than 50%. This is why regular liver cancer screening is so important.

If you have cirrhosis or other known risk factors for liver cancer, make sure your health care provider screens you for liver cancer during your medical visits. Finding the cancer early may increase the chance of successful treatment. Your health care provider may refer you to a hepatologist, a doctor who specializes in liver diseases. Hepatologists have the most experience in managing chronic hepatitis B and C infections, including regular screening for liver cancer.

How Often Should I be Screened?

Liver cancer screening can be done as part of your regular visit to the health care provider who manages your hepatitis B. The American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) recommends that liver cancer screening include ultrasound of the liver every 6 months. If you are living with hepatitis B and are not getting screened every 6 months for liver cancer, you should ask your healthcare provider to start!

Listen and Learn!

The Hepatitis B Foundation’s podcast B Heppy has an episode out: Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B. In this episode, they chat with Dr. Kenneth Rothstein of University of Pennsylvania about the relationship between liver cancer and hepatitis B. He gives insight into herbal medicines, treatment options, liver surveillance, and important questions patients should ask their healthcare provider. Listen for more: https://bheppy.buzzsprout.com

 

 

Author: Evangeline Wang

Contact Information: info@hepb.org

October is Liver Cancer Awareness Month!

October marks the start of Liver Cancer Awareness Month! This month let’s celebrate your liver for all it does for your body!


Action Alert: Urge ACIP to Recommend Universal Hepatitis B Vaccination for Adults in the US

universal hepatitis B recommendation for adults is critical in addressing the consistently low adult hepatitis B vaccination rates and eliminating viral hepatitis in the United States. Tell the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) that universal adult hepatitis is essential to preventing liver cancer.  Take action here.


What Does Your Liver Do?

The liver is such an important organ – it’s like the engine of your body. It does hundreds of vital things to make sure everything runs smoothly:

  • Stores vitamins, sugar, and iron to help give your body energy
  • Controls the production and removal of cholesterol
  • Clears your blood of waste products, drugs, and other poisonous substances
  • Makes clotting factors to stop excessive bleeding after cuts or injuries
  • Produces immune factors and removes bacteria from the bloodstream to combat infection
  • Releases a substance called “bile” to help digest food and absorb important nutrients

The Link Between Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B  

The most common type of liver cancer is “primary liver cancer” or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Worldwide, the most common risk factor for primary liver cancer is chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus. Chronic viral hepatitis infections (hepatitis B and hepatitis C) cause about 80% of all liver cancers. Obesity, heavy alcohol use, fatty liver disease (NAFLD or NASH), and some metabolic disorders also increase the risk for primary liver cancer. People chronically infected with hepatitis B are more likely to develop liver cancer than uninfected people because the virus directly and repeatedly attacks the liver. These attacks over time can lead to increased liver damage, cirrhosis (scarring of the liver), and ultimately, liver cancer. People who have chronic hepatitis B can reduce their risk of liver cancer through regular medical monitoring, taking antiviral treatment if necessary, and making healthy lifestyle changes.

The best way to prevent liver cancer is to prevent hepatitis B infection! This is why hepatitis B vaccination is so important. When someone gets vaccinated to protect them from getting hepatitis B, they are also preventing liver cancer!

How Would I Know if I Have Liver Cancer?

If you have chronic hepatitis B, make sure you are getting routine surveillance for liver cancer every 6 months with your healthcare provider. This surveillance, which includes a combination of blood tests and liver imaging (ultrasound) is so important because early detection of liver cancer greatly improves the chances of survival with treatment. For patients in whom liver cancer is detected at an early stage and before symptoms occur – while the tumor is small and can be removed – the 5-year survival is greatly improved.  Learn more about who should be screened for liver cancer here.

Unfortunately, liver cancer is on the rise in the United States. The 2020 Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer found that the incidence of primary liver cancer in the United States increased by 2.5% overall and by 3.7% amongst women – the largest increase in incidence of any cancer between 2012-2016. Liver cancer was also stated as the second most common cause of death for Asian American and Pacific Islander males, who are disproportionately impacted by HBV, and the fifth most common cause of cancer deaths for men overall.

Making sure that people are protected from getting hepatitis B is so important in the U.S. – and establishing universal vaccination recommendations is essential to reducing liver cancer incidence and mortality. 

The Role of Universal Screening Guidelines for Hepatitis B

In the U.S., current childhood immunization recommendations by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) were established in the 1990s, and have significantly helped reduce rates of hepatitis B transmission over the past two decades, as more and more children have been vaccinated against hepatitis B. Individuals born prior to these recommendations, however, may be vulnerable to HBV, and span three generations: Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millennials. Together, these groups account for approximately 63% of the U.S. population. Within this vulnerable population, the recent rise in incidence of hepatitis B cases has increased the most within 30- 49 year olds, attributed to the opioid epidemic. Of the 2.4 million Americans estimated to be living with hepatitis B, approximately 75% remain undiagnosed and may display no symptoms. This increases the risk of transmission to unvaccinated household members or sexual partners who are unaware that precautions should be taken to prevent transmission. Lack of awareness and low vaccination rates in this community leave millions of Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Millenials vulnerable to HBV.

Take Action: Sign the Petition to Support a Recommendation for  Hepatitis B Vaccination for All Adults!

The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) is currently reviewing evidence to determine if they should recommend universal adult hepatitis B vaccination. If the committee votes in favor of the proposal, this would mean that all adults in the United States would officially be recommended to receive the hepatitis B vaccine by the federal government. 

universal adult hepatitis B recommendation is critical in addressing the consistently low adult hepatitis B vaccination rates and eliminating viral hepatitis in the United States. Please add your name to support universal adult hepatitis B vaccination by Friday, October 15th here. For questions or more information, please reach out to Michaela.Jackson@hepb.org. 

 Other Resources

  1. Listen and LearnListen to B Heppy’s newest podcast episode “Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B”! We chat with Dr. Rothstein from the University of Pennsylvania about the relationship between hepatitis B and liver cancer. He offers provider insight and recommendations to individuals listening.
  2. Check Out Liver Cancer Connect – This program was created to provide individuals and families with the information and support they need when facing the challenge of primary liver cancer.
  3. Seek Community SupportHep B Community a global peer-led, volunteer-driven forum to support those living with and affected by hep B. They are dedicated to connecting people affected by hepatitis B with each other and verified experts in the field, who provide trustworthy and accurate advice.
  4. Learn More From Experts – Dr. Robert Gish talks about treatment options for liver cancer. How does the stage of cancer affect treatment? Why are screening and surveillance so important? What are the available treatments and what are the therapies in development? Find out by listening to the webinar.

Liver Cancer Among Men

June is Men’s Health Month. This month we bring awareness to preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys. In 2020, The World Health Organization found that liver cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths with 830,000 deaths.1 Liver cancer occurs more often in men than in women with it being the 5th most commonly occurring cancer in men and the 9th most commonly occurring cancer in women.2

There are two main types of liver cancers, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) which accounts for about 75% of liver cancer cases, and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma which accounts for 12-15% of cases. Liver cancer especially impacts Asian countries like Mongolia, Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia, Thailand, and China. Hepatitis B is the leading cause of HCC globally. Of the 300 million individuals living with a chronic hepatitis B diagnosis, about 25% will develop HCC.3

Risk Factors

HCC affects men with an incidence 2x-4x higher than women due to differences in behavioral risk factors and biological factors.3 Research has found men were less likely to undergo HCC screening and more likely to smoke.  Additionally, studies have shown alcohol is a major risk factor for HCC. In the United States, HCC associated with alcohol is higher among men than in women at 27.8% and 15.4% respectively.3

Biologically, there is evidence estrogen (a female hormone) decreases IL-6 mediated hepatic inflammation and viral production.3 Studies have demonstrated IL-6 may promote virus survival and/or exacerbation of the disease.4 In the context of hepatitis B, men are at an increased risk for HCC as they do not produce estrogen which would help decrease the risk of IL-6, in turn, promoting viral survival.

Prevention

The great news is that HCC can be prevented by preventing hepatitis B. There is a safe and effective vaccine that can be completed in either 2 or 3 doses over a span of 3 months. Ask your healthcare provider for the hepatitis B vaccine series.

If you are unsure of your hepatitis B status, you can get tested! Ask your healthcare provider for the “Hepatitis B Panel” – it should include 3 parts. The panel is super simple and only requires one sample of blood.  If you are of Asian descent and male, it is especially important for you to get tested as liver cancer disproportionately impacts individuals from Asian countries and men.

If you have chronic hepatitis B, make sure your doctor screens you regularly for liver cancer. Typically done with a combination of blood tests and imaging, liver cancer screening can help detect HCC early when it is still curable.

As we wrap up June and Men’s Health Month, you are encouraged to get vaccinated and tested for hepatitis B. Take control of your health, and don’t wait!

References

  1. https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/cancer
  2. https://www.wcrf.org/dietandcancer/liver-cancer-statistics/
  3. Wu EM, Wong LL, Hernandez BY, et al. Gender differences in hepatocellular cancer: disparities in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/steatohepatitis and liver transplantation. Hepatoma Res. 2018;4:66. doi:10.20517/2394-5079.2018.87
  4. Velazquez-Salinas L, Verdugo-Rodriguez A, Rodriguez LL, Borca MV. The Role of Interleukin 6 During Viral Infections. Front Microbiol. 2019;10:1057. Published 2019 May 10. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2019.01057

 

Author: Evangeline Wang

Contact Information: info@hepb.org

 

Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer

Tomorrow, February 4th, marks World Cancer Day! This day harnesses the international community to “raise awareness, improving education and catalysing personal, collective and government action, we’re working together to reimagine a world where millions of preventable cancer deaths are saved and access to life-saving cancer treatment and care is equal for all – no matter who you are or where you live.”

Hepatitis B and Liver Cancer

Cancer is a disease in which normal cells change and grow uncontrollably, that can form a lump called a tumor or mass. A tumor can be benign (not cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The name of the cancer depends on the part of the body where the cancer first started. The term “primary liver cancer” refers to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer, which starts in liver cells called “hepatocytes.”

In the United States, primary liver cancer has become the fastest growing cancer in terms of incidence (new cases), in both men and women. From 2012-2016, the incidence of liver cancer increased by 2.5%, the largest increase of any cancer during the time period. In 2018, an estimated 42,220 new cases of liver cancer were diagnosed and an estimated 30,200 people died.

Liver cancer mortality also continues to increase, especially among Caucasian, Alaskan Native, American Indian and Hispanic males. Liver cancer disproportionately impacts certain communities more than others: in the U.S., it is now the 5th most common cause of cancer death for men overall, but the 2nd most common cause of cancer death among Asian American and Pacific Islander men, and the 4th most common cause of cancer death among Alaskan Native, American Indian and Hispanic males. The five-year survival rate is about 18%.

Worldwide, the most common risk factor for liver cancer is chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus. Chronic viral hepatitis infections (hepatitis B and hepatitis C) cause at least 80% of all liver cancers. In the United States, the leading cause is chronic hepatitis C virus infections because of the greater number of Americans infected with this virus. Chronic infections with hepatitis B or C are responsible for making liver cancer the most common cancer in many parts of the world. Take a look at other factors which might put you at a higher risk for developing liver cancer.

Prevention

The hepatitis B vaccine was named the first “anti-cancer” vaccine by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration because it prevents chronic hepatitis B infections, thereby preventing liver cancer caused by the hepatitis B virus. In the United States, the hepatitis B vaccine is recommended for all infants and children, and adults at high risk for infection. In many countries, including the United States, vaccinating newborns with the hepatitis B vaccine at birth has resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of new cases of liver cancer caused by hepatitis B. For more information about the vaccine, visit here.

For more information about liver cancer please visit our Liver Cancer Connect page.

 References

https://www.worldcancerday.org/about-us

https://www.hepb.org/research-and-programs/liver/

 

 

 

Holidays and Hepatitis B: Treat Your Liver Right

 

 

The holiday season is here! November and December are full with holidays like Diwali, Canadian Thanksgiving, American Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Christmas, and the New Year just to name a few. This time is often filled with love, happiness, and delicious food. If you or a family member is living with hepatitis B, it is important to eat mindfully during this festive time. Eating healthy is not always a possible option – not with delicious smells filling your kitchen, but you can make healthier choices! Here is a list of action items you can do to help maintain a healthy liver during the holidays:

  1. You can contribute a healthy dish – something filled with lean meats, hearty vegetables,  and is low in sodium.
  2. Try your best to avoid alcohol and go for drinks with lower amounts of added sugar.
    • Coffee has been associated with improvement in liver enzymes!
    • You can bring your own non-alcoholic beverage like a sparkling flavored drink.
  3. Choose fiber-rich foods like beets, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, and beans – your plate should look colorful!
    • Click on the veggies for some delicious and healthy recipes!
  4. Stay active – take a walk with your family/someone in your COVID social circle or do a free online exercise video.

Most importantly, do not feel guilty. Try your best to make healthy choices and not over-indulge, but do not beat yourself up if you do – your next meal can be healthier!

Remember that everything you consume is filtered through your liver; your liver never gets a break! The lifestyle tips listed above may seem simple, but they can have a large, positive impact on your health. Sticking to a regular healthy routine even during the holiday season will make it easier to continue those habits all year long! You can also check out our healthy liver tips to see what other actions can be taken to protect your liver.

Author: Evangeline Wang, Program Coordinator

Contact Information: info@hepb.org

Announcing the New Current Patient Opportunities Page on the HBF Website

A new page has been created on the Hepatitis B Foundation’s website that contains a compilation of various opportunities available for people living with hepatitis B. These opportunities can be for clinical trials, other types of research, or toolkits with information and resources for those living with hepatitis B and their loved ones and community members. All of these postings are produced or organized by entities external to HBF, but all are related to improved quality of life and liver health. The first two of these opportunities are listed below.

New Tool from CME Outfitters

A new HBV Patient Education Hub has been compiled by continuing medical education company CME Outfitters. The hub includes a great deal of valuable information, such as an overview of hepatitis B, a list of questions to ask your healthcare provider, a patient guide, information about hepatitis B co-infection, doctors’ advice on what to expect from treatment, and many other resources. All information is in an engaging and accessible format. Check it out today!

New Study Opportunity Available for People Living with Itching (Cholestatic Pruritus) Due to Liver Disease or Injury

A new paid opportunity has become available for those experiencing itching caused by hepatitis B, hepatitis C, drug-induced liver injury, auto-immune hepatitis, or primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). If you live in Canada or the US and have this condition, you may be eligible to participate in an interview to help researchers better understand your lived experience. The new research study is seeking participants ages 12-80 living in the US and Canada who are living with this itch. This is an opportunity to be involved in research and help advance scientific understanding! Contact the research coordinator for more information and to check if you are eligible. 

Please note that this study does not include treatment and pruritus must be at an intensity level of 4 on a scale of 1-10 for at least the past 8 weeks in order to participate. Patients cannot be pregnant or breastfeeding or have a diagnosis of primary biliary cholangitis. 

We are very excited to unveil this new section of our website and hope it will be a useful resource for many going forward! Please check back often, as more opportunities will be posted as they arise.

SHEA Updated Guidelines: Health Care Personnel Living Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and HIV

SHEA Updated Guidelines on Health Care Workers Living With Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus

 Many health care students and professionals in the U.S. are living with hepatitis B, hepatitis C or HIV. Living with these conditions should not interfere with a person’s health care education or professional career. It is important that health care students and professionals are aware of their rights and responsibilities – and equally important that health care schools and institutions are aware of their responsibilities, as well. There are now new guidelines to help institutions understand how to manage health care professionals living with hepatitis B, hepatitis C or HIV.

The Society of Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) recently updated their guidelines on health care workers who are living with hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). These updates reflect the advances in medical technologies and the low transmission risk health care workers living with HBV, HCV, and HIV pose. It is important to note, there have been very few cases of health care personnel (HCP) transmitting HBV,  HCV, or HIV to patients. These new guidelines, which align with the CDC’s Recommendations for the Management of Hepatitis B Virus-Infected Health-Care Providers and Students, can help reduce discrimination of health care students and personnel.

Some of the important updated recommendations for health care workers living with hepatitis B include:

  • Pre-vaccination testing does not need to be done unless the individual has an increased risk of infection
  • Health care workers should have a complete vaccination series for hepatitis B. Learn more about the vaccination series
  • Health care professionals living with HBV who do not perform exposure-prone procedures should not be prohibited from participating in patient-care activities solely on the basis of their HBV infection
  • Health care personnel living with HBV should seek optimal medical management, including, when appropriate, treatment with effective antiviral agents
  • Consistent with CDC guidelines, there is no justification for, nor benefit gained from, notifying patients with regard to health care professionals living with HBV who are being managed through an institution’s oversight panel

Some of the important updated recommendations for health care workers living with hepatitis C includes:

  • Because of the opioid epidemic in the United States, consideration should always be given to the possibility of substance use disorder when health care professional-to-patient transmission of a bloodborne pathogen is detected
  • Health care professionals living with HCV should seek optimal medical management, including treatment with effective antiviral agents to achieve cure of the infection
  • Health care professionals living with HCV who received treatment resulting in ‘undetectable’ circulating HCV-RNA levels can perform exposure-prone procedures with some stipulations:
    • Has not been previously identified as having transmitted infection to patients following definitive therapy resulting in a sustained virologic response (SVR)
    • Provides the oversight panel with records and laboratory results (or permits the HCP’s personal physician to provide records and laboratory results) confirming receipt of treatment and SVR
    • Has achieved SVR by remaining HCV RNA negative for 12 weeks following the completion of therapy

Some of the important updated recommendations for health care workers living with HIV:

  • Health care professionals living with HIV and who, despite appropriate antiretroviral treatment, have a confirmed viral load >200 copies/mL should not perform exposure-prone procedures until they have achieved virologic suppression
  • Scientists acknowledge that when the viral load is undetectable = untransmittable
  • Health care professionals living with HIV whose confirmed viral load is below 200 copies/mL can perform exposure-prone procedures with some stipulations:
    • Has not been previously identified as having transmitted infection to patients while receiving appropriate suppressive therapy
    • Obtains advice from an oversight panel about recommended practices to minimize the risk of exposure events
    • Is followed by a physician who has expertise in the management of HIV infection and who is allowed by the individual to participate in or communicate with the oversight panel about the individual’s clinical status
    • Is monitored on a periodic basis (eg, every 6 months) to assure that the HIV RNA remains below the level of detection, with results provided to the oversight panel.
    • Is followed closely by their physician and the oversight panel instances in which fluctuations in HIV viremia occur, including appropriate retesting as discussed above to reevaluate the HCP’s viral load
    • Agrees, in writing, to follow the recommendations of the oversight panel

Read more about the guidance and information on how hospitals, professional schools, and institutions should proceed for healthcare workers living with HBV, HCV, and HIV. You can also read more about the rights and protections for health care students and professionals living with hepatitis B in the U.S.

 

Reference

Henderson, D., Dembry, L., Sifri, C., Palmore, T., Dellinger, E., Yokoe, D., . . . Babcock, H. (2020). Management of healthcare personnel living with hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or human immunodeficiency virus in US healthcare institutions. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, 1-9. doi:10.1017/ice.2020.458

Author: Evangeline Wang, Program Coordinator, Hepatitis B Foundation

Contact Information: info@hepb.org

Your Liver and Hepatitis B

 

Your Liver and Hepatitis B

 Happy Liver Cancer Awareness Month! Your liver is an important organ for digesting food and breaking down toxins. Its main functions include: filtering blood from the digestive tract and transporting it back to the rest of the body, removing toxins from the blood, and storing important nutrients that keep the body healthy.

Hepatitis B is a viral infection of your liver that can cause serious damage over time. Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) can ultimately lead to scarring, cirrhosis, liver cancer, and liver failure. Liver cancer is the 3rd deadliest cancer worldwide, with 5-year survival rates of only 19%. There are few effective treatments for liver cancer, and we, therefore, must rely on prevention and early detection in order to save lives. Chronic hepatitis B infection causes approximately 78% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), or primary liver cancer. The key to saving lives is ensuring that individuals infected with HBV are diagnosed and linked with appropriate care, including regular screening for liver cancer.

In the U.S., liver cancer incidence and death rates are increasing at a faster rate than any other cancer and are projected to continue to rise through at least 2030. Up to 2.2 million people are chronically infected by HBV in the U.S. and the majority is unaware of their infection. Identifying, managing and treating those with HBV infection can help prevent liver cancer in many people. Additionally, regularly screening people with chronic hepatitis B  for liver cancer can aid with early detection and treatment of liver cancer. If diagnosed early, liver cancer can be treated and even cured.

Below are some practices you can easily incorporate into your daily life and routine to keep your liver healthy while living with hepatitis B.

Healthy Liver Tips

  1. Reduce alcohol intake: Alcoholic beverages can damage or destroy liver cells and create additional health problems.
  2. Eat a healthy diet: Increase the amount of whole foods in your diet like fruits and vegetables while decreasing the amount of refined carbohydrates (pastas, white rice, white bread), processed sugar, and saturated fats which can create a healthy environment for your liver.
  3. Daily exercise: It is recommended for adults to exercise at least 60 minutes per day. Not only does this have many other health benefits, but it can reduce the fat surrounding your liver which can decrease your risk of liver cancer.
  4. Avoid the use of illicit drugs: Drugs like marijuana, cocaine, heroin, inhalants, or hallucinogens put stress on your liver and reduce its functioning capability.
  5. Wash produce and read labels on household chemicals: Pesticides and other chemicals can contain toxins which are harmful to your liver.

Incorporating these healthy practices does not have to be difficult. Choose one of the five tips that is most convenient with your current lifestyle and use it as a starting point for a healthier routine. By gradually incorporating each healthy liver tip into your lifestyle, you can reduce your risk of a negative liver outcome creating a healthier you!

Resources for Liver Cancer and Hepatitis B

Please join Hepatitis B Foundation, Hep B United and Hep B United Philadelphia’s webinar on October 20th at 3PM ET to learn more about hepatitis B and liver cancer. Dr. Kenneth Rothestein, Director of Regional Outreach and Regional Hepatology from Penn Medicine will be highlighting the importance of liver cancer screening for prevention. Register here!

To promote and ultimately prevent liver cancer this October we are pleased to share the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Know Hepatitis B (KHB) Campaign Product of the Month – the Infographic: “Get Tested for Hepatitis B.”

The CDC’s Know Hepatitis B Campaign’s infographic, “Get Tested for Hepatitis B” encourages Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to get tested for hepatitis B. This 2-page downloadable document is available in English, Traditional Chinese, Vietnamese and Korean languages and answers commonly asked questions about hepatitis B.

For more information about the Know Hepatitis B Campaign, visit the campaign website.

 

Author: Evangeline Wang, Program Coordinator, Hepatitis B Foundation

Contact Information: info@hepb.org