Hep B Blog

Hep B and COVID-19: Resources for Individuals and Healthcare Workers

Amidst the global challenges we are facing, the Hepatitis B Foundation remains a resource for our community and our partners. COVID-19 is a rapidly developing situation, and information about it’s impact on those living with liver diseases such as hepatitis B is still emerging. During this time, it is important to be prepared for all situations, including limited access to necessities. Below, we have provided several tips and tools to help you protect yourself and stay healthy. 

Preparing for Quarantine or Self-Isolation

To prevent transmission of the virus, countries around the world are instating protocols requiring individuals to stay home and to practice social distancing as much as possible. If you are currently on hepatitis B medication, it is important to make sure that you have enough medication for an extended period of time. Call your doctor and ask them to write a 90-day prescription for your treatment if they have not done so. The American Association on the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) reports that many insurance companies are waiving refill limits on prescriptions, so you can request additional medication at any time. As skipping a day of treatment may cause the virus to flare and increase the risk of liver damage, it is essential to speak with your healthcare provider about long-term medication access.

If you had a doctor’s appointment scheduled during this time period, see if your doctor’s office is scheduling telehealth appointments or holding virtual meetings with their clients instead. Some services for those living with hepatitis B, such as ultrasounds or even blood work, may be delayed until further notice unless there is a cause for concern. You may want to consider scheduling a virtual meeting to discuss your situation and address any questions you may have about recent test results or concerning symptoms. Most telehealth services should be accessible directly from your phone if you do not have access to a computer. 

It is also important to continue protecting the health of your liver.  Consider stocking up on canned vegetables and fruits instead of items that may be unhealthy.  Be sure to read the nutrition labels, as some canned goods can have high sodium and sugar contents. If you have the means, you can also purchase fresh fruits and vegetables, and freeze them to use over the upcoming weeks. Physical activity – both indoor and outdoor – is encouraged during this time as well! Practice social distancing for outdoor activities, and get creative for indoor workouts. 

Protecting Yourself During the Pandemic:

Many individuals are wondering how those living with hepatitis B can protect themselves from COVID-19. Current recommendations are to practice social distancing and to wash your hands frequently with soap and water. Be sure to scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds! If soap and water are not available, a hand sanitizer that contains 60% or more alcohol will also kill the virus. 

Dr. Robert Gish, Medical Director for the Hepatitis B Foundation, says, “If you’re living with chronic hepatitis B or C without cirrhosis, you should be following the standard precautions for the coronavirus infection. The coronavirus does affect liver inflammation and liver enzymes and can also cause liver dysfunction, so individuals living with cirrhosis will be at higher risk for liver disease progression and decompensation.” Dr. Gish also recommends that individuals living with cirrhosis take special precautions, such as increased monitoring of liver enzymes. If you develop COVID-19, Dr. Gish recommends close monitoring of both liver enzymes and liver function. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also recommends that those with serious chronic conditions self-isolate with or without an official stay-at-home order. 

Resources for Providers and Healthcare Workers:

Resources for Those Living with Hepatitis B

About COVID-19: 

COVID-19 is a respiratory illness caused by a new coronavirus that was discovered in 2019. While most people who become infected experience a mild reaction, COVID-19 can develop into a serious illness in individuals with underlying illnesses and chronic conditions. Precautions should be taken to prevent transmission and keep you, your family, and your community safe.

 

Stay up-to-date with the most recent information. 

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