Hep B Blog

Newly Diagnosed with Hepatitis B? Acute or Chronic? Learning the Hep B Basics

Image courtesy of dream designs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of dream designs at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

If you’ve just been diagnosed with hepatitis B after a routine blood test or following a blood donation, you may be feeling overwhelmed with information about this complicated infection and references to acute or chronic hepatitis B.

Here is an explanation of these two terms and what happens when you’re first infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B is transmitted through blood and body fluids. It can be spread during unprotected sex, unsafe medical procedures, exposure to blood that enters your body through a cut,  or by sharing personal items such as body jewelry or toothbrushes. Most commonly it is spread during childbirth when the mother is infected.

What is a chronic infection? When we’re infected as newborns or young children, our immature immune systems don’t notice or fight the virus and it travels to our liver and begins reproducing. With no opposition from our immune systems, a hepatitis B infection can continue for years. When a hepatitis B infection lasts longer than six months, it is considered a chronic or long-term infection. Most people with chronic hepatitis B were infected at birth or during early childhood. Immunization with the hepatitis B vaccine and hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG), if available, within 12 to 24 hours of birth can break this mother-to-child infection cycle, but the birth vaccine dose and often HBIG is not always available around the world.

What is an acute infection? When we’re infected with HBV as healthy adults, about 90 percent of us are able to get rid of the infection within six months. It can take up to six months for our immune systems to generate antibodies and eradicate the infection in our liver. This short-term infection is called acute hepatitis B.

To determine if you have an acute or chronic infection, you must be tested for hepatitis B over a six-month period. The specific test that indicates if you are infected is the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) test. This antigen covers the surface of the virus and usually there are lots of HBsAg in your blood when you’re infected. If you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it means you have a chronic hepatitis B infection.

But, if you no longer test positive (or “reactive”) for HBsAg after six months and you develop hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb), then you have cleared hepatitis B after an “acute” infection. There are some additional blood tests that your doctor may order to get a better understanding of your infection, but not everyone has access to these tests. Some tests are rather expensive and they may still need to be repeated over time in order to confirm the diagnosis. Please be patient. The good news is that hepatitis B is not typically an emergency.

Here is more good news. If you are a healthy adult and are newly or acutely infected, know that your chances are good that the hepatitis B infection will go away on its own. It is rare that you require medication to get rid of the virus, your immune system does that for you.  A person with a new hepatitis B infection may not have any symptoms, or they may not be very notable. For example, you might feel more tired. About 70 percent of people newly-infected with hepatitis B never experience symptoms.

But, some people experience severe symptoms like jaundice (yellowing skin or eyes), severe nausea or vomiting, or a bloated stomach (unrelated to your weight), and they need to see a doctor immediately. If you have a new or acute infection, even these drastic symptoms may not necessarily mean that you need any form of treatment, but you will need to be monitored with additional tests to make sure your liver is safe.

If you can’t confirm you were infected as a child, you will need to wait the six months to find out if you cleared your infection. Please be patient and do not panic, but remember you do need to take precautions during this time to make sure you don’t spread the infection to others. Practice safe sex (use a condom), and don’t share personal items that may have trace amounts of blood on them.

Also, you can suggest that your family members get screened for hepatitis B and vaccinated if needed. If you were infected at birth, there is a chance that your siblings may also be infected. Sexual partners and close household members should also be tested. There may be a nine-week period right after infection when they may not test positive for HBsAg even if they have been infected.

Comments on this blog are closed. If you have questions about hepatitis B or this blog post, please email info@hepb.org or call 215-489-4900.

1,108 thoughts on “Newly Diagnosed with Hepatitis B? Acute or Chronic? Learning the Hep B Basics”

    1. Acute hepatitis B resolves on its own and is considered cured. However, for patients that are chronically infected there is no complete cure at this time.

      1. hi if the person has positive hbe ag but it surely cure it became negative -0.047
        years passing by. there is a possibility that it would be positive again?thanks

        1. Actually there is the possibility of “flip-flopping” and there is also the possibility of going from an inactive phase of the virus to an e antigen positive phase. The best way to know what is going is going on is through regular monitoring – every 6 months if possible to be sure there are no changes to your HBV or the health of your liver.

          1. Just share more tests results,
            Hbs Ab neg
            Hbe Ab pos
            HBc Ab pos
            Anti hbc Igm non-reactive
            Hep. Delta Ab non-reactive.
            Need your valuable advice on this

          2. Once again, your results indicate that you are in the inactive phase of the virus. Just be sure to continue with regular monitoring to be sure there are no changes over time with your HBV or the health of your liver. Sometimes things do change, so this is important. Be sure your ALT/AST and other liver function tests are also monitored and be sure to maintain a healthy lifestyle – no alcohol, avoiding smoking and environmental toxins, and maintaining a healthy weight through a well balanced diet and regular exercise.

          3. If the patients hep b viral load is undetectable, what is the chance that the viral load can be detected/active again?
            Since the viral load is undetectable, is it possible that the body clears that virus completely?

          4. Hello: It is a very good sign when the viral load is undetectable — and if they are HBeAg-negative and have no signs of liver damage with normal ALT. This may mean that a patient is on his or her way to clearing the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and in rare cases may develop surface antibodies. However, if the patient’s immune system is weakened by illness or if they are treated with immune-suppressing drugs or chemotherapy, the infection can reactivate and viral load can start to increase again. That is why it’s important to continue to monitor a patient’s viral load and liver enzymes (ALT/SPGT) regularly. Hope this helps.

          5. what would you do if you have hbv? do you know what herbal medicine for hbv? my friend gets that through sex to her husband

          6. Hello: There is no cure for hepatitis B right now, though experts predict one will be developed in the next few years. Tell your friend that many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B. There is a very safe and effective vaccine that protects you from hepatitis B. Experts recommend treatment only if you are experiencing liver damage from the infection. This is indicated by a blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). If she is recently infected, her immune system may be able to clear hepatitis B on its own within six months. It is important that she be tested in six months to find out if she is still infected. If she is, she should see a specialist and get tested for liver damage. Good luck.

        2. Hi, i am tested positive with HBV, my doctor told me i have to be tested again after 6 months. My wife tested negative and she was vaccineted. Can i do sex with her without a condom since she was only vaccinated once, ie she has not complited the vaccination cycle? Can i use drugs like viagra and the like to raise my sexual capacity?. Is it possible to the age of HBV in my body?

          1. Hello: Until your wife completes all three hepatitis B vaccine doses, you should practice safe sex and use a condom. Keep in mind that it can take several weeks after exposure to the hepatitis B virus for a medical test to reveal signs of infection and the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), so she should be retested after all three vaccine shots.
            There are no indications that Viagra will cause problems if you have hepatitis B, however you should discuss that with your doctor. Good luck.

          2. Good Day, I’m mark, Registered Nurse in philippines. I am Hep B positive. I just want to ask is there any country will hired professionals with hep B? Thanks

          3. Hello: There are many countries that rightfully place no restrictions on healthcare providers with hepatitis B. This includes Europe, U.S., Canada and other countries. Unfortunately, some countries in the Middle East and elsewhere will not issue work or student visas to people living with hepatitis B. This is discriminatory, cruel and absolutely unnecessary. Click here https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6103a1.htm?s_cid=rr6103a1_w to read a copy of the U.S. CDC guidelines on hepatitis B-infected healthcare providers. Good luck.

        3. In my case,,in other physician i was negative hbsag but in some im positive? My hbsag unit is 12:22 reference range is 1.0 negative.,in my case because i first diagnose negative i was do vaccinized with amvaxB..i was also go other contry because i was negative,,now i had my visa application going to canada where they found im hbsag posive???do candian embassy still issue me visa?does it affect my application??thank you

          1. Hello: Canada does not discriminate against visa applicants just because they are hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive. It should not affect your application. Good luck.

      2. Hi,
        I was diagnosed hbs Ag in 2005. Since then i have been conducting regular tests. My hbeag is neg, hbe antibodies pos n pcr neg (undetectable). Only problem with me is hbsag, which does not become negative. Can u please tell me, as its clearly chronic, can hbsag become negative? N whether i shd be doing protected sex n if my wife is vaccinated den is it fine to have normal intercourse. Thanks

        1. Your situation is not at all uncommon and typically part of the natural history of the virus. Most will eventually seroconvert and lose HBeAg, gain the antibody and the viral load will go to low or undetectable levels. This is called the inactive phase of the virus and that sounds like that is where you are – a good place to be. There are a very lucky 2-3% that will spontaneously seroconvert and lose HBsAg and gain the antibody, but there is no way to “make” this happen and no medication to make this “cure”. Hopefully there will be a complete cure in the next few years with the newer compounds in development.

          If your wife has completed the 3 shot HBV series, then she should be protected. If you wish to confirm her immunity, you can ask the doctor to run an anti-HBs titer test to be sure she has an adequate titer. Don’t panic if it’s not adequate. Sometimes the titers wane over time. If that were the case, have her get a booster shot and re-run the titer 1 month after the booster.

          Please try not to worry . You are in a good place and the HBV vaccine is very effective. No need to continue with protected sex.

          1. Hi, hope you could help me with my case. My HBsAg test results 4,127.42 S/CO to REACTIVE interpretation. What does it mean and what other test do i have to undergo? I am 8weeks pregnant by now, how can it affect my baby? I’m confused and worried. Please give me some advice.

          2. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it means you are infected with hepatitis B. You need to return to your doctor and get thoroughly tested for hepatitis B to find out the true state of your hepatitis B infection. They will test for other antigens and antibodies, and they should test your ALT or SGPT liver enzyme level. These liver enzymes increase above normal when liver cells are damaged by infections such as hepatitis B. The doctor will be able to figure out how long you have been infected (you should be tested over a six-month period. When we’re infected as adults, it takes our immune system several weeks or months to clear the infection. However, when we become infected at birth (because our mothers were infected when we were born), our immature immune systems don’t notice or attack the virus, and we develop a long-term or chronic infection.
            Your doctor should monitor your viral load (HBV DNA) also, and administer antivirals if they are very high.
            When your baby is born, it is important that the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine and a dose of HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) are administered to him or her within 12 hours of birth to protect against infection. For more information, please see http://www.hepb.org/pdf/pregnancy.pdf
            Good luck, please don’t hesitate to ask more questions, I know this is a lot of information for you to absorb. Good luck.

        2. Thanks a lot for your valuable advice. Thats was very helpful indeed. Much appreciated.. I regulalrly check my alt to be on the safe side. Fingers crossed for hbsag to get negative.

      3. If you think you might have been affected 35 yrs ago, could it just now be showing up in ALT tests as high? Up to now ALT has always been normal.

        1. Hello: Many people with hepatitis B have normal ALT liver enzyme levels (normal is 30 for men and 19 for women). Over time, however, they can rise as the immune system attacks the hepatitis B-infected liver cells. I would suggest you get tested for hepatitis B and have a full liver panel to see if you are infected and to try to determine what is causing the increase in ALT levels. In the U.S., doctors recommend “baby boomers” also get tested for hepatitis C, which is another liver infection that can cause elevated ALT levels.
          If you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), we recommend you get retested again six months later. If you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, then you have a chronic infection. Often, there are no noticeable side effects from hepatitis B, so many people don’t know they have it until they try to donate blood or have a test as part of a regular medical check-up. If you test positive for either hepatitis B or C, we recommend you see a liver specialist.
          In the meantime, take care of your liver by avoiding alcohol and smoking, and eat healthy foods. During this time you should consider yourself infectious. HBV is not spread casually, but is transmitted through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Be sure to keep cuts, bites, etc. covered, practice safe sex using a condom because HBV is transmitted sexually, and keep personal hygiene items such as toothbrushes, razors, body jewelry or nail clippers (anything that might have trace amounts of blood on them) separate from others so they are not accidentally shared. Good luck.

          1. Hello
            Am hepa b reactive , my results are
            Anti hbe positive
            Anti hbs negative
            Hbeag negative
            Hbsag positive
            Igm anti hepatitis b core ag is negative what’s my condition now

          2. Hello: Your tests indicate you have hepatitis B, how long have you tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)? If you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it means you have a chronic infection, and may have been infected during early childhood.
            Has your doctor tested your liver enzymes for any liver damage? Ask about a blood test for ALT (also called SGPT) to see if the infection is harming your liver, and make sure you eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

      4. I have been diagnosed recently with the following profile : Hbsag positive, Hbsab -Negative, Hbeag- negative, Hbeab–positive, Hbcab-positive ,Igg-negaative and Igm- Positive . Is this acute or chronic

        1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. If you test positive for the HBsAg for longer than six months, it means you have chronic hepatitis B and were probably infected as a baby. If healthy adults are infected, it can take up to six months for the immune system to eradicate the infection. Good luck.

      5. hello sir I am newly diagnosed hepatitis B, my PCR viral load is less than 100 I want to turn hepatitis B positive to negative. Is this is possible?

        1. Hello: There is no cure for hepatitis B, however there are effective antiviral treatments that lower your viral load (HBV DNA) and your risk of liver damage. However, you have a very low viral load (PCR HBV DNA) so you may not require treatment. Some of the best things you can do for your health is to avoid alcohol and cigarettes and eat healthy foods. Also, practice safe sex, and continue to be monitored by your doctor. Good luck.

      6. Hi, Is Hepatitis B Reactive Curable? I just found out that i Have this kind of sickness last 2013 on my medical exam for a job here in the Philippines. I had my second Opinion but the result is the same. I never had a test since then. Please reply. Thank you.

        1. Hello: There is no cure yet for hepatitis B, however there are two very effective antivirals -– entecavir and tenofovir (Viread) and its TAF formulation that was recently approved by FDA –- that quickly reduce your viral load (HBV DNA) and your risk of liver damage if you should ever need treatment. To find out the latest in new hepatitis B drugs in development, please visit our Drug Watch page at: http://www.hepb.org/treatment-and-management/drug-watch/
          And, for an update from a recent international workshop on future hepatitis B cures, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/blog/global-researchers-brainstorm-solutions-search-cure-hepatitis-b/
          Good luck.

          1. Hello. I have Hep B chronic infection. It was inactive for some period but I got pregnant and now it seems active with a viral load around 1400 and undamaged liver function. How high (bad) is the viral load? My partner will do some blood tests soon. It is possible that he did not get the infection or if he got it (acute) he is able to get rid of it and get vaccinated afterwards? One more question, can I give birth naturally or it is required a C-Section in my case in order to protect my baby? We are from Romania and living in London, UK, where I will also have my baby. Thank you, waiting for reply.

          2. Hello: A viral load (HBV DNA) of 1,400 IU/mL is not very high. I am happy to hear the infection has not caused any liver damage.
            However, there is something very important that you must do. In order to prevent your baby from becoming infected with hepatitis B from direct contact with your blood and body fluids during delivery, your newborn must be vaccinated with the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccinate within 12 hours of birth, and be given HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies). This will prevent infection.
            Getting a C-section will not reduce the risk of infection.
            Make sure you continue to be monitored during and after your pregnancy. It is safe to breastfeed with hepatitis B. Also, make sure your baby receives all three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine on time. Good luck.

      7. Is there a possibility that you get a positive result in a hepa b test after youcompleted the 3 shots hepa vaccination?
        What happen to a person injected with hepa b vaccine and positive (reactive) in hepa b test?

        1. Hello: If you were infected with hepatitis B at birth or during early childhood and have a chronic infection, getting vaccinated against hepatitis B will not make the infection go away.
          How long after your last hepatitis B vaccine shot were you tested? You should wait at least one month before getting tested, otherwise you will test positive for the vaccine’s surface antigen.
          However, if you waited that long and test positive, you may have been infected before your vaccination.
          Please get tested for hepatitis B again, and be sure to include a liver function test to make sure the infection is not harming your liver.
          Good luck.

    2. Hello what does it mean if the result of antihbs is very low? Then the hbsAg is negative and non reactive?

      1. Hello: Guidelines say you should have at least 10 miu/ml of hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-HBs) in order to be fully protected or immune from hepatitis B. If you have under that amount, you should possibly be tested for hepatitis B, and if you are not infected, you should be vaccinated to protect you against infection. Good luck.

        1. Sir my HBSAG IS rective, anti HBeAG antibody 0.01 positive,index value of HBeAG is 0.02 negative, HBV VIRAL LOAD is ‹ 3.8 IU/ml and my liver function test result -alkaline phosphatase 73, serum GGT 170.00 HIGH, MEAN NORMAL PROTHROMBIN TIME- 12.0, PROTHROMBIN TIME-11.6, I.N.R -0.97, SGOT(AST)32,SGPT(AKT)-58.,BILIRUBIN(TOTAL,DIRECT,INDIRECT)-1.18 HIGH, SERUM DIRECT BILIRUBIN 0.24 HIGH, SERUM INDIRECT BILIRUBIN 0.98.
          Sir i need your valuevable advice..Thnk u.

          1. Hello: I’m having trouble interpreting your HBV DNA viral load, but your liver enzyme level for SGPT is 58. Liver cells release SGPT (also called ALT) when they are damaged. Healthy SGPT levels for men are up to 30 and for women up to 19. Yours are moderately elevated. We recommend you talk to your doctor and review your overall health, gender, age, and how long you have had hepatitis B to determine if treatment is recommended. If you live outside of the U.S. and Europe (which have their own treatment guidelines), you may want to review the World Health Organization’s hepatitis B treatment guidelines with your doctor and discuss if you require treatment. They are found at: http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/
            Good luck.

      1. Hello: It appears you have tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). This indicates you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Is this the first time you have been tested for hepatitis B? To know if you were recently infected and have an acute or short-term infection or a long-term, chronic infection, you must get tested again for HBsAg in six months. It can take about six months for a healthy adult who was recently infected to clear hepatitis B. When newborns (born to infected women) or young children are infected, their immature immune systems don’t recognize and fight the infection and it can become chronic or long-term. In the meantime, your doctor may want to test your liver enzymes through a simple blood test to find out if the infection is causing any liver damage. During this time, it is important to avoid alcohol and cigarettes, practice safe sex, and make sure your family members are tested and vaccinated if needed. Good luck.

    3. Dear sir my wife is found Hvsag positive when she is pregnant but when I have checked my Hvsag it is found negative.
      The doctor told me that she is only the carrier.
      Can you please help me to explain how I have to proceed my life.Should I take any precautions or it is normal.

      1. Hello: You should get vaccinated with three-dose hepatitis B vaccine as soon as you can. Until you are fully vaccinated, you should use a condom. The immunization will protect you for all of your life and it is a safe and effective vaccine.
        If and when you have children, it is very important that the newborn is is vaccinated with the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine within 12 hours of birth and also is given a dose of HBIG, otherwise there is a high risk that the baby will become infected because of exposure to blood and body fluids during delivery. Good luck.

      2. I was infected with hepatitis b virus. The test result initially shows that am hepatitis b surface antigen positive. But after taking medicine for some time the test result now shows that am hepatitis b surface antigen negative.
        Does it mean I have fully recovered from the virus?
        Does it also mean that am immune to the disease?
        Does it mean that I can not pass it on to another person?

        1. Hello: Congratulations, it is a great thing to clear or eradicate the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and achieve a low viral load (HBV DNA), if that is the case. This means your immune system is suppressing the hepatitis B infection. Ideally, you may develop hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-HBs), but even if you don’t, you have made great strides in clearing the infection.
          Continue to eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and continue to get monitored, perhaps once a year, for HBsAg and also for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT) to make sure the infection does not return and harm your liver.
          You are at low risk of transmitting the infection because you have cleared HBsAg, but it’s always a good idea to practice safe sex until you know for sure your partner is immunized and protected. Good luck!

        2. hi, may i know what medicine did u take? im also reactive in hepb surface antigen..i tried liverine capsule for 3 mos but still the result is reactive..now im taking food supplement and had a test again last month and still reactive..please what medicine did u take? i want to try also..

          1. Hello: Please know there is no cure for hepatitis B, and there is no supplement that will make the infection go away.
            Some people are lucky enough to clear hepatitis B, but the best thing you can do is get monitored regularly, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and eat a healthy, low-fat diet.
            Good luck.

        3. Am hepatitis b positive since 2013. Can you tell you what drug you use that make the charge viral go because my ALT IS 44 U/ml

          1. Hello: There is no cure for hepatitis B, however if you have a high viral load (determined by an HBV DNA test) and elevated ALT levels, antiviral treatment with either tenofovir or entecavir is recommended. Good luck.

      3. hi,my serum bilirubin-direct is 5.8 high, indirect 17.5 high,23.3 umol/il in total,and all other liver test r normal, please what does it mean thnk u

        1. Hello: I cannot comment on your bilirubin levels, you need to consult with your doctor. It is good news that your liver tests are normal. Good luck.

    4. Hi my father had hepatitis B a long time ago, when I was a kid I used his tooth brush this one time and my gums had started to bleed… let’s say for argue mentitive sake it’s been around ten years later are the chances of me having it low as it hasn’t came up yet? I know it can lay dormant but not sure how long for

      1. Hello: Though not advisable, there is a low chance that you became infected. If you became infected at that time, your prior test for hepatitis B would have shown signs of infection. If you are concerned, please get tested again and also get vaccinated so you are forever protected against hepatitis B. Good luck.

        1. Hi, I am chronic hepa B carrier since 2014 and just recebtly I have decided to get a full panel hepa profiling. May you please interpret my test result:

          HbsAg – PC: 1.534 COV: 0.141 reactive

          ANTI-HBS – PC: 0.103 COV: 0.105 non reactive

          HBEAG PC: 0.102 COV: 0.105 NON REACTIVE

          ANTI HBE (REVERSE) PC: 0.972 COV: 1.035 REACTIVE

          ANTI HBC G (REVERSE) PC: 0.629 COV: 0.956 REACTIVE

          ANTI HBC M PC: 0.162 COV: 0.163 NON REACTIVE

          SGPT SI: 28 REFERENCE 0-47 IU/L

          SGOT SI: 26 REFERENCE 10 -40 IU/L

          Please help me interpret above result. Or you can send me a message in my email: joanclavillas@gmail.com. Thank you so much in advance!

          1. Hello: As your doctor probably explained, you appear to have “inactive” hepatitis B. You did not include your viral load (HBV DNA), but your results show you have cleared the “e” antigen (HBeAg) and have the “e” antibody (anti HBe), which usually indicates your viral load is probably low. Also, your liver enzyme (SGPT) is within your lab’s normal range (you have 28 and the normal range is 0-47).
            It is important that you continue to be monitored regularly, at least every six to 12 months, to make sure any liver damage is identified and treated should it ever occur. Good luck.

          2. Thank you so much for this. I’m planning to get the hbv dna and liver ultrasound on the first week of February. Can you further expalin what does inactive means? And what you mean when u said I have cleared the e antigen and have the e anti body? Is there a possibilty that my HBSAG will turn negative? Thank you so much. 😊

    5. My son tested positive to hepatitis b in aug 2016 (Acute Hepatitis B).
      First LFT Aug 2016
      T-Bilibrin 23.9
      Conju bilibrin 22.3
      Alk Phos 436
      AST 124
      ALT 129

      Second LFT: Sep 2016
      T-Bilibrin 16.5
      Conju bilibrin 11.6
      Alk Phos 344
      AST 109
      ALT 106

      Third LFT: Jan 2017
      T-Bilibrin 9
      Conju bilibrin 3
      Alk Phos 112
      AST 19
      ALT 15

      Now his Hepatitis B surface antigen test is NEGATIVE.

      What does this imply? Is he healed. His next appointment with the doctor is in April but will like to know your view or input based on this result

      1. Hello: It is all good news! His immune system was strong enough to attack the infection and he appears on his way to clearing it. His liver damage is declining (his liver enzymes are now down to normal levels, with his ALT at 15) and he has cleared the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). What you should be looking for is appearance of the hepatitis B surface antibody (anti HBs) to confirm he has cleared the infection. Good news!

      2. Hello ma,please am hepatitis b positive since 2013.My ALT is 15 U/ml is 2013 but now 44 U/ml in 2017. Can you tell me what drug your son use that make the charge viral go because my ALT is presently 44 U/ml

      1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Most healthy adults who are infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. This is called an acute infection.
        However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it is considered a chronic infection. It means you were probably infected at birth or during early childhood, when your immature immune system could not fight it.
        Knowing whether your hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. Please get tested again in six months to find out if it’s chronic or acute. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
        Good luck.

    1. First you need to know if you have acute or chronic HBV. You can determine this with repeat HBsAg testing. If you remain positive after 6 months then you are chronically infected. Chronic HBV is not completely curable, but there are good treatments. Please talk to your doctor about your situation.

  1. I tested hepatits b positive but acute, how would I know when I had it or it’s been six months,
    and will it be classified chronic so far as it’s six months?

    1. If you test HBsAg+ for longer than 6 months then you are considered chronically infected. If you find that you are no longer HBsAg+ then I would ask your doctor to run a hepatitis B panel which tests for HBsAg, HBcAb, HBsAb. If you have cleared the infection you will be HBsAg neg, HBcAb pos, HBsAb pos. If you find that you are still HBsAg+ then you want to see a liver specialist for further testing.

      1. Hi, I had also acute hep b infection, my six months test results are
        HBsAg (-)10
        HbcAb lgM (+)35.3

        Sud hbsab be (+) >12.5 to means that I have natural cure?

        1. Hello: If I am interpreting the results correctly, you now test negative (-) for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and positive for the hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb). Once you’ve lost HBsAg and have more than 10 mIU/mL of HBsAb, you have cleared your hepatitis B infection. Congratulations!

    1. 90% of healthy adults infected with HBV will clear the infection on their own. Most require little or no medical intervention and very few are actually treated for acute HBV. Please be sure to follow up with testing. If you continue to test HBsAg+ for more than 6 months, then you infection is chronic and not acute. If this is the case, you will want to see a liver specialist for further evaluation.

      1. In this reply you say if you test for HBsAg+ for more than 6 months than the infection is acute and not chronic. …ok.. doesnt make sense, because you contradict yourself. Especially with the response before that one says: If you test for HBsAg+ for more than 6 months than you are considered chronically infected.just saying it is already confusing as is.

        1. That was an error on my part. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. I believe I found and corrected that response to a question. Sorry for the confusion and thanks for bringing it to my attention!

          1. Hi My name is Jennifer and I am 32 yrs old. I am diagnosed with Chronic Hep B and I have had it for 8 1\2 yrs now. My boyfriend has Cirrhosis from being an alcoholic few yrs back. Could you tell me the best way I can prevent him from getting what I have and for me not to get what he has BC we are worried and very concerned about.

          2. Hello: The best way to protect your boyfriend is to make sure he is vaccinated against hepatitis B, until then be sure to practice safe sex to prevent exposure to infectious blood and body fluids.
            His cirrhosis (severe liver scarring) cannot be transmitted to you because it doesn’t result from an infection. It’s the result of his past alcohol abuse. I hope that his recovery will allow his liver to recover from the past exposure to alcohol. Good luck to you both.

    1. First determine if you have an acute or chronic infection. This blog will help, but basically if you test HBsAg+ for more than 6 months then you are considered chronically infected. If you find out you have a chronic infection, please see a liver specialist so your HBV and liver health can be thoroughly evaluated.

  2. Last year I went for a health screen everything was ok but they just told me that I had low level of certain enzyme not worry about . They carried on checking to make sure that everything was ok and last month I was diagnostic hepatitis B positive. Now I have to go for a liver Ultrasound scan next month and a doctor appointment in more than month. This wait seems to be forever. How can I know if it’s acute or chronic! I was born in Africa 42 years ago, is it possible that I had it since childhood with no symptoms at all? My partner of 18 years though she didn’t have immunity against it doesn’t contract it neither are my little ones. But everybody is going through their boost now for the children.

    1. It is very possible that you have a chronic HBV infection. Children are very susceptible to HBV and tend to remain chronic after they are infected. 90% of healthy adults are able to clear a new or acute case of HBV. HBV is very prevalent throughout most of Africa. It is possible that your partner was previously infected, which would show up if a hepatitis B panel is run (HBcAb+ – notes previous infection, HBsAb+ notes generation of antibodies to HBV). It is possible you are currently in the inactive phase, and may have been for years, so you may have a low viral load, making transmission less likely. Be sure you partner has an hepatitis B panel run to determine whether or not there was a previous infection. If your partner resolved a prior infection, there is no need for vaccination. If your partner is HBsAg neg, HBcAb neg, and HBsAb neg then your partner should be vaccinated. Be sure your little ones get a booster and follow up with an anti-HBs titre test 1-2 months following the booster shot. If they have a titre greater than 10IU/mL, then they have generated adequate immunity.

  3. I was diagnose with hep b positve 2 mnths ago and my wife is negative.my viral load is 248copies/ml . Do I need treatmnt

    1. I would still encourage you to talk to your liver specialist after a complete evaluation. You appear to be in the inactive phase of the virus at this time since your viral load is low. I’m assuming you are HBeAg neg. Please be sure you continue to have regular monitoring of your HBV and regular surveillance for liver cancer. Be sure your wife is vaccinated in case the the status of your HBV infection changes with time. With a low viral load such as 248 cp/ml, treatment with an antiviral would not be recommended.

  4. Hello There!
    Recently While I test my blood, my HBsAg came positive.
    Then I contect with a Dr. He gave me farther test, where my HBe Ag came negative & Anti HBe (HBe Ab) came positive.
    My Sgpt alt is 21 u/l & the nepatobiliary system appears normal.

    My dr. told me to come after 6month later with thise above test & didn’t give me any drug.

    So pls told me I’m i in acute or cronic phase & what does it mean anti hbe ab positive?

    1. Dr. He is asking you to return in 6 months so he can re-test you, At that time, he will be able to determine if you have an acute or chronic infection. Often there are few or no symptoms with HBV so people may not be aware of how long they have been infected. Repeating the test is the best way to confirm one way or the other if you have a new or chronic infection. If it is determined that you have a chronic infection, he’ll run more tests which will give him a better idea if you would be a good candidate for treatment at that time. If you were to have an acute infection, you would not require any medication. While you wait for re-testing, please be sure to take precautions so you do not transmit HBV to others.

  5. I have been Reported HBSag Positive. I have undergone through Testing which are as below, Request u to guide me.
    HBeAg-0.091 (Negative)
    Anti HBeAB – 2.93 (Negative)
    HBV Quantitative Real Time PCR = 35150 Viral Copies /ml 23433 IU/ml EDTA blood

    Doctor Says that Anti HBeAB report should be positive than I can become HBSag (Negitive) is it true?
    Is it curable and how much time it takes to cure.

    Regards,
    Harsh

    1. Do you know if you have an acute (new) or chronic infection? A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg+ for more than 6 months. It appears that you may in the process of serconversion of HBe, where you will lose the HBeAg antigen and gain the antibody. If you have an acute infection, you would likely serconvert and eventually lose surface antigen and gaining the antibody since 90% of healthy adults newly infected will resolve the infection. (Eventual results of a resolved infection: HBsAg neg, HBsAb pos, HBcAb pos, HBeAg neg, HBeAb pos, undetectable viral load). Keep in mind that HBe serconversion is also part of the natural progression of the virus. Those that are chronically infected will eventually seroconvert and lose HBe, but they rarely serconvert and lose the surface antigen (HBsAg) and gain the antibody (HBsAb). So, if you are chronically infected, but serconverting losing HBe, your results may look like the following: HBsAg pos, HBsAb neg, HBeAg neg, HBeAb pos, very low or undetectable HBV DNA (quantitative). You will need to check back with your doctor if you have not confirmed if this is an acute or chronic infection to look at some of your results.

      1. I have exactly what you described here. Does it mean I will still seroconvert HbsAg to HbsAb? I’m a chronic carrier tested in 2011 and 2013. Even now, my HbeAg is negative while my HbeAb is positive. Could I possibly be amongst the lucky 2 percent? Can I work as an obstetrician? Knowing that it involves surgery? Even though I have been told I have the inactive type.

        1. Hello: The definition of a chronic hepatitis B infection is when we continue to test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for many months or years. Losing the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) and developing “e” antibodies is a good step and indicates our immune system is trying to suppress the infection. Hopefully your viral load (HBV DNA) will also decline and you have no signs of liver damage. That is the definition of “inactive” hepatitis B, which is good news for you. However, as you noted, very few people completely lose HBsAg. Your chances clearly improve if you eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes.
          Having hepatitis B should not prevent you from becoming a doctor. Here in the U.S., there are laws in place that prohibit healthcare centers and medical schools from discriminating against students and providers with hepatitis B. However, I know in the Middle East and Asian, some countries do discriminate, unfortunately.
          In the U.S., only if you have a very high viral load, are there any restrictions placed on doctors who perform surgeries where there is high risk of sharp injuries. In that case, antivirals are effective in reducing viral load to allow everyone to practice medicine. Good luck.

      2. Hi. I recently did test and it came back positive for hepatitis b. I believe I am an acute carrier , please advise what drugs do I needs to take as an acute carrier. Please also advise about my AST 29.70 ALT 71.20

        1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Most healthy adults who are infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. This is called an acute infection.
          However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it is considered a chronic infection. It means you were probably infected at birth or during early childhood, when your immature immune system could not fight it.
          Knowing whether your hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. Please get tested again in six months to find out if it’s chronic or acute. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
          Unless you are experiencing serious liver damage, your doctor may hold off from treating you until he or she knows for sure that you have chronic hepatitis B. It is common in cases of acute hepatitis B for your liver enzymes (ALT) to climb above normal. If your doctor recommends treatment, medical guidelines recommend treatment with either tenofovir or entecavir, which are antivirals.
          Until then, get tested again in six months to see if you have acute or chronic hepatitis B. Good luck.

          1. Thank you for the reply. I am actually waiting to get texted again July but I am a bit afraid and seriously hoping to be among the 90 % whose immune systems were able to fight and clear the disease. What could be the reason why most healthy adult with acute hep b could not clear the virus? I have also been using milk thistle and garlic and a lot of fruits. Is it really true that most adult fight of this disease without a single treatment ?

          2. Hello: The reason adults with healthy immune systems are able to clear hepatitis B, is that their immune systems quickly notice the virus and go to work to eradicate it by creating antibodies and T-cells, among others, to destroy the infected liver cells and destroy the hepatitis B viral antigens (proteins) that make up the virus.
            If one’s immune system is weak due to illness, or if you are very young, for some reason your immune system can’t mount an effective defense against the infection and it essentially sets up shop in the liver and churns out so many antigens that the immune system can’t keep up with it. Good luck.

  6. I have been Reported HBSag Positive and also suffered from ascitis. I have undergone through Testing which are as below, Request u to guide me.HBeAg (Negative)
    Anti HBeAB (Negative)
    HBV Quantitative Real Time PCR = 170000000 Viral Copies /ml
    dr.priscribed to take tab. entecavir 0 .25mg daily . albumin level is also low.please tell it will be cured or not

    1. There is no complete cure at this time for HBV. However, entecavir is a very good antiviral and will likely significantly reduce your viral load. You should get some relief from your symptoms as this happens, but give it some time. Your liver function tests should also stabilize. Please be sure to follow the instructions of your liver specialist and be sure to remain on entecavir.

      1. Hello: Absolutely, you can be safely vaccinated at any age. To be fully protected, you need the full three doses of the hepatitis B vaccine. After the first shot, the second shot is administered 30 days later and the third is administered six months after the first shot. If she lives with someone who has hepatitis B, or is in close or intimate contact with someone who does, she can get a blood test one or two months after the third shot just to make sure she has developed enough hepatitis B antibodies to protect her from infection. She can always get a fourth, booster shot if she needs it. Good luck, and congratulations on caring enough to protect her.

  7. Pls sir i had diagnosed Hepatitis B positive in 2009 doctor told me it would be cleared by it’s own , but same thing i tested this year April 2013 i remain Positive after that have done, Hbeag which comes Non reactive , and ALT is normal range, then Viral load test which is 5488 , Pls what can i do is it curable that the virus would leave my blood, or can i use Herbal remedies Treatment cos am scare , Thank you .

    1. You will want to confirm with your liver specialist, but it appears that you have a chronic HBV infection since you continue to test HBsAg+ for years. It also looks like you are HBeAg negative and HBeAb positive, but your viral load is a little high so it is possible that you have HBe negative hepatitis B as a result of a mutation that can occur. Fortunately your ALTs are normal – assuming your ALT is 30 IU/mL or less – this is the new upper limit of normal for men. A liver specialist might like to monitor you more carefully to determine if you would be a good candidate for treatment. There is no complete cure at this time, though there are good treatments. Herbal remedies will not provide you with a cure. Talk to your doctor before taking any herbal remedies. Some can cause more harm then good. Please talk to your doctor.

      1. Yes, you should be good after waiting for the 9 week window period. Now I would encourage you to get the 3 shot vaccine series!

  8. i am having HBsAg on childhood onwards , But i figured it out at the age of 26 .. ! is that curable or what ? me and my sis are twins , when my sisters tested her blood on her delivery then only we knew about it . later i tested my blood , then i can understand that im also having the same problem ! what can i do for it ?

    1. I am sorry to hear about your chronic HBV infection. The best thing you can do is go to a liver specialist who will do a physical examination, take a family history and run blood work to learn more about your HBV infection and your liver health. Based on the results of the tests and possibly the result of an ultrasound, he will determine if you would be a good candidate for treatment at this time. There is no complete cure for HBV, but there are good treatments. Please talk to your doctor and learn more about your HBV and liver health. While you wait, take good care of your liver by avoiding alcohol and smoking. Maintain a healthy weight by eating a well-balanced diet and exercising. Learn more about your HBV so you can take good care of yourself and so you can prevent the transmission of HBV to others – particularly sexual partners and close, household contacts. Please make an appointment with a liver specialist to learn more!

  9. last month i was tested positive with HBV with result HBeAg Negative, HBeAb Positive, HCV Screening Ab Negative.HBV Viral load 92,HBsAg Positive
    pls tell me more about my condition?

    1. You have a current HBV infection. I do not know for sure if it is an acute or chronic infection, though likely a chronic infection. You will want to repeat your hepatitis B panel 6 months after your first test so you can determine if your infection is acute or chronic. If you confirm your infection is chronic you will want to be sure you are monitored by a liver specialist. At this time you do not have hepatitis C. You tested negative for HCV. Please visit our website so you can educate yourself about your HBV infection. http://www.hepb.org.

  10. Two years ago I got a blood test and was diagnosed with hepatitis b. after some more tests, HB Antigen positive, Antibodies positive, PCR positive. After two months regular treatment, I had another test where PCR got negative but HBe Antigen positive, Antibodies positive. then after a year, again I got blood test, ALT normal, everything was normal but HBe antigen was positive. what’s the status now, acute or chronic when my PCR got negative in the second test that I had after almost two months. My basic question is as to what the status of my ailment is when I got my PCR negative. I am not getting any more treatment but use my food with much care…..

    1. The results you list are not clear to me HBeAg vs. HBsAg etc. I’m a little confused. People are rarely treated when they have an acute case of HBV, though on occasion, they require supportive care. If you are still HBeAg positive after 2 years, then you are chronically infected. I would encourage you to see a liver specialist to either interpret current results, or re-run some of your labs in order to clarify. You can have an undetectable viral load with chronic HBV. This normally occurs when patients go into the inactive phase. They are typically HBeAg neg, HBeAb pos, undetectable HBV DNA, and normal ALTs. You will want to confirm what is going on with your liver specialist.

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  12. I tested positive for Hep B recently. The doctor said it was recent within the last 2 weeks to 2-3 months. My boyfriend of two months has been vaccinated, he got tested anyway and he was negative. The person I was with before said he was vaccinated and is going for testing, I don’t know if he’s lying but assuming he’s not, how is it possible I got this? I haven’t been with anyone else and not my ex in over 3 months and no needle sticks or anything. Can I get it from working on a farm or from unclean ppl in the restroom? We have people at work who leave a mess on the toilet seat, not to be gross, but I just don’t know how I could have gotten it so I’m really confused…

    1. HBV is transmitted through direct contact with infected blood or body fluids. Although it is a sexually transmitted disease, it is very effectively transmitted through direct contact with trace amounts of infected blood. HBV can live outside the body for up to a week. Though it is not transmitted casually, you can imagine sharing of personal items – toothbrushes, razors, improperly cleaned piercing, tattoo equipment or even pedicure/manicure equipment could result in transmission of infected blood if not properly disinfected. Many people that contract HBV have no idea how they were initially infected.

  13. i am having chronic hep b s creatinun is
    .75 , pcr quantitative 903, alt 93 , hbe antigen -ve , hbe antibody +ve , anti hiv -ve , hdv rna -ve dr said no need to worry all test r normal and advised Silliver tablets and evion.. . and follow up aftr 2 mnths…

    1. You have HBe negative HBV, though your viral load is still in range where you would likely not receive treatment. However, your ALT is quite elevated. Normal ALT for men is 30 IU/mL and 19 IU/mL for women. I would talk to your doctor so you can determine why your ALT is elevated to this level. See how it looks in 2 months as you doctor suggests and if it’s still elevated then talk about getting additional testing to see why it is elevated. It can be affected by many different things.

  14. I have HBs Ag( mild & hybernation) for 10 years , but i would like pass through a medical blood test without HBs Ag in doctor report .Is there any way out , i can shield HBs Ag during the test

    1. I’m glad to hear that you are in an inactive phase of the virus, assuming you are HBe negative and have a very low or undetectable HBV DNA. Please continue to be monitored by your doctor. Unfortunately there is no way to force or make the HBsAg blood test be negative or non-reactive even if you are in the inactive phase of the virus. However, 1% to 2% of those chronically infected will spontaneously seroconvert per year. Hopefully you will be one of those.

  15. We got married six month ago & recently my spouse (28yr) diagnosed as Hepatitis B positive. Test Results as follows:- HBsAg: Positive/Reactive; HBV DNA Quantitative, Real Time PCR: 378 IU/mL (Conversion factor: 1 IU/mL = 5.82 cpoies/mL); Anti-HBc: 0.09 (Non Reactive / Not Detected); HBeAg: 0.27 (Non Reactive / Not Detected); Hepatitis Be Antibody (Anti-HBe): 0.02 (Non Reactive / Not Detected).
    My Test Results:- Hepatitis B Surface Antigen, Serum (Rapid) HBsAg: Non-Reactive; Hepatitis B Surface Antibodies, Quantitative HBS (QUANT): 587.8 mIU/mL [High > or = 10.0 (Reactive)].
    May I seek your kind advice for our future planning with respect to family, health & diet?
    Recently spouse’s mother’s Hepatitis B Surface Antigen, Serum (Rapid) HBsAg Test Result documented as REACTIVE.

    1. It is likely that your spouse got HBV from her mother at birth or early childhood since they are both HBV+. It looks like you were infected wtih HBV, likely from your wife, but like 90% of healthy adults, you were able to resolve the virus on your own. You no longer need to worry about getting HBV since you have HBV antibodies protecting you from ever getting HBV again. your wife needs to continue with regular monitoring by her liver specialist. Her viral load is quite low. I’m not sure if she’s in the process of serconverting. She has lost HBeAg, but she has not yet gained the HBeAb antibody. Monitoring is important to follow the path of the virus and her liver health. When your wife is pregnant, she needs to be monitored. At birth please be sure your baby is able to get a shot of HBIG and the first shot of the HBV vaccine within 12 hours of birth. This is an effective way to prevent transmission from HBV+ mom to her baby. If your wife’s viral load elevates significantly, then she needs to talk to her liver specialist. As for lifestyle changes, be sure your wife avoids alcohol and smoking. Alcohol is particularly bad for those with HBV and smoking is an independent risk factor for liver cancer. Be sure she maintains a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet. Don’t forget about exercise. Studies continue to show the importance of exercise.

      1. i want to plieas ask if i am chronically infected with hepatitis b and my husband is acute does he stand a chance of getting choronically infectedif we have unprotected sex

        1. Hello: Most healthy adults who are infected with hepatitis B are able to clear the infection over a six-month period. They do not become chronically infected unless they have a weak immune system. If he is experiencing an acute infection, make sure he is tested six months after his first test that was hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive to see if he has cleared the infection.
          One last thought, it is harder for a man to catch hepatitis B from an infected woman, than it is for a woman to catch hepatitis B from an infected man during unprotected sex because she is on the receiving end of semen, which carries the virus. Good luck.

  16. Hi,
    I was diagnose before with chronic hep b. i got my treatment of entecavir 2008. By 2011 my hbv dna was undetecdable with viral load 30 copies that was 2011 And this year my hbeag was negative and hb e antibody is positive. But i had a test lately.

    Hbsag – positive
    Hb surface antibody – positive
    Antibody core antigen – negative
    Hbeag – negative
    Hb e antibody – positive

    I am confused of my hbsag and hb surface antibody because they were all positive. Can you please help me to interpret this? Cant wait to see my specialist in january. My speacilist gave me a medical certificate that im doing well now.

    1. It is good when you serconvert and lose HBeAg and gain the HBeAb antibody. This is especially good if have a very low or undetectable viral load. At this time, you remain HBsAg positive, but you currently have surface antibody. It’s possible you are in the process serconverting, which would be great, but you need to check back and see if you lose the HBsAg antigen and gain the antibody and also very important, you will want to check with your liver specialist to see if you have a viral load at this time. If you were to resolve your HBV, you would be: HBsAg negative, HBsAb positive, HBeAg negative, HBeAb positive, HBV DNA undetectable. Wait a few months before you are re-tested.

  17. Im diagnosed of hbsag reactive this month june 2013 and anti hbsag > 0.26 i was really confused because I was vaccinated last 2009 in hepa b.why is it i was infected with his virus still im vaccinated. Im so worried about my situation because im pregnant in 4 months.how I would know that my status will be chronic or acute.do I take some medicine while im pregnant? Pls. Let me know.

    1. Because you are HBsAg+ and you are pregnant, I would encourage you to see a liver specialist so he can quickly look into your HBV and your liver health. Be sure to let them know you are pregnant. it is likely you had hepatitis B before you were vaccinated. The vaccine does not help those that already have an HBV infection. People are not usually tested for HBV prior to vaccination. If you test HBsAg positive for longer than 6 months then you are considered chronically infected. You can also ask your doctor to run an anti-HBc IgM test which if positive would indicate that you have an acute, new infection. Regardless, proper followup is important. I don’t know if you will require medication or not. This is more dependent on the HBV DNV viral load. It is very important to talk to your doctor to be sure your baby receives the first shot of the HBV vaccine series and a shot of HBIG within 12 hours of birth. I don’t know where you live, but if you live outside of the US, you may need to arrange to get the HBIG shot and the vaccine to be given at the hospital. This is a very effective prophylaxis for babies of HBV positive moms and prevents transmission from HBV+ moms to their little ones at birth 90-95% of the time. There would only be concern if you have a very high viral load. Please try not to panic, but please contact your doctor, and contact a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and your liver health. Making sure your baby is able to receive the first shot of the HBV vaccine series and a shot of HBIG is essential before you deliver your baby. Best of luck to you!

  18. one of my relative is newly diagnosed with HBsag reactive.she is having symptoms like tiredness,bloated stomach,nausea and vomiting.is she contagious and is it cureable.?she is 58 years old.her mother died of liver cirrhosis at the age of 52 and her brother has chronic hbv.is there any genetic factors behind this.pls reply

    1. I would encourage you to have your relative seen by a liver specialist to learn more about her HBV and liver health. This is particularly important since her mother died of liver cirrhosis and her brother also has chronic HBV. There is a good chance she has been chronically infected with HBV and may have been infected at birth. Transmission from HBV+ mother to baby is very common. It is not a genetically passed disease. It is acquired through direct contact with infected blood and body fluids, which of course is very common during childbirth. In many parts of the world, this is the most common form of HBV transmission. What may be hereditary is a tendency towards advanced disease or the development of liver cancer. If HBV has been passed from one family member to another and a number of them have developed liver cancer, that increases the odds that other infected family members would be more susceptible to liver cancer. Please encourage your family member to see a liver specialist.

      1. Good day,

        Pls. kindly advise about test result Anti – HBc > 10.0. I understand that its possitive, but number 10 says samthing? What other tests will be need to done?
        Thank You,
        Best regards

        1. Hello: When you are infected with hepatitis B, one of the first antibodies that your immune system produces to fight the infection is the hepatitis B core antibody. If this antibody is found in a blood test, it means you were exposed at some point in your life. You need to find out if you are currently infection or have a resolved infection. Talk to your doctor and ask for a blood test for the hepatitis B surface antigen and antibody. This should clarify if your body has cleared the infection, which would be indicated by a positive test result for the hepatitis B surface antibody. Good luck.

  19. I was gone through the medical test in 2007 and the report was unfit due to HBs Ag positive, and i got married last year, recently i tested for my wife and the result was HBsAg Negative. so do i need to take any precaution for protect my spouse from HBV. please advise.

    1. I would encourage you to have a hepatitis B panel (one blood test with 3 results, HBsAg, HBcAb and HBsAb). This will tell you if you currently have chronic HBV or if you resolved an acute case in 2007. There is a safe and effective vaccine to protect against HBV and I would be sure your wife and any children are vaccinated to protect them against HBV.

  20. Hello,
    My new work was pending because my Hepa Screening appeared reactive, I was advised to take the hepa profile and these where my results . HBsAG-II = 4208 – REACTIVE, ANTI HBS =2.00 – NEGATIVE, ANTI-HBC IGG=0.008 – REACTIVE, ANTI-HAV IGM=0.354-NEGATIVE, HBeAg=967.90 – REACTIVE, ANTI-HBE 4.870 – NEGATIVE. Based on the result my doctor told me I am an acute carrier and highly infectious. I just want to ask if whether I am really an acute Hepa B patient, not chronic? She said that my condtion is just starting, I am currently taking the meds she prescribed, Hepamin and Zeffix Lamivudine. I will be back after 6 months for another screening. Can you tell me any insight basing from my result? How can you know that a Hepa B just started and it’s acute? Please help me. Thanks

    1. I cannot say for sure whether you have an acute or chronic infection. Did you go to the doctor because you were experiencing symptoms, or were you concerned that you might have possibly been exposed to HBV? I would encourage you to have your liver enzymes tested, and possibly get an HBV DNA test.

    2. Hi my boyfriend diagnose in acute hepatitis b, bub
      t its been 1 month and two weeks. The symptoms still not gone what is problem of very slow recover?

  21. I went to the doctor because my medical examination appeared that I’m Hepa B reactive. I am not aware that I was Hepa B reactive though and was not experiencing any symptoms. She just said I am highly infectious acute carrier and that the virus had just infected my system and should take the meds. I was not fit to work, not after 6 months.

  22. im recently given hepa test and result as follows; HBsAg non reactive, HBsAb reactive. cn you please tell men of my condition and what are suppose to be done.

    1. Currently you are not infected with hepatitis B, and you do show immunity to HBV (positive HBsAb). Immunity can be from a resolved previous infection or through vaccination. The hepatitis B panel is a good way to learn about HBV – whether you have or had an infection and if you are not infected, do you have immunity and how did you get that immunity. I can’t say how you generated immunity, but I can tell you your current test shows you are not infected and that you are protected. Congratulations!

    1. I don’t know anything about your history – previously HBV + or not? Anyway, if your anti-HBs or HBsAb is reactive, then you have immunity to hepatitis B. There would be no need for you to get the vaccine if you have already generated immunity to hepatitis B, whether you did so due to a resolving a previous infection or due to vaccination.

  23. so i need to run a hepa profile so that i will know exactly where did i got that immunity? what are suppose to be the results to determine that im not affected considering that my HBsAb is reactive? i got shots when i was a baby but my mom’s not sure if completed or not and if for hepa or not cause my records are lost.

    1. Yes. If your results are HBsAg negative, HBcAb positive and HBsAb positive, then you have immunity because you resolved a previous infection. If your results are HBsAg negative, HBcAb negative and HBsAb positive, then your immunity is from a hepatitis B vaccination series. If you are HBsAg positive, then you need to see your doctor because it would mean that you currently have a hepatitis B infection.

  24. my husband is HBsAG positive. his hepa profile is normal.
    blood reports are normal. urine reports are normal. now has he take HBV vaccine?

    1. If your husband is HBsAg+ then the HBV vaccine will do him no good. He is still infected with HBV. I would encourage your husband to see a liver specialist. All chronic HBV carriers should be monitored regularly and screened for liver cancer.

      1. Hi
        What does it mean
        SGOT 29 (5-45), HBsAg:NEGATIVE
        SGPT 15 (5-40), HBsAb:POSITIVE
        Thank you

  25. Lately my husband is diagnosed with hepa b surface antigen 2 is it chronic or acute. Also last year I did my hepa test and its all negative and doctor told me I have my immunity for hepa.I have my vaccination in 4 shots. My question is now that my husband is diagnosed with hepa do you think I will still aquire it even I have immunity. Thanks and waiting for your reply

    1. If your husband remains HBsAg+ for greater than 6 months, then he would be considered chronically infected. He can also suggest that his doctor run an anti-HBc IgM test, which when positive usually means it is an acute case. The HBV vaccine is normally a 3 shot series, but maybe you were given a booster. If you wish to confirm immunity, ask your doctor to run an anti-HBs titre test. If your result is greater than 10 IU/mL then you are protected. If you do not show immunity do not panic. You can get a booster shot and have the doctor repeat the titer test 1-2 months following the booster.

  26. my friend age 17 years, has HBVsAg +ve .
    how to know if it is acute or chronic(which test).
    a HBV +ve patient should marry or not .

    1. HBV often has no symptoms, so he will need to get additional blood work to determine if he is acutely or chronically infected. Often the HBsAg test is re-run over time. If a person tests HBsAg+ for greater than 6 months then they are diagnosed as being chronically infected. He can also ask his doctor to run an anti-HBc IgM test which will tell him if the infection is acute or new infection. While he waits he wants to be sure to avoid transmission to others. HBV is transmitted through direct contact with infected blood and body fluids. Keep open cuts, etc. covered and practice safe sex. Fortunately HBV is a vaccine preventable disease, so it is totally preventable. HBV should not keep your friend from getting married if he learns he has a chronic infection. He just needs to be sure his partner is vaccinated. While he waits he should also take good care of his liver by avoiding all alcohol or smoking. If he learns he has a chronic infection, he should make an appointment to see a liver specialist so he learn more about his HBV and his liver health. Please assure him that those living with chronic HBV can live a full life. However regular monitoring by a liver specialist and following the recommendations of the specialist is important.

    1. I would encourage you to talk to your doctor. You first need to determine if this is an acute infection (new) or if it is a chronic infection. If you test HBsAg+ for greater than 6 months then it is considered a chronic infection. If you learn you are chronically infected, you will want to make an appointment with a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and your liver health. A thorough evaluation and regular monitoring for those with HBV is very important.

  27. My husband has just been diagnosed with hapa b, I was vassicinated few days ago and I have another appointment next month. My question is can we make babies cos we had nothing yet we just got married

    1. Your husband’s HBV will not prevent you from having children, but you will want to be sure to have protected sex until you have completed the vaccine series. You might also wish to confirm immunity by having an anti-HBs titer test run 1 month following the last shot of the series. Please be sure your husband see a liver specialist to learn more about his HBV and liver health.

  28. Lately my husband is diagnosed with hapa b, his liver test was fine, he shedulled an appiontment with a specialist for next month.I was vaccinated few days ago another appointment next month. My question is we just got married,can we still make babies? Cos our doctor said we should start using condom so as not to get infected. Pls i need urgent reply

    1. I agree with your liver specialist… Be sure to have protected sex, using a condom, until you have completed the vaccine series.

      1. Hii was once diagnosed to be have hepatitis surface antigen positive but I ignore it then recently I went to an interview and I diagnosed positive for a second Time but not up till six months so I the asked me to get it treated before I can get the job. So if I have chronic HBV is there a possibility that I will ever be tested negative again in my life?

        1. Hello: As you may know, when healthy adults are infected, their immune systems are usually able to clear the infection within six months. When newborns and young children are infected, their immature immune systems don’t recognize the virus and a chronic infection occurs that can last many years, even a lifetime.
          I hope your infection turns out to be an acute, or short-term one. If not, please get monitored regularly, eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. good luck.

  29. Goodmorning from Greece,

    I just had my 3 month (13weeks) post exposure results -insertive anal exposure , condom failure, source was HEP B positive and HIV+:

    1)HIV 1-2(Biomerieux):NEGATIVE 0.05…<0.25negative
    (4th generation test)
    I think this is final and i should stop worrying about HIV. Do you agree?

    2)Anti-HCV: NEGATIVE 0.06index… <0.8 negative
    Is this final for HCV? Do i need to test again?

    3)HBsAg: NEGATIVE 0.2index… <0.80 negative
    HBsAb: NEGATIVE 10 U/I … <10 negative
    I am not 100% confident about this result. Considering:
    a) i had an HBIG injection 5 hours after exposure and the first shot of the HEP B vaccine at the same time, and
    b) second shot of HEP B vaccine one month afterwards (2months before testing)…shouldn't the HBsAb result be positive or above 100 or 1000 U/I?
    The microbiologist who performed the test just told me that everything is ok…nothing more, even though i explained my situation in detail.
    I was tested HEP B negative and HBsAb negative on the day of exposure and 3 months (13 weeks) after the exposure. I also had many Hep B-negative results in the past.
    Do you think my Hep B results are normal or i should be worried?

    Thanks in advance for your time and valuable help?

    1. I would encourage you to get counseling for STDs. I cannot comment on the post exposure protocol for HCV and HIV. There is a 4-6 week window following the exposure where you might not test positive for hepatitis B if you had been exposed and infected. However, after 3 months, no additional possible exposures and adequate prophylaxis, you should be good. Your test results show you are HBsAg negative. At this time you do not appear to have adequate immunity to HBV, though you should wait one month after the last shot of the vaccine series to confirm immunity. 1-2 months after the last shot, have the doctor re-run an anti-HBs titer to see if you have adequate immunity. I don’t think you need to worry about being infected at this time, but I do agree you want to confirm your immunity following the complete HBV vaccine series.

  30. Hi I have just been diagnosed with acute hepatitis B I’m really scared I want to to everything thing plausible over the next 6 months to help my body fight it please tell me all the things I should to to help prevent myself becoming chronic as I would not be able to live with my self if I became chronic I have no support network so please what can I do to help my body thanks

    1. I’m sorry to hear of your acute HBV infection. The good news is that 90% or more of healthy adults newly infected with HBV will clear the infection. Few require any sort of treatment or care. Monitoring may be all that is needed. However, if you experience difficult symptoms, be sure to call your doctor. (Jaundice, severe vomiting, diarrhea, swollen abdomen are concerning symptoms) While you wait to clear your infection, do NOT drink alcohol. Be careful with prescription or over the counter drugs. Tylenol in particular should be taken only as directed. Eat a healthy diet, drink plenty of water and don’t’ be afraid to exercise moderately. Think healthy and you will be good. Be sure to follow up with your doctor for testing to confirm you have cleared the infection.

    2. There is no way to ensure that you will clear your acute HBV infection, however, certainly taking good care of your liver health is very important Be sure that you avoid alcohol and smoking during this time and take care with any prescription or over the counter medications. Ask your doctor or pharmacist you have specific questions about medications you are taking. Be sure to avoid alcohol in particular and focus on eating a healthy diet filled with vegetables, fruits, whole grains and limited lean meats. Remember that you are infectious to others at this time so take care to avoid transmission to others. Please be sure to repeat testing with your doctor to be sure you have cleared your infection. Fortunately, 90% of healthy adults that are newly infected will clear the infection on their own without intervention

  31. Congratulations on your wonderful and very informatvie site.
    I have a question to ask, and thankyou in advance for any advice in this matter.
    If a person has been infected recently (2-4months) is it possible to tip the balance in your favor to seroconvert, or to stop the acute HepB from becoming chronic, we are told that 90% of healthy individuals will fight off the virus with 6months or so if their immune system is strong, so I was thinking – Could a person ‘beef up’ their immune system by taking certain herbs like milk thistle, dandelion, turmeric, licorice etc and eating foods that protect and dont hurt the liver, avoid alcohol, drugs, sugar etc, sweating to take the load off the liver and really do as much as ou can in that 6 months or so, could a person stack the odds in his favor to get the virus to stop at that, just an acute infection?
    Another question is, if a person has gone through vaccination and is an ‘non-responder’ can they also be one of the 90% and not get to the chronic stage or are they more likely to be chronic? Ithink even nonresponders do have at least some small amount of natural immunity to hebB.
    Thankyou so much for your help. Very nice website and good work you are doing.

    1. There is no way to ensure you will clear an acute infection, though 90% or more of healthy adults that are truly newly infected will clear the virus without any medical intervention. However, it is important to take good care of your liver while you wait for further testing. Do NOT drink alcohol since this can be a dangerous combination. Be careful with any prescription or OTC medications. Take only as directed or speak with your doctor or pharmacist if you have specific questions. Avoid junk food, and processed foods and stick to healthy foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains and limited lean meats. There is no study data to confirm this, but it just makes sense to be as good to your liver as possible. You don’t want to make your liver work harder or take alcohol or drugs that cause damage to the liver. I don’t’ think you necessarily need supplements since quality, content etc. varies, but eat healthy food and cook with spices that are good for the liver – turmeric and cinnamon. Don’t forget to be sure to exercise too – especially if you have an exercise routine.
      I don’t believe there have been specific studies to indicate whether a non-responder is more likely to not clear an acute infection. The term non-responder is sometimes mistaken too – remember that it is 2 complete series of the HBV vaccine series before a person is considered a non-responder. Think positively and take good care of your health!

  32. i was diagnosed that im infected with hepatitis b, i go to another doctor to try another test, the doctor made some test then he said im positive, he said comeback after 6 months why he said that.. i was confused because 2010 i am not infected 2012 when i’ve got my new job they said that i have hepatitis b it shows on my medical..please help me..now i’m scared

    1. Please try not to be scared. It sounds like you have an acute infection. 90% of healthy adults that are infected while they are adults will clear a new or acute HBV infection. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg+ for more than 6 months. That is why your doctor wants you to return in 6 months to be sure you have cleared the infection. Please keep in mind that you are infectious at this time. Be sure to avoid transmission by avoiding direct contact with blood or infected body fluids. Keep cuts, sores, etc covered and please have safe sex with partners if they have not been vaccinated to protect them from HBV. Avoid sharing personal items such as razors, toothbrushes etc – anything that might have trace amounts of blood. While you wait, be sure you do NOT drink alcohol and avoid smoking. Eat a healthy diet and take care of your general health. Please be sure to return to your doctor in 6 months for testing.

    2. Your doctor wants to retest you to see if you have an acute (new) HBV infection or a chronic infection. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. 90% of healthy adults that are newly infected will clear the infection within 6 months, but you must repeat testing to confirm. While you wait, please take care to not transmit the virus to others and take care of your liver health by avoiding alcohol, smoking, and be sure to eat healthy and take care with any prescription or over the counter medications. Once again, repeat testing…

  33. i am a HB sag positive fom last 2 decades.i am 35 yrs old now ,there is no any symptoms yet, can you tell me what are the survival chances of an chronic HB sag positive people like me . can i live a normal life.

    1. HBV is a non complaining disease. Someone chronically infected may have few or no symptoms for decades. it is good that you are aware of your HBV and able to carefully evaluated and regularly monitored by a liver specialist. If treatment is recommended then get treatment. Otherwise continue monitoring and be sure you make healthy lifestyle choices – no alcohol, no smoking and maintaining a healthy weight with a well balanced diet and regular exercise. Most who have chronic HBV live very full lives. Do not let your chronic HBV get in the way of living your life to the fullest.

  34. Hi,

    I believe I was knowingly infected by a previous partner and am having a hard time accepting this. I was diagnosed in October and was hospitalised where my bilirubin levels increased to 295 and my LFT to 2000. I was severely jaundiced and it took me a good two or three months to fully recover.
    I am due my check up on Monday and am scared that I have not cleared the virus. I had blood tests taken in March and the antigens were positive but the Hep B was also still present. My recent bloods were taken a month after the others.
    I guess I wonder if there is a system that stops horrible people who spread the disease. I know here in the UK if someone knowingly spread HIV this can be treated as manslaughter as it is so severe. However, there should be similar (obviously not as severe) rights for people who have been infected with Hep B.

    We used a condom but this broke and, as you are during the throws of passion, it was forgotten about. I know I am responsible for this (I have chastised myself enough for my own stupidity), however, it did not enter my head for a second that this person would be so careless and dishonest.

    Any advice would be welcomed.

    1. I am very sorry to hear of your situation. It is very unfortunate. Can you tell me if you have or had an acute HBV infection or a flare up of a chronic infection? If it is an acute infection then you may have cleared the virus. Hopefully this is the case. You must be sure to follow up and check. I don’t know when this exposure happened to your sexual partner, but there is prophylaxis to prevent transmission to the partner if administered within 48 hours. This includes a shot of the HBV vaccine and a shot of HBIG. Your friend should wait 4-6 weeks to be tested since there is a incubation period of the virus.

  35. Hi, i am a doctor which got residency in middle east recently. As a part of medical check up i did all the test, unfortunately i got positive in HBSAG. I am shocked , all my future carrier will going to end soon. I took advice from my senior consultant n did some other test like uUSG abdomen, LFT, platelets. All r normal. Is there any way to get rid of this HBSAG POSITIVE?? Plz give me some valuable advice sir

    1. I am sorry to hear of your hepatitis B diagnosis. I know this can cause a problem as a doctor working in the Middle East. Unfortunately there is no treatment that will ensure that you will lose HBsAg and gain the antibody. Most of the treatments currently available work by controlling the virus. Immune modulators may sometimes result in a loss of HBe, but you would likely not fit the criterion for treatment, or respond, since your ALT levels are normal. Do you know if you are HBeAg negative or positive? I would encourage you to learn more. You also want to know your HBV DNA – viral load. This reflects how infectious you are, which of course is important working in health care. Please note these links that direct you to the updated CDC recommendations for the management of HBV infected health care workers and students: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6103a1.htm Here is another link to last years Department of Justice settlement which now makes HBV covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) p://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2013/March/13-crt-271.html You might be able to make a case for yourself with these recommendations in the US.This is very important to those living with chronic HBV in the US that wish to train and work in health care.

  36. Im 17 years old.. ive been tested 1year ago. And now ive been tested again .. and still reactive of this HBsAg … 🙁 sadly im a chronically infected of this HBV ….

    And i dont have any idea where i get this.. im not dringking … my liver is good … i dont still sex … sadly im not immune when i was a child … my mother and father is negative … 🙁 i dont know before if they are reactive too… but now heres my result before and now…. please help me …

    HbsAg 942.80 reactive
    Anti-HBs <2.00 non reactive
    Anti-HAV Igm 0.33
    Anti-HBc Total 0.01 reactive
    HbeAg 930.70 reactive
    Anti-HBe 5.27 non reactive

    And now… these is now my result after 1 year…

    HBsAg 850.1 reactive
    Anti-HBs 0.1 non-reactive

    ….. that is my result .. hope .. that you can help me . An advice … thank you. 🙁 im confused…

    1. I’m very sorry to hear of your chronic HBV infection. I know this is very unsettling to hear at the age of 17, but it is better that you know so you are able to make healthy lifestyle choices that can positively impact your liver and general health. Most of those chronically infected were infected at birth or early childhood. Babies and children are particularly vulnerable to HBV. Because there are often few or no symptoms for decades, they are unaware of the infection until it is found as a result of routine blood work or during a blood donation later in life.

      At this time you are HBeAg positive which means you are in a more infectious stage of the virus. This is very typical for young people with HBV who tend to have high viral loads and normal liver function tests. At some point you will likely move into a less infectious stage of the virus, but you will not know without monitoring. I would encourage you find a pediatric liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and liver health. You do not mention your ALT/AST and other liver function tests so I am assuming they are within normal ranges, but you want to be sure. I would also ask that your liver specialist run an HBV DNA or viral load test. This thorough evaluation and regular monitoring of your HBV and liver health is a very important habit to establish.

      Please know that HBV is not transmitted casually, but it is spread through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. This means that HBV is also a sexually transmitted disease. You will want to be sure to practice safe sex using a condom until your sexual partner has been vaccinated. We are very fortunate to have the HBV vaccine to protect those we love and live with. Be sure your parents and siblings are screened and vaccinated. Take care to keep personal items away from others to avoid the inadvertent sharing of items that may have trace amounts of blood on them such as razors, toothbrushes, nail clippers, body jewelry, etc .

      You are young and will want to make healthy lifestyle choices that benefit your liver and general health. Please be sure to avoid alcohol which is a dangerous combination with chronic HBV. Do not smoke. Take care with prescription and over the counter drugs that may be harsh on the liver. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have specific questions. Take care with your diet and maintain a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise. Most importantly, find a liver specialist you like and be sure you are thoroughly evaluated and monitored regularly. At some point you may require treatment, or you may not. Please know that most with HBV live long, full lives with careers, friends, family and love. Take simple precautions, follow the advice of your liver specialist, but live your life to the fullest!

  37. Thank you so much sir. I feel alive again. 🙂 your a big help… i was young now… and i will now start a healthy lifestyle as you say.. 🙂 thank you for the advice sir. Honestly your advice is a big help to me. :’) …

    One question sir… is it possibly that i was infected trough breast feeding in the others breast…

    Before my mom says . I was breast feeded before in my godmothers breast… and sadly the child of hers is a HBsAg positive too. How sad. 🙁

    tommorow sir. I will go to the liver specialist for the check up. 🙂 thank you so much sir…

    I will just update you sir of my result .. 🙂 hope you can check on me too.

    1. HBV is transmitted through infected blood and body fluids. It is present in breast milk, but in a much,much lower concentration. CDC says the benefits of breast feeding outweigh any risks. However, if the woman breast feeding had cracked skin at the nipples that might allow for even trace amounts of blood, then the likelihood of transmission would be very possible – especially if you were not vaccinated to protect you against HBV as a baby (birth dose). Anyway, it is impossible to say, but certainly possible. You could also get HBV transmitted horizontally from another infected people as a result of tiny open sores, bites etc.that might have trace amounts of blood. I would encourage you to tell others that they can break the cycle of transmission by ensuring their babies are given a birth dose of the HBV vaccine within 12-24 hours of birth, followed by the other 2 shots of the series according to schedule. Pregnant women should also be screened to learn if they are HBV positive since there is excellent prophylaxis to prevent transmission from mother to baby. check out our website at http://www.hepb.org and follow us on Facebook to follow what is going on with HBV. Good luck at the liver specialist.

      1. iam positive for hepatitis b(chronic) . My baby age is 5 years 6months.her anti Hbs is 74iu/ml. Whether she is in safe. H.how long this value protects her. When again vaccine has to give. Any booster dose is needed. Please answer me..

        1. Hello: I answered this already, but as long as her hepatitis B surface antibodies are above 10 mIU/mL, she is protected and does not require any booster doses of vaccine. Good luck.

  38. sir i m very thinkfull to u if u help me sir i m patient of hepatitus b from last 8 month
    my test reports are as follow
    ALT 65
    AST 36
    HBV quantitative by PCR 207 IU/ml 705copies/ml
    my said i hv no need to worry reccomend me silliver tab and hepatovit
    plz ans me i m very thankful to you

    1. Your HBV DNA is low so you would most likely not benefit from antiviral treatment at this time. However, your ALT is elevated. ALT levels are 30 IU/mL or lower for men or 19 IU/mL or lower for women. I would take a look at your lifestyle and see if you can make some changes that can bring down your ALT levels. Remember to avoid all alcohol, avoid smoking, and maintain a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise. Try that for a few months and have your ALT/AST retested. Also take a look at prescription or over the counter medications you may be taking as some can be hard on the liver. If you are eating a well balanced diet, you may not need the supplements that have been suggested. You never know about the content or the quality of unregulated supplements.

  39. Hello!
    Thanks so much for sharing this information. It really helped me understand more about Hepa B, as well as the conversations here.

    I just wanted to clarify something and I know you can help me becuase I’m really confused right now. My wife and I got married two months ago. We discovered that we were both HbsAg reactive when we went for check up a few days ago. We assumed that she is chronically infected since her mother and siblings were positive, too. So we concluded that I sexually got the infection from my wife. The doctor asked me to see him after 6 months for another screening and to see if my body will flush or get rid of the virus.

    Now, my question is, do we NEED to stop having intercourse for now to help my body get rid of the virus? Or will stopping sexual intercourse with my wife for six months do any good for my body to be able to flush out the virus? I know I might sound crazy but I’m really confused right now. We just got married and at this time we find a bit hard to control ourselves when it comes to sex. I’m also wondering if using condom is really effective since the virus is also transmitted through vaginal secretions, which can’t be avoided during sexual intercourse.

    I hope you got my point here. I’m sorry for my bad English, but I really hope you understood what I was trying to say. My wife and I are really confused right now. I hope to get an answer from you soon. Thank you!

    1. I would agree that your wife was likely infected at birth or early childhood. This is most common for those chronically infected. If you were not previously HBV positive then you were likely infected during sexual intercourse. Since you are both HBsAg positive, there is no reason you cannot continue to have unprotected sex. It will not make a difference to you. Most healthy adults (90% or more) who are acutely infected with HBV will clear the virus within 6 months with no need for medications. Take care to not transmit HBV to others during this time through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids and be sure to avoid all alcohol at this time. Take care with prescription medications or even over the counter medications that are harsh on the liver. Make sure you revisit your doctor to confirm you have cleared your HBV infection.

  40. 2013 my doctor say I was having Hepb but now is not there 2014 I test Hepatitis core.as tot pos hepatitis b core as.igm neg hepatitis b surf._ah. A u _ ah neg hiv as 1+2 neg please sir I need your help also my doctor said I cannot give my new boyfriend but we have sex without condom I am afraid I do want he to have it god please help me what can I do thanks I am waiting for your reply

    1. It sounds like you had an acute or new HBV infection. 90% or more of healthy adults that are newly infected with HBV will actually clear the virus – nearly all without the need for any medications or supportive treatments. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. Please be sure that you are HBsAg negative, HBcAb (Total) positive and HBsAb positive. IF this is the case then you are no longer infectious because you have cleared your infection so you will not pass your infection onto your boyfriend. However, if you were involved while you were infected then he should be tested.

  41. Sir,i tested my blood and i got hepatitis b some tests results are SGPT-24 and ultrasound test has done and liver normal in size with diffuse fatty infiltration and the blood has been sent to lab for further tests i got doubt regarding fatty liver if fatty liver occurs is it a symptom of chronic

    1. Are you sure you have hepatitis B? If you are HBsAg positive, then you currently have an HBV infection. Your ALT/SGPT is within normal ranges which are 30 IU/mL or less for men and 19 Iu/mL for women. Your ultrasound tells you that you have fatty liver disease. You will want to make an effort to make healthier lifestyle choices. Be sure you are avoiding all alcohol and choose foods that are healthy and be sure to add regular exercise to your life. If you have both HBV and fatty liver then you will want to take care since both diseases can cause damage to the liver and both increase your risk for liver cancer. Please talk to your doctor in more detail about your test results.

      1. sir,
        thank you very much for your valuable reply and
        please tell me the diet for fatty liver reduction.
        is there any possibilty to reduce fatty liver by using proper diet and avoiding alchohol

          1. if you are currently HBV positive then you will not benefit from vaccination. However, sexual partners and household contacts are encouraged to be vaccinated in order to protect them from getting hepatitis B. The vaccine series is a 3-shot series and is as follows: shot 1 – day 0, Shot 2- 1 month, shot 3 – 6 months. the time in between shots and the series can be extended but the intervals cannot be shortened. Be sure there are at least 8 weeks between shot 2 and 3 and 4 months between shot 1 and 3. take a look at this blog and follow the link to the appropriate schedule: http://wp.hepb.org/?p=1486

        1. The concern with fatty liver disease is comparatively new so there are no real guidelines at this time. However, maintaining a healthy weight through diet and regular exercise is advised. Always avoid alcohol. Avoid fast foods and processed foods and meats. Avoid refined sugars found in soda, and sweets. Avoid fatty, fried foods. Focus on eating plenty of vegetables and fruits and limited lean meats, nuts, whole grains etc.

  42. sir today i got the report of hbeag in that the value is 0.32 which is negative what it means

    1. Most who are HBeAg are in a less active phase of the virus. It’s difficult for me to track the conversation thread, so I am not sure of your HBV DNA viral load, though I recall you have fatty liver disease. Please take care with your liver health.

  43. Hepatitis b surf _ ag. (Au_ag) neg hepatitis b core as.igm neg this is17_06_ 2013 but now 21_01 _2014 my doctor told me I have hepaptitie b core as.tot pos hepatitis b core as.igm neg hepatitis b surf _ ah. (Au_ag) him told me I Don’t have it anymore I can’t give it to my boyfriend we slept together without condom I am worry I Don with him to have it my liver is ok I don’t no what to do I have never be treated but I am ok please help me thanks

    1. You are HBsAg neg, HBcAb IgM neg, HBcAb Total pos. You do not mention if you are HBsAb positive or negative. If you are HBsAg neg, HBcAb Total pos, and HBsAb positive then you have recovered from a previous hepatitis B infection. If you are no longer infected then you do not need to worry about infecting your boyfriend. Once again, compare your results with what I noted above.

  44. Please if I may ask what is d meaning of hepatitis b core as.tot pos? Please I need answer to that I am scared thanks I am waiting for your reply .

    1. The HBcAb Total is read in relation to HBsAg and HBsAb. If a person is HBsAg positive, HBcAb Total positive, and HBsAb negative, then they have a current HBV infection. If a person is HBsag negative, HbcAb Total positive and HBsAb positive then they were previously infected with hepatitis B and resolved the infection. They cannot be infected with HBV again and they will not infect others if this is the case.

  45. sir
    today i got the report in that the hbeag value 0.32,HBG DNA not detected is this acute or chronic

    1. You mentioned this before. HBeAg pos/neg does not tell you if your infection is acute or chronic. It indicates how infectious a person is at this time – particularly when looked at in combination with the HBV DNA test. Your doctor may be able to give you more information about whether or not you have an acute or chronic infection. However, if a person is HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then they are considered chronically infected. You can ask your doctor to run an anti-HBc IgM which when positive may indicated an acute infection, though sometimes this may be positive in a person chronically infected with a flare. While you wait to learn if you have an acute or chronic infection. Take care not to transmit HBV to others. Avoid direct contact with infected blood and keep open cuts, sores, bites etc covered and take care to not share person hygiene items that may have trace amounts of blood on them such as razors, toothbrushes, nail clippers. etc. Please take care with your liver health and always avoid alcohol and eat a healthy diet. If you continue to test HBsAg positive after 6 months then you want to consult with a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and liver health.

  46. i tested HEP B ag +, and i sleep with my wife n our 2months old baby ..wont i spread the virus to them?

    1. Since your are HBeag positive, you are likely more infectious to others. Please be sure your wife and baby are tested to be sure they are not hepatitis B positive. If either of them does NOT test positive for HBV, then they should be immediately started with the 3 shot HBV vaccine series according to schedule. If one or both are positive, then please email at info@hepb.org

  47. Hello Sir,

    Recently, I got jaundice and one of my test shows HBsAg Reactive. I must have it 5 months back.
    I only have a month left in acute phase, I would like to know what can I do to built immunity against HBV.
    Thank you

    1. Hopefully you have been under a doctor’s care with your jaundice, just to be sure your bilirubin is within safe ranges. 90% or more of healthy adults will clear an acute (new) infection. There is no way to guarantee you will clear the infection, but you do want to take care during this time with your liver health. Be sure to avoid all alcohol, drink plenty of water and eat healthy meals. A little exercise is good too. Please be sure to follow up with a hepatitis B panel after 6 months to be sure you have cleared your HBV infection. If you have not, you will want to consult with a liver specialist to learn more.

      1. Hello Sir,
        Thank you for your reply, I was devastated few days ago but now I controlled my emotions and trying to be more positive and relaxed.
        My Jaundice is better, total bilirubin got down from 7.8 to 2.0. I consulted with a Gastro doctor and he gave me Lamivudine tablets for now.
        As I am pretty sure that I must have got this virus in mid December, from when should I count my 6 month.

        1. Hopefully this is an acute infection and you will soon clear it. I’m glad to hear the jaundice and more severe symptoms have subsided. Be sure to retest to be sure everything is okay and that you have cleared the virus. Continue taking good care of your liver!

  48. , 2014 at 2:04 pm | Reply

    Your comment is awaiting moderation. 

    Hepatitis b – virus s – antigen (cliA) neg 0.030 lu/ml hepatitis b -virus s-antilichaam (cliA) pos 100 lu/L hepatitis b virus core Al( cliA) pos hepatitis b virus e-antigeen (cliA) neg 0. 0100 lu/ml hepatitis b e- antilichaam( clia) pos hepatitis A virus total Al (clia) pos hepatitis c virus Al (clia ) neg. Please I need answer please sir help me to understand very  well

    1. I am confused with the way you have posted your results. it’s difficult to tell what is positive or negative. It looks like you had a hepatitis panel run and were tested for hepatitis A, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. I THINK you are HBV negative, but had a previous infection and that you currently have a hepatitis A infection. Please confirm with your doctor. If you have an HAV infection, you are likely highly infectious to others. Please confirm your result with your doctor.

  49. Hepatitis b virus s – antigen (CLIA) neg hepatitis b virus s-antibody (cliA ) pos hepatitis b virus core Already (clia) pos hepatitis b virus e antigen (clia) neg hepatitis b virus e-antibody (clia) pos hepatitis A virus total al (cliA) pos hepatitis c virus Already (clia ) neg

  50. Liver specialist said i don’t have it anymore i can give it my boyfriend or if i gave birth today my child we not have i am free from it i have it in the pass my liver is ok

    1. According to the results you sent, I still believe you had a past hepatitis B infection and that you are currently infected with hepatitis A. If you have newer results and your doctor says you have do not have a hepatitis A infection than certainly listen to his advice. If you are still infected with hepatitis A then you need to take care with your boyfriend. You will need to talk to your doctor to know if a hepatitis A infection will be a problem during your pregnancy. I do not know.
      PLEASE be sure your baby gets a birth dose of the HBV vaccine within 12-24 hours of birth. This is very important. Be sure baby completes the HBV vaccine series according to schedule. There are 3 shots in the series. Baby needs to have one shot before leaving the hospital and the other shots at baby follow up visits according to schedule

  51. Hep
    Liver specialist said i don’t have it anymore i can give it my boyfriend or if i gave birth today my child we not have i am free from it i have it in the pass my liver is ok

    titis b virus s – antigen (CLIA) neg 0.030 IU/mL hepatitis b virus s-antibody (CLIA ) pos 1000 IU/L hepatitis b virus core Already (CLIA) pos hepatitis b virus e antigen (CLIA) neg 0.0100 IU/mL hepatitis b virus e-antibody (CLIA) pos hepatitis A virus total al (CLIA) pos hepatitis c virus Already (CLIA) neg

    loveth | May 28, 2014 at 2:34 pm | Reply

    Liver specialist said i don’t have it anymore i can give it my boyfriend or if i gave birth today my child we not have i am free from it i have it in 

    1. Good to know you are seeing a liver specialist. If you no longer have HBV then you cannot pass it to your boyfriend or your baby. I don’t know about the status of your hepatitis A. Please be sure your baby gets a birth dose of the HBV vaccine within 12 to 24 hours of birth. Baby must also complete the HBV vaccine series according to schedule. HBV is common in 3/4 of the world and babies and children are very vulnerable to HBV. Please be sure you talk to your doctor about your baby getting at birth dose of the HBV vaccine.

  52. Hepatitis b virus s – antigen (CLIA) neg 0.030 IU / mL hepatitis b virus s-antibody (CLIA) pos 1000 IU/L hepatitis b virus core Already (CLIA) pos hepatitis b virus e antigen (CLIA) neg 0.100 IU /mL hepatitis b virus e-antibody (CLIA) pos hepatitis A virus total al (CLIA) pos hepatitis c virus Already (CLIA ) neg

  53. Please sir What is the meaning of TND=Target not Detected=negative. But he said i Don have it again ,how can it detected from my blood i Don have any treatment for this hepatitis b the liver specialist said my liver is ok them check it everything is ok but in went away by in self but he told my my kids will not have it or my boyfriend please I need answer thanks

    1. If you do not have HBV then you will not infect others. However, as I have stated previously it is still important that your children be vaccinated to protect against hepatitis B. Babies are particularly vulnerable. The WHO recommends a birth dose of the HBV vaccine for all children. Talk to your doctor and be sure your babies receive a birth dose of the HBV vaccine and the remaining shots in the series according to schedule. When they ran your labs they ran quantitative labs so there are numerical values associated. If you want to scan your results you can send them to info@hepb.org, but from what I see you are not currently infected with HBV, but you did have a previous infection.90% of healthy adults that are infected with HBV will clear the virus on there own. However, 90% of babies that are infected with HBV will have HBV for life. That is why a birth dose of the HBV is so important.

    1. If you wish you can send the email to info@hepb.org I did not receive your mail. Please scan your results and send them if you want me to review them. However, if you are seeing a liver specialist, then I’m sure he well aware of your situation. Looks to me that your HBV infection is an old infection and you have resolved it, which would mean you are not infectious for hepatitis B

  54. Please sir i need your help can you explain to me Hepatitis b – virus s – antigen ( CLIA ) negative 0.030lu/ml hepatitis b virus s – antibody (CLIA ) positive 1000 lu/L hepatitis b virus core Already ( CLIA ) positive hepatitis b virus e antigen (CLIA ) negative 0.0100 lu/ml hepatitis b e – antibody (CLIA ) positive hepatitis A virus total (CLIA ) positive hepatitis c virus Already ( CLIA ) negative TND = Target not Detected = negative

    1. Does this relate to Loveth in posts and emails? It looks like you had a previous HBV infection that you resolved since you are HBsAg negative, HBsAb positive and HBcAb positive, (and HBeAg neg, HBeAb pos). You will need to email to info@hepb.org if you have additional questions.

  55. Thanks sir I really appreciate your time for me is good to no I don’t have it anymore what about the hepatitis A – virus total alpositive but my doctor said that is not a problem I may be I have it in the pass .

  56. hello sir.i m from nepal..some days ago( 3 weeks) I was admitted in hospital for the cause of jaundice. later my ultrasound report concluded that I had acute hepatitisB. after sme days my hbsag tesr was done which was found reactive of 4.157.then hbv viral dna test was done which was found negative and also the hbeag test was negative..I was discharged after one week..today again u was tested for hbsag ..and was reactive..what should I do..I m really feeling so dipressive..plz hlp me..plz.

    1. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. Do you know if they ran an anti-Hbc IgM test? Typically when this test is positive it indicates an acute infection, but sometimes it can be the result of a flare in someone with a chronic infection. I would recommend taking care of your liver and general health at this time and have your doctor run a hepatitis B panel 4-6 months following the first positive HBsAg test. 90% of healthy adults that are newly (acutely) infected with HBV will clear the infection on their own, but you will need to confirm this is an acute infection and that may take some time. While you wait, do NOT drink alcohol, avoid smoking and do your best to eat a healthy diet filled with vegetables, fruits, whole grains and limited lean meats. Be sure to avoid transmission to others by avoiding direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Please try not to panic. For now you want to take good care of yourself and re-run your lab work to see if you have cleared your HBV infection. It should clear within 6 months if it is an acute infection. If you learn this is a chronic infection you will want to see a liver specialist to learn more. For now try not to panic. One step at a time.

  57. I had not any physical relation nor I used any injections etc..I dont knw how m I infected with this virus.i m just 22 yrs girl..cant stop myself from crying and thinking about my future..what to do sir..plz help me plz plz.

    1. HBV is transmitted through direct contact with blood and body fluids. HBV can live outside the body for a week, so even if you come into contact with trace amounts of blood or infected fluids you can get HBV. It is not just a sexually transmitted disease. One of the most common ways HBV is transmitted from an HBV positive mother to her baby at birth. Babies and young children are very vulnerable to HBV infection. 50-90% of young children and babies that are infected with HBV will remain chronically infected where as 90% of healthy adults newly infected with HBV will likely clear their infection without the need for any medication. Because there may be no symptoms for decades many that are infected at an early age have no idea they have an infection. That is why you want to follow up to be sure you have an acute infection and that you have cleared the infection. HBV is very common in Nepal.

  58. hello sir. I m 22 yrs girl .I was admitted in hospital some days ago(3 weeks)..for the cause of jaundice.later my ultra was done and found to be infected with acute hepatitisB. .my hbsagtest was done and found reactive with 4.157..again hbv viral dna and hbeag was taken and both were found non reactive. .after 1 week I was discharged ..and again yesterday I was tested for hbsag and found reactive. .I dont knw what to do..I had not any physical relation nor I used any injections etc. .dnt knw how m I infected with this..I cant stop myself from crying. .feeling so dippressed..thinking of my future..plz help me sir..I dpnt want to get chronic to this..plz help me..plz plz

    1. Please note that I do my best to respond to all correspondence on this blog, through social media outlets and via email in a timely manner. I recommend that you take a deep breath and try not to panic. Many people very innocently get disease from HBV+ mothers and others. Having an acute or chronic HBV infection does not mean you acquired it sexually or through other illicit ways. Follow the advice of your doctor and be sure you are monitored according to his recommendations to be sure you are recovering well. Repeat your hepatitis B panel to be sure you clear your acute infection. A person is considered chronically infected if they remain HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. You can get tested earlier than 6 months, but know that the time it takes to clear an acute infection varies.

      1. Hello sir,i was diagnosed with hepatitis B last month,and the doctor advised me to take the following drug,lamivudine,essential forte,glucose,and after 28days taking treatment with the said drugs,i went for another test again i becomes negative.So in this case,what would be my future status,would it come back after series test?is there any after effect?in long ?Please share your experience with me as much as you can

        1. Hello: Without seeing your lab report, it is hard to comment. If you were recently infected with hepatitis B, you may have cleared the infection on your own. It takes several weeks or months for our bodies to clear the virus when we’re infected as adults. I don’t think the drugs would have cleared the virus in just one month. I would recommend you get tested again in a few months to make sure your body has cleared the infection. Once you develop hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb) you are considered immune from future infection and will not be able to spread the virus to anyone else. Good luck.

  59. yes sir I knw..today when I met the doctor. he told that around 99% are cured by their own and not to take tension..and also asked for IgM anti-HBC test and HDV test..if I m found positive in these tests then what shall I think about this matter?
    looking for your response.

    1. if you are anti-HBc IgM positive then you are most likely acutely infected. (See previous answers) HDV is another hepatitis virus that coexists with HBV. Your doctor is just being thorough. I would take a deep breath and take all of this one step at a time. It’s all you can do right now since ultimately it takes time for the immune system to resolve the virus. Please be patient and take good care of your liver health while you wait.

  60. thanku sir..my test will be done after some days..then what the result comes..I would definitely share with u..I m feeling good now..dont feel any wakness..hope I m getting immuned to the virus..eat healthy food that include cucumber,fresh vegetables,fruits…hope I will get well soon.. thanku.

  61. sir
    my wife has been vaccinated for hepatitis b in three doses and their dates are 29/4/14, 29/5/14, and 1/6/2014 after the third dose when shall i go for booster dose and when shall i make sex with her with out condom. sir at the same time what are the regular tests to be done if hepatitis B occurs plz reply to me sir

    1. Perhaps your wife should have her anti-HBs titers tested to confirm she has developed immunity to hepatitis B. One month following the last shot of the series have the doctor run an anti-HBs titer test. If it is 10 Iu/mL or greater than she has generated adequate immunity and is protected. Once you know this she is protected and you can have unprotected sex and do not need to worry.

      You need to consult with a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and liver health. He will run extensive blood work to learn more such as HBeAg/HBeAb, HBV DNA, ALT/AST and other liver function tests, PT test, complete health and family history, ultrasound of the abdomen. Following these baseline tests, regular monitoring should be done every 6 or 12 months. Initially your doctor may wish to monitor you more closely.

  62. sir
    you are telling the vaccination procedure as three shots i.e 0,1 and 6 months but my doctor suggested to take a continous shots i.e 0, 1 and 2. recently i followed the same and vaccinated like my doctor says is there any drawback if we take like that plz tell me
    shall we take another shot at 6months?
    what about the booster dosage plz reply sir

    1. A booster dose is just another dose of the vaccine – same dosage. I would advise another shot at 6 months unless you wish to have your titers checked to see if you generated adequate immunity. Getting an additional shot will not hurt you.

  63. Hi hepbtalk,

    Can you please interpret my latest laboratory results:

    HBsAg : positive
    HBsAb : positive 170/IU/L
    HBcAb : positive
    HBcIgM : negative
    HBeAg : negative
    HBeAB : positive
    HBV DNA PCR (quantitation) : Log Units <1.3

    Been in entecavir/baraclude since 2008 up to now. Bit confused of my HBsAg and HBsAb coz they are both positive. Based on my results, is their any possibility that the HBsAg will turn into negative? Hoping to hear from you soon.

    1. I would repeat testing in another few months to see how your results look. It is a bit odd to see both HBsAg and HBsAb positive. It would be wonderful if you are in the process of seroconversion and you will only know through repeat testing. The other possibility could be a surface antigen mutation. Keeping my fingers crossed for you that you are in the process of seroconversion!

  64. sir
    my husband got hepatitis b and his test results are normal and dna is also not detectable range. i got vaccination as three shots my doctor done it continously i.e 0, 1month, 2 months but while reading your article you are suggesting 0, 1 and 6 months. is there any drawback if i go continously and shall i take one more shot at 6 months. if i take it there will be any over dosage and ill health problem please suggest me iam fully confused. in some of the websites i read about booster dosage when shall we go for booster dosage kindly reply iam very thank full for you

    1. 0, 1 and 6 is the recommended schedule to generate adequate immunity. I would confirm immunity 1 month following the last shot of the series to confirm immunity. There is no drawback to having the additional shot at 6 months. There is no danger to your health.

  65. hepbtalk:
    Thank you very much for your quick response. I’m so glad that I’m in the process of seroconversion. And I just want to know what is the meaning of surface antigen mutation? Thank you.

  66. My friend has HBsAG screening negative and HBsAG Elisa positive with ABS of 3.239. What does it mean? Thank you!

    1. Sounds like your friend first tested negative, but later tested positive for HBsAg. Can’t say anything about the validity of the tests, but would suggest that he speak to his doctor. If this is a new infection, then he may not have tested positive initially because he was within the 4-6 week window when a newly infected person may not test positive. However it looks like he is positive now, but needs to confirm with a doctor. Assuming he currently has an HBV infection, then he needs to learn if his infection is acute (new) or chronic. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for longer than 6 months. While he waits, tell him to take precautions avoiding direct contact of blood and body fluids. HBV is also a sexually transmitted disease so practice safe sex, keeps open sores and cuts covered and do not share personal items such as razors, toothbrushes or anything that might have blood on it. Sexual partners and close household contacts and family members should be screened for HBV and if they are not positive or have a resolved HBV infection then they should be vaccinated. Be sure he takes care of his health – NO alcohol, avoid smoking and eat a healthy diet and get regular exercise. Most importantly talk to the doctor about his infection.

  67. Hello sir/ma’am i did a test tody and my HBsAg reactive…

    I’m so stressed please help me wht to do next…thank you very much …

    1. First you want to determine if you have an acute or chronic infection, so it looks like you are reading the correct blog. You can ask your doctor for an anti-HBc IgM test which may indicate acute or chronic, though not always definitive, but if you test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then it is a chronic infection. Take care to prevent transmission at this time. Be sure sexual partners and close, household contacts are screened and if they are negative for HBV then they should be vaccinated to protect them. Be sure to practice safe sex with any partner that has not been vaccinated. Please do NOT drink during this time and try to eat healthy. Most importantly repeat a visit to your doctor for testing. If you learn you have a chronic infection then you should see a liver specialist to learn more.

  68. sir
    recently i tested my anti hbs titers 1 month after the last shot and the value is 28.0 shall we made sex without condom

    1. You are protected since your anti-HBs titer is above 10 Iu/mL. You are safe to have unprotected sex to protect against HBV. Just keep in mind that safe sex also protects from STDs so take care with partners.

  69. sir
    iam having hepatitis b and my wife is vaccinated in three doses and we done the anti hbs titer for her and the value is 28.o at present she is pregnant is there any chances of getting hepatitis B to my wife and child kindly reply sir

    1. Congratulations to you and your wife! Your wife has an anti-Hbs titer that is greater than 10 so she is protected and will not get HBV, nor can she give it to your baby. However, I would follow WHO recommendations and be sure baby receives a birth dose of the HBV vaccine within 24 hours of birth followed by the remaining shots in the series to be sure that your baby is protected from the start and never has to worry about getting HBV. Best of luck to you!

  70. Hi…i recently tested positive for hep b…i got tested a few months before and it was negative. Does this mean i just got it or could it jave gone undected? I am an alcoholic so i am trying to get that under control cause i am hoping i have acute and not chronic..very scared right now..any info would be greatly appreciated.

    1. Sounds like it is an acute/new infection. You will want to take care with your liver health and take care not to transmit to others until you learn more. Consider asking your doctor to run an anti-HBc IgM test, where a positive result typically indicates an acute infection. It is not always definitive, but usually pretty good. Ultimately if you test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months, then you are considered chronically infected. If you learn this is the case then you will want to see a liver specialist to learn more about chronic HBV and your liver health. Please take care to avoid all alcohol, preferably smoking and try to eat a healthy diet and drink plenty of water. Please be sure to repeat testing to confirm your test results. Typically the tests themselves are not error prone, though false positives certainly happen. Often the problem is an inaccurate interpretation of the results. Ask for a copy of your test results and compare with blood test results here: http://www.hepb.org/patients/understanding_the_results.htm

  71. Hi,I went for a malaria trial ,that was the safety test of a new drug,as alwaways I had a seroologic test with a result as folow HbsAg positive,HbsAb negative,LFT 42ALT,no symptoms,I am 35 years old married,IgG HaAb positive IgM HaAb negative the doctor ask me to return 30 dayss later.to compare the results but he eventualy took blood to check for my load viral and prescribe me with Vitamine bcomplex and Vitamine c (ascorbic acide) 30 tablets each,one per day eachl. Can someone tell me please what does this mean?is it my ALT so high or can this vitamin influence something on my results?

    1. It is not unusual for someone to learn of their HBV infection when the donate blood or have general screening and learn about their HBV. It is also not unusual to have chronic HBV and have few or no notable symptoms. Symptoms may not occur for decades. Your anti-HBc IgG pos and anti-HBc IgM neg certainly indicates you have a chronic infection. If you remain HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then you are considered chronically infected. You were most likely prescribed vitamin B and C because your doctor tested and saw that you have a vitamin deficiency? I would certainly ask. It shouldn’t impact your ALT at all, but perhaps you will feel a bit better with the correct levels of vitamins.

  72. HBsAg is Positive and HBsAB is Negative and HBcb is Negative but I just recently found that not so sure if its acute or chronic do you think I still have a chance that this will clear off or stays with me for life?

    1. There is no way for me to know. If you are quite sure it is a new infection,then you will likely clear it. 90% of healthy adults that get a new HBV infection will clean it. However, many have no idea if it is a new infection or an old infection because there are typically few or no obvious symptoms for decades. You need to re-test to be sure. If you continue to test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then it would be considered a chronic infection. While you wait, be sure that close, household contacts and sexual partners are screened for HBV and if they do not already have HBV or if they have not resolved a previous infection, then they should be vaccinated to protect them against HBV. Take precautions to not transmit to others and avoid direct contact with blood and body fluids. HBV is also a sexually transmitted disease. Please take care of your liver health. Do NOT drink alcohol, avoid smoking and eat a healthy well balanced diet. If you learn you have a chronic infection then be sure to meet with a liver specialist to learn more.

  73. I am 34 years old and was suffering from cold and cough as one of the symptom on 1st September, immediately on 22nd September I was diagnosed with Hepatitis B acute with jaundice/yellow urine with no any other symptoms. I was admitted in hospital as my Billirubin count raised to 16 and also SGPT was 3000 count plus. I got my LFT test yesterday and INR too. My Bilirubin is 2, SGPT 25 and INR 1.1.

    I have managed to bring my all enzyme levels and inflammation normal as before. do you think I am no more in danger and when I say that, does it mean I will recover from acute hepatitis B much before 6 month as a normal threshold and also do you think I should be negative in few weeks? Please let me know if I can start gyming and weight lifting after weeks?any specific diet that I should follow while gyming. I am a athlete and lost few weight due to boiled food intake since last 2 month.

    can I take protein powders?

    1. Sounds like you may be recovering from an acute infection, BUT you need to confirm this because you could also be experiencing an acute exacerbation of a chronic HBV infection. Not knowing anything about your health and family history or any of your earlier lab results, I cannot say. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for longer than 6 months. Please be sure your doctor runs a hepatitis B panel to determine the status of your HBV at 6 months. Please take it easy until you have confirmed whether or not you have cleared your infection. You can certainly test earlier, and hopefully all will be well. I would encourage you to wait to resume added protein powder to your diet. If you are feeling well you can certainly resume exercising, but talk to your doctor about how much you should or should not be exerting yourself and your diet. Your ALT/SGPT and bilirubin levels were dangerously high. You want to be sure to get a clean bill of health from your doctor before returning to full-out training.

  74. i’m deteced with Hbsag pos recently,hbeag neg, but on october last year, i have a test of hbsag neg. it’s mean that i will clean this virus within six month??? can i need any special treatment???

    1. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. Be sure to repeat testing to confirm whether or not you currently have an acute infection and you have cleared the infection, or if you have a chronic infection. 90% of healthy adults that are newly infected with HBV will clear the virus on their own without medication, but you need to confirm with testing. Sometimes people are not aware that they had a chronic infection. While you wait take care of your liver. Do NOT drink alcohol and avoid smoking and environmental toxins. Be sure to eat a well balanced diet and get regular, moderate exercise. Take care to not transmit HBV to others. Keep open cuts, sores, etc covered,practice safe sex and avoid sharing personal items that may have trace amounts of blood on them such as razors, toothbrushes, nail clippers, body jewelry etc since HBV is transmitted with direct contact with blood and infected body fluids.

  75. Good day to you.

    Recently I was hospitalized for a month and just discharged today. I initially had fatigue that had an extreme onset, resulting in joint pain, then a week of fevers from 37.5 to 39 degrees celsius. These symptoms stopped and then slowly I began having yellowing of my skin and eyes. All of this occured during my hospital stay.

    Doctors have noticed my liver enzymes ALT/AST and bilirubin skyrocket from normal values to 1980/1200/250 respectively. Then noticed it slowly falling down to 170/68/70 respectively on which they have asked for a liver ultrasound which showed normal and they decided I should be discharged.

    They ran alot of virology related testing, which ranged from CMV to HIV and including all hepatitis. I was unfortunately tested positive for HBV. I believe that I have contracted this virus from a previous partner or from the barber shop who gives my head a clean shave and have bruised my several times (6 times in past 3 months).

    Here is the virology tests done to me with HBV panel:

    1- HBsAg – Positive +ve
    2- HBeAG – Negative -ve
    3- HBeAB – Positive +ve
    4- CoreIGM – Positive +ve
    5- HBcAB – Positive +ve

    Viral load at 1,233,446 IU/ml

    ==================================================

    My questions are the following:

    1- Being 27 year old healthy male, am I part of the 10% who didn’t clear the virus?

    2- About 1% of all HBV acute cases develop a quick onset of liver failure (ALF) my doctors kept monitoring my INR to see the blood clotting, which went from 1.6 (during the heavy onset of symptoms) to 0.98, same thing with PT and APPT all dropped down to normal values. I keep informing the liver specialists that they need to check the toxins in my blood because I can go into a hepatic coma at any time to which they kept ignoring me. Why is it impossible to diagnose an acute liver failure? 80% of ALF cases are from HBV infections and they give me a blind eye?

    3- I have contacted transplant centers worldwide and told them to get ready for my admissions as I have several donors that will accompany me once complications of a hepatic coma occurs, usually HBV infections which shows jaundice are alarming point for ALF correct? why did a panel of 4 liver specialists and 5 gastro doctors wanted me discharged if I had heavy liver damage (enzymes proof) and jaundice etc..? can I sue them if HE comma becomes grade 2 or 3?

    4- Finally not a single doctor knows if what I have is acute or chronic, they want to believe its acute but they hate to believe that I just got a flare up from HBV, what do you think?

    Thank you for your time, please understand that I suffer from anxiety disorders which became worse after this infection.

    1. I am sorry to hear of your HBV diagnosis and the serious symptoms you experienced, and that this has added to your anxiety. It is certainly possible that you contracted a new, acute HBV infection from a sexual partner with HBV or through an unsterilized razor at the barbershop or other direct contact with infected blood. There is the anti-HBc IgM test, but unfortunately it is not definitive and cannot reliably be used to distinguish between an acute infection and an acute exacerbation of a chronic infection. Sometimes you have a situation where your possible exposure times well with your symptoms, but other times it may not be obvious, so you cannot definitively link back and say it is an acute infection. Sometimes there will be obvious clinical evidence of a long term infection, but often that is not the case. Since there are often no symptoms with a chronic infection, it is possible for someone to have a chronic infection and be completely unaware of it for decades. Often it is learned after donating blood or a tested for during a routine physical if ALTs are elevated and other risk factors are present. Sometimes people experience acute exacerbations. That being said, the ultimate test is to repeat testing, and if a person remains HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months, then they are considered chronically infected. Sadly it is not uncommon for someone to unexpectedly learn that they have a chronic infection even though they believe they have not been infected. It can certainly be a difficult time waiting up to 6 months to learn whether or not you had and resolved an acute infection like the 90% or greater of those healthy adults newly infected. There are those 5-10% that are newly infected that do not resolve an acute infection for whatever reason. However, it could also be that a person has a chronic infection that they likely acquired years ago, and that they were unaware of their infection.

      Looking at your results, they were very elevated, though it does sound like you were carefully monitored by your physicians. Fortunately your ALT/AST and bilirubin levels appear to be steadily declining, and your PT levels are now normal, which is why they felt comfortable discharging you. Had they remained at that level or continued to elevate, then I am sure they would have taken a different course.

      I know this has been a frightening experience for you, but I encourage you to take it one step at a time. I understand the waiting can be very difficult. I can only suggest that you try to focus on getting back to a regular routine and consider healthy lifestyle choices you can adopt that will benefit your liver, particularly while your liver is recovering. And of course follow up with continued monitoring and followup testing. Hopefully this is an acute infection that you will resolve, but if not, you will find a liver specialist that will carefully evaluate your condition and determine if you would benefit from treatment since there are very good treatments out there to control and manage the virus. Certainly no one wants to have any chronic condition, but please know that many, many people with chronic HBV are living long, very full lives. For now, focus on getting well and employ whatever practices you use to try to calm your anxiety.

  76. Also you keep saying 90% will clear the virus, so does many other websites. I paid for a subscription to access medical articles for a month and did a full research, in the end I found that an overall average across 8 countries to which these studies originated from (3 studies in China, 2 in Egypt, 1 in Scotland, 1 in Brazil, 1 in Japan, 1 in Saudi Arabia, 1 in South Korea and finally 1 in India) gave me an average of 93.8%. Some studies like one in china involving 1942 patients had a clearing rate of HBsAg of 95.2%.

    Also why isnt there any information on the rest 5-10% who doesnt clear the virus, who are they? are they too old? too young? immunocomprimised? have organ failure? there is not a single source of information that tells you why these poor folks couldn’t clear it? Please help me I am obsessed with this HBV its taking over my mind

    1. If there was a way to definitively state why a person does or does not clear an acute HBV infection then we would all certainly know of it. The virus and the immune system response is extremely complicated – well beyond the scope of this blog and administrator. I’m sure many scientists and doctors have their theories, but until they are proven, they are just theories. My suggestion is to turn your focus to taking the best care possible of your liver and general health. Please, try to take all of this one step at a time.

  77. i admit hospital recently bcoz of jaundice bt the doc said my blood test rslt detected for acute hep b.now im confuse about diet tht wat to eat n wat to not.pls help me thanku.

    1. You want to be sure to NOT drink any alcohol. Avoid smoking and environmental toxins. Eat healthy foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains and limited lean meats. Be sure to avoid fast food, and processed foods. Generally eat a healthy diet and get up and about for some moderate exercise – walking etc.

  78. i was detected for acute hep b last mont whn i ws admit for jaundice in hospital.my lft test was come to norml after 3 Week but hbsag+pos, hbeag+3.95reactive, hbv dna Viral load=22300iu/ml. But im confuse about acute n chronic hep b.tht Wt test should be exactly done to confirm acute. Becoz doc did not prscribe me any medicine he jst told me to retest after six month.

    1. Your doctor is correct. There isn’t truly a definitive way to determine if you have an acute infection or an acute exacerbation of a chronic infection (flare) – even with an anti-HBc IgM test. Ultimately if you continue to test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then it is considered a chronic infection. If it is an acute infection, most (90% or greater) will clear the infection on their own without the need for medication. If it is a chronic infection then you will need to see a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and liver health. Be sure to avoid transmission to others and take good care of your liver health while you wait.

    1. You can ask your doctor to run an anti-HBc IgM test. If this is positive then it indicates that you have an acute infection. However, it can also indicate that you are having an acute exacerbation of a chronic infection. There is no true definitive test, though your doctor may have a better idea looking at all of your test results, and knowing your situation. If you test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then you are considered chronically infected. If it is an acute infection, 90% and more will clear the infection without the need for medication. If you learn you have a chronic infection you will want to see a liver specialist to learn more. Be sure to take care to avoid transmission to others and take care of your liver’s health by avoid alcohol etc. and eating properly.

  79. Sry frst 1is some mistake. Anti hbs= 26.3 [high or=10.0(reactive)]
    Is the test result positive or negative. Im confuse pls help me thnku.

    1. I”m not exactly sure of your question. Your test result indicates you have adequate immunity to hepatitis B based on your anti-HBs titer of 26.3. Anything about 10 is considered adequate immunity. If you were concerned whether or not you have hepatitis B, then you would have been looking at the antigen or HBsAg.

  80. My blood test rslt came anti hbs=26.3 Iu/ml
    [High or=10.0(reactive)]
    and anti hbe=0.190 iu/ml
    [low >1.0 Non reactive
    <or=1.0 Reactive.]
    bt im confuse tht wht does my blood test result indicate is the anti hbs and anti hbe=positive or negative pls rply me thanku.

  81. Good Day, I noticed you really make out time to reply to each person’s post. That is really Awesome. May your selfless efforts get you rewarded plenty plenty…

    I did LFT tests and got the following:
    HBsAg -ve;
    Hepatisis C -ve;
    ALT /SGPT 8 I.U/L (0-12) I.UL;
    AST = SGOT 9 I.U/L (0-12) I.UL
    Alkaline Phosphate – 37 I.U/L (30 -45) I.U/L
    Total Bilirubin – 23 umoI/L (0-17.1) umoI/L
    Direct bilirubin – 12 umoI/L (0-10) umoI/L
    Indirect bilirubin – 10 umoI/L (0-10) umoI/L

    Before I went for the test, I was having constant stomach upset that seemed that ulcer or appendix (My doctor ruled out the later after physical examination) but laced me on ucler medication). I still continued to have those aches accompanied with huge weakness, prompt to vomit (but I never vomited for once).
    Then a stomach scan was recommended which I did. All organs came out positive but the liver was was inflamed. The lab comment was (Acute Fatty Liver? Acute/Chronic Hepatisis??. Suggest LFTs, Serum Liver Biochemistry/serology for viral markers)

    Based on the above, I did the Liver Function test with above result.

    Basically, I’ve seen your comment on high biliburin earlier. But I want to confirm – Is there any drug that can help reduce the bilirubin levels? Or could only healthy living reduce it?
    What could have caused it? Because I’m never a healthy alcohol drinker. I do take a bottle one in a month or thereabout..
    I read somewhere that Amoxicilin could have adverse effect on liver. Could it be the cause of high bilirubin – I ask because almost get treated evry month of Typhoid and the drugs I’m all given has Amoxicilin.
    How long could one wait to test the bilirubin levels again to see if its reducing or not?
    Any other advice is welcome.
    God Bless U

    1. Thank you for your kind words. You have a complicated situation and best addressed by possibly both a hepatologist (studies the liver) and a infectious disease doctor. I’m not quite sure about any correlation between your elevated bilirubin and ALT levels and regularly taking amoxicillin, though it appears as though there could be a correlation. Looks like typhoid can also result in changes in blood work including ALT and bilirbuin. I’m not sure why you have inflammation of the liver (noted elevated ALT), but it does not seem to be the result of viral hepatitis. And usually they can see fatty liver infiltration if it is fatty liver disease and elevated ALT, so I don’t think it’s that. I’m afraid I don’t have a good answer for you. Ultimately the goal is to address the problem that is causing your elevated bilirubin levels in particular and your elevated ALT levels. First you need to figure out that part. A consult with the hepatologist seems very important to me, but be sure to let him know about your recurrent typhoid and treatment. Elevated bilirubin levels could be the result of other liver problems which is why a good liver consult seems particularly important. Wish you the best.

  82. I was infected with hepaptitie b i don’t know about it but them told me i don’t have it anymore i have my immune system now I don’t have the virus anymore so i dont need treatment please sir What do want me to do my liver is ok

    1. I’m not completely sure of your situation, but it sounds like you had an acute infection that you resolved. If that is the case, your hepatitis B panel results will most likely look like the following: HBsAg negative, HBcAb positive and HBsAb positive. Confirm by looking at your results. 90% and more healthy adults that are newly infected with HBV will clear the virus on their own and generate immunity. It’s always good to take care of your liver health, but you shouldn’t need to do anything specific. However, should you ever require future long term immune suppression (for example some treatments for rheumatoid arthritis) or treatment for cancer, you would want to be sure to tell your doctor that you had a previous hepatitis B infection.

  83. First of I’ll like to appreciate for the help you are doing, I just recently diagnosed with chronic Hepb & i had the plan to meet my family in east Africa. & get married there unfortunately the dream just stopped here but I still want to meet my family coz it has been more than 10 years since I have met them so right now i am on green card status do you think it’ll affect my way back to US since. Hepb is a communicable disease ? Secondly how should i tell to the girl that i wants to marry her that I am Hepb postive? Appreciate your help.

    1. Sorry to hear of your recent chronic HBV diagnosis. Your HBV diagnosis should not cause a problem coming back into the U.S. Please don’t let your HBV keep you from living your life to the fullest. HBV is a vaccine preventable disease. The partner of your dreams can be vaccinated to protect against HBV, you can be sure to get regular care or treatment if necessary, have your career and live your life to the fullest. Tell your girl to start the 3 shot HBV vaccine series. It takes 6 months. By the time you arrive, she should be protected and you can marry and move forward.

  84. Hi On nov20 2014 iask some question about my acute hbv b and now all my blood test has come and the reports is here according to my result there is some question pls answer it. Im detected with acute hbv pos from last two month whn im hospitalised for jaundice. And now all my blood test report hs come
    hbeag(mthod cmia)=3.95 Reactive.

    hbeab(cmia)=0.190 Reactive.

    hbsab(cmia)= 26.3 miu/ml reactive.

    hbc igm(elisa)=0.7 Ratio non reactive.

    hbv dna viral load(cobas taqman)=22300 iu/ml.

    now im cnfuse about chronic n acute bcoz the discussion of hepa b in the internet was (hbc igm non Reactive) Means chronic hbv and according to this im chronic but why did my doc said that im in acute phase and come aftr 6 month for retest and he didnot prescribe me any medicine pls hlp me. Here is some question from me plz ans it.

    1)-is it true that hbc igm non reactive means he or she is100% chronic?

    2)-am i chronic or acute?

    3)-if im chronic thn why is my hbsab reactive?

    and symtom jaundice was diseappear 1 Month back. Now some time pain in my upper right abdoman. Pls help im so worried about acute or chronic rply me plz thanku. God blss u

    1. So the anti-HBc IgM being negative does indicate that you have a chronic infection. You can confirm this with repeat testing at 6 months. A person is considered chronically infected if they continue to test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. The jaundice could be the result of an acute HBV infection or an acute exacerbation of a chronic HBV infection. If you continue to have difficult symptoms like jaundice or others,then you should see your doctor. I know it’s difficult, but be patient and repeat testing and see what the next set of results bring. Be sure to discuss with your liver specialist.

  85. Hi
    I found that I have hepatitis b last month ago when I went to donate the blood,immediately I met a liver specialist and th ey have done hbsag positive and hbeag negative and hcv negative and lft is normal and doctor finally concluded that I am inactive carrier
    My age is 28 years
    My question is how many years can I live
    I want to know whether that it is acute or chronic
    I don’t have any symptoms
    If it.is chronic and my immune power is good can i remove the virus
    And my viral load copies is 1800 copies
    Pls help me getting tension

    1. You mention that your doctor says that you are an inactive carrier. I am assuming this indicates that you are chronically infected. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. You will want to confirm this with your doctor with repeat testing. A healthy adult that is newly infected with HBV (acute infection) will have a greater than 90% chance of clearing the virus. However it is possible you were infected at birth or a young age and that you are chronically infected. Many have no symptoms for decades and may find out like you did after donating blood or as a result of a physical. If you learn you are chronically infected it is not too likely that you would clear the infection, though there are a very lucky 2-3% per year that will spontaneously clear the virus.

      Although chronic HBV is a serious disease, many, many people with chronic HBV are living long, full lives with careers, friends, love and families. There is no way to predict how long you or anyone else will live. However you can do the best you can to live as long and healthy as possible by NOT drinking alcohol, by avoiding smoking and environmental toxins and maintaining a healthy weight through a well balanced diet and exercise. If you have a chronic infection then you will want to be sure you are carefully evaluated by a liver specialist and regularly monitored. Take the advice of the liver specialist. If you need treatment, then get treatment. You will likely find that you are not in need of treatment at this time. Your viral load is not too high, though i don’t know all of your details. Ask your doctor to explain your situation with you and to discuss your ALT/SGPT, liver function tests and whether or not you are HBeAg positive or negative. Continue with regular monitoring even if you do not benefit from treatment at this time in case there are changes to your HBV or the health of your liver.

    1. The partner that is not HBsAg positive should be tested for HBV and if they do not have a current or previously resolved HBV infection then they should be vaccinated to protect them against HBV. Practice safe sex until you know the status.

  86. Hi thanks for the respond, yesterday had an appointment with my liver specialist coz she e-mailed my viral load is sky Rocking & my Alt elevated to 55. I went to her office after a warm greeting she gave me two options either a three month blood test or Biopsy after she instructed me about the biopsy I was lit bit scared & preferred the three month blood check & I didn’t see any complains from the doctor so will this be a good decsion to my liver status? Appreciate again.

    1. Your viral load may be sky high, though your ALT is not too elevated, though elevated. If you have a high viral load you are most likely HBeAg positive. It is possible you are going through the clearance phase. Waiting 3 months should be fine. Your doctor certainly sounds reasonable, but you will want to consider her recommendation for a biopsy if your labs change with higher ALT etc. Take a deep breath.

  87. Hi,thanks for your advice so far.have been diagnosed of hbv since 2009.now my doctor said my viral load is really low just som traces left.how true is this?does it mean I can be hbv neg anytime soon?
    He also advised I get married as soon as possible,am 23 and already done with college.do you think he’s right about me gettin married asap?

    1. It sounds like you are in the less active phase of the virus – HBeAg negative, low or undetectable viral load, normal ALT. Many remain in this inactive phase for decades, forever, while some develop a mutation and the virus once again begins to replicate. That is why regular monitoring is so important. Despite being in this great place right now it is unlikely you will spontaneously seroconvert and lost HBsAg and gain the antibody. Only a lucky 2-3% do this.

      I think you should get married when you are ready. HBV is very effectively transmitted from an HBV+ mother to her baby. I’m not sure if this is his concern?? There is very effective prophylaxis to prevent mother to child transmission. Baby gets a birth dose of the HBV vaccine and a shot of HBIG within 12-24 hours of birth. This is effective greater than 90% of the time. Talk to your doctor to see why he feels it necessary for you to marry ASAP. I can’t imagine an HBV related reason.

  88. hi. my hepatitis markers last month were as follows: hbsag: non-reactive, Anti-hav igm: reactive, anti hcv: non-reactive. my doc gave me godex, ursofalk and hepamerz but after a month my AST and ALT levels still rose, i still have jaundice and relapsing symptoms like joint pains and fatigue. My doc ordered a complete hep b profile and changed some of the medications to ursofalk, legalon and prednisone. Im scared of the hepatitis b profile results. Is it possible that Im a carrier despite testing non-reactive to hbsag last month? Thank you. This is the most detailed and helpful website I’ve visited thus far. God bless and more power!

    1. A person with hepatitis B tests HBsAg positive. It looks like you might have a hepatitis A infection according to your positive anti-HAV IgM test. If you are HAV positive then you will resolve the infection as it does not become chronic. There is a window of time where you will not test positive for HBV, but it is only 6 weeks. After that you will be beyond the window and your test results will certainly reflect whether or not you have HBV. It doesn’t sound like it to me.

  89. hi! my hepatitis markers last month were as follows: hbsag- non-reactive, anti-hav igm – reactive, anti- hcv reactive. i only went to the doctor when the jaundice appeared. My ultrasound also revealed a gallstone. My doc prescribed me ursofalk, godex, hepamerz and audra for high triglycerydes. But my blood test after a month revealed my ast and alt rose higher. My doc has changed my meds now to ursolfalk, legalon and godex. He also requested for full hepa b profile and that is what im worried about. Is it possible that my hbsag will be reactive after a month. What would it mean if the other hepa b markers are positive? This is the most helpful blog I’ve visited so far. I’m from the Philippines by the way. Thank you in advannce. God bless and more power 🙂

    1. The gallstone is unrelated to whether or not you have HBV. Repeat the test and see how they look, but your previous test did not indicate HBV.

    1. Your ALT/AST is elevated, but without the blood work, it is impossible to know if it is HBV related. However, if you have hepatitis A, it would also elevate your ALT/AST. I would encourage you to discuss your results with your doctor.

  90. sorry my meds now are ursofalk, hepamerz, legalon and prednisone. They’re very expensive especially the hepamerz. I hope to recover soon. I’ve been prescribed bed rest for another whole month this holiday season 🙁

    1. Once again, best to see how your hepatitis B panel blood work looks and also discuss your HAV test results and why you are on bed rest though this holiday season.

  91. Dear Sir/Madam,
    I was diagnosed with Hepatitis B in Aug 2014 when I donated blood. Report shows HBsAg+Ve & HbeAg-tive.
    DNA Viral load 818 IU/ML (4744 copies). USG showed “Fatty Liver & coarse texture of Liver”.
    My Doc suggested me for liver biopsy and I did it and report showed “Fibrosis scoring – 0 and NAFLD Scoring – 6”
    LFT report shows
    Total Bilirubin (Serum) – 2.1 mg/dl (Ref. Range 03 to 1.2)
    Direct Bilirubin (Serum) – 0.59 mg/dl (Ref. Range upto 0.2)
    ALT (SGPT) (Serum) – 64 U/L (Ref. Range 5 to 40)
    All other like Albumin, GLOBULINS, AST, ALP are within normal range

    Doc told no need for a medicine for hepatitis and it will cure on its own and given me UDILIV 300mg & Evion 400mg tab for 2 months.
    Recent LFT (Just done yesterday) showed all normal. Doc told today to stop medicine and meet him after 3 months with LFT test done again. He told Hepatits screening test only after 1 year. I’m confused and he has not suggested any anti-HBc IgM test, HBcAb and HBsAb.

    Could you please suggest.

    It is frustrating me since I have not committed any mistakes and happily maried with kid. I tested for my wife and vaccinated her.
    For child as routine Hep vaccine has been given in 0,1 & 3 months. We have not told his doctor since I was not aware of my HepB during his birth. So I have following question for you.

    1. Is there any possibilities of child get HepB from father (my wife tested HBsAg -ve & my HBeAg was negative)
    2. Do i need to inform his doctor now? He is 5 months old now.
    3. I donated blood in previous vocations too and got the donar certificate. Do the blood bank give certificate even though we tested positive for HBsAg?
    4. Can I donate blood in future OR apply for foreign visa once cured from hepatitis?

    I hope you will clear my doubts.

    1. I believe you say you are HBeAg positive? I am not sure the way you transcribed your information. That makes a bit of a difference with your viral load and whether or not you would benefit from treatment, though either way guidelines would not recommend treatment with this viral load, but that could vary with the doctor – especially since you have fatty liver (NAFLD), elevated ALT, and evidence of liver disease. And if you are HBeAg negative, then you would be approaching when some liver specialists might treat (starting at 2,000 Iu/mL) This is something you want to discuss with your doctor, or even consider a 2nd opinion.

      I suspect since he sees evidence of liver disease that he assumes that you have chronic HBV. You could certainly ask him to run an anti-HBc IgM, which indicates an acute infection, though it is not always definitive. Ultimately if you test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months, then you are considered chronically infected. If you are unsure you should retest. Perhaps more importantly, assuming you are chronically infected, you might benefit from more regular monitoring which is every 6 months or more if the doctor is trying to determine your status. You might wish to look at this treatment guideline navigator comparing AASLD and EASL treatment and monitoring guidelines so you understand what I am referring to: http://www.chbnavigator.com You do not need to register for CME credit to review.

      Assuming you have chronic HBV, it is very likely you were infected as a baby or young child. Babies and children are very vulnerable to HBV. 90% of babies and up to 50% of young children infected with HBV will remain chronically infected. And there are many innocent ways to get HBV – direct contact with blood and body fluids, medical/dental error, tattoo/piercing, nail salon, barber shop, etc.

      Good to hear your wife has tested HBsAg negative. I would encourage your wife and child to get the 3 shot HBV vaccine series to protect them from getting HBV, which is prevalent in much of the world. Sounds like your son has completed the vaccine series. it is now 2 months since his last shot of the series? If so you might wish to have them check his anti-HBs titer and screen for HBV. I would discuss this with his doctor. It is much less likely he would get HBV from his father than from his mother with the obvious contact with infected blood and body fluid at birth.

      I’m not sure what to say about previous successful donation of blood. Is is possible they were not doing NAT screening? Perhaps it was missed, or perhaps I am incorrect assuming you are chronically infected. Once again, repeat testing 6 months from the first positive HBsAg test. Please do not donate blood in the future now that you have learned that you are HBsAg positive.

      Each country has their own policy regarding what they do and do not screen for. The Gulf Coast countries screen and deny work permits if the person is HBsAg positive. Other countries do not restrict access based on HBsAg status. I don’t think there is any restriction with a tourist visa.

      I encourage you to talk to your doctor. keep in mind that your fatty liver needs to be address with healthy lifestyle choice – do not drink alcohol and be sure to maintain a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise. Eat plenty of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and limited lean meats. Always avoid fast foods (KFC, McDonalds, etc) or any processed foods. Limit the amount of refined sugars found in sodas, and sweets. Try not to eat unhealthy fats (saturated). Don’t forget plenty of good, clean water.

      1. Thank you so much for your guidance.

        To confirm, my HBeAg is negative (sorry for the confusion in the way I described earlier). As for as my NAFLD is concerned, I go for a morning walk, do exercise and take plenty of vegetables from last 4 months. I completely avoided meat & chicken; take only fish once in 2 weeks (not fried) and I am also non-alcoholic. My elevated ALT level shows normal in recent LFT test.

        Certainly I will ask my doctor to run anti-HBc IgM for me and also run anti-HBs titer & screening for HBV for my son too as you suggested. I will go through the link given above for my understanding.

        Thank you again for your precious time taken to answer my query.

        Regards,
        Prasad

  92. Hi! I already sent my results to info@hepb.org. Hope you can help me interpret them. You have helped so many people around the world cope with this scary and very much mis-understood disease. I wish you all the BEST in your noble advocacy. God bless and more power!

  93. hi
    it has been 5 years that i find out that i have non active hep b but 3 days ago i have test it my LFT after that my doctor give me another test its about HBV DNA by QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE.
    my question is if some one who dosnt know ether hep b is active or non active dose he or she need to get the test of QUANTITATIVE OR QUALITATIVE?

    1. HBsAg reactive is the same as HBsAg positive and indicates that you currently have a hepatitis B infection. However, I cannot tell you if this infection is acute (new) or chronic with this limited information. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. You can ask your doctor to run an anti-HBc IgM test, though this is not always definitive, but can be helpful. Talk to your doctor and be sure to take precautions to prevent transmission to others and take care of your liver health while you wait to determine whether or not you have an acute or chronic infection.

  94. I took the 1st shot of hepatitis b vaccine 2 weeks ago. I had a cut in my mouth and kissed a carrier of the disease 2 weeks after the 1shot of the vaccine
    what are my chances of being infected

    1. There are a number of factors that come into play with transmission. The first shot of the vaccine provides up to 50% coverage. Depending on the depth of the kissing, the viral load of the person, and whether or not your mouth sore is open all enters into it. Remember that it is direct contact with blood or infected body fluids. A light kiss would not result in infection, but there is risk depending on other components. Keep in mind that there is a 4-6 week window where a person does not test positive for HBV even if they are infected. If you decide to test, know that you could get a false positive 1 month following vaccination, so don’t panic and consider the timing. Otherwise continue with the vaccine series according to schedule.

  95. If test results are:

    HBsAg is negative
    Hepatitis B Core IgM is negative

    Does that means never infected, or could it mean a past infection that has been resolved?

    1. Not necessarily. It means that you do not have a current HBV infection. The fact that you are anti-hcb IgM negative clarifies that further to tell you that you do not currently have an acute infection. if you wish to know about a previously resolved infection, ask to have an anti-hcb Total and anti-hsb test run. If you want to run an anti-hsb titer test, you will know if you have protection against HBV either through vaccination or resolving a previous infection.

  96. Hello. I’m wondering if a vaccinated person still can get hepatitis B as a result of his/her unprotected sex with hepatitis B Carrier… Hope to get answer from you soon.. Thank you.

    1. Unlikely, though there is the slight possibility that the vaccinated person was a non-responder to the vaccine. There is always the possibility with any vaccine that someone may not respond. Most likely you are all set. If you have serious concerns you can test 4-6 weeks following the possible exposure.

  97. Hello.How effective is the vaccine? If vaccinated, am I 100% free from Hepatitis B infection?. Hope to hear from you soon. Tqvm

    1. The HBV vaccine is a safe and effective vaccine. if you are concerned you can ask your doctor to run an anti-bbs titer test to be sure you generated immunity as a result of your vaccination. if your titers have waned, don’t be concerned. You can get a booster and repeat the titer test 1-2 months following the booster. Once you confirm you have generated immunity, then you are all set and are protected.

  98. Vaccinated on 2012, and marry on 2013. My husband was infected with hep.B by his mother at birth and we just know that. Is there any possibility that I am infected too as we had unprotected sex even though I had my vaccine?..

    1. Unlikely, but if you are concerned ask your doctor to run a hepatitis B panel. This will tell you if you have a current HBV infection, a previously resolved infection, and whether or not you have immunity whether it is from a previous infection or vaccination. Most likely you’re all set, but once again if you’re concerned, get tested.

  99. Hi,
    My wife is just diagnosed as a chronic hep b carrier, she was tested positive last year only, now her lft panel is in range, but viral load is 2300, is she an active or inactive carrier???

    1. I would encourage you to have your wife seen by a liver specialist to learn more about her situation. For example, you want to confirm whether or not she is HBeAg positive or negative, and look at her health health and family history along with other liver function tests. Her HBV DNA is not too high at this time, but there are other factors to consider.

    2. Your doctor wants to look at your wife’s HBeAg (positive or negative), her ALT (normal ALT for women is 19 IU/mL or less) and her viral load (IU/mL or cp/ml). When looked at together it gives a better profile. It sounds like she is likely in the inactive phase – best to confirm the things noted. Be sure she continues with regular monitoring of her HBV. She could also consider fibroscan if her HBV DNA and/or ALT rise. Be sure she also takes care with her health – no alcohol, and maintaining a healthy weight through diet and exercise.

  100. I was just told I have HBSag but I think there’s a mistake somewhere because ive been tested before and I didn’t have it. I also had the vaccination in 2003. I till don’t understand. Can someone explain to me?

    1. Consider repeat testing to confirm whether or not you have a current HBV infection. Perhaps it is a lab error, or there is the possibility that this is an acute infection. I know you have been immunized to protect against HBV, but there is a small percentage of the population that are non responders to the HBV vaccine. You want to test to confirm.

    2. I cannot say for sure. I would encourage you to have a hepatitis B panel run. This test returns 3 results (HBsAg, HBsAb, HBcAb) which when read together tell you if you have a current infection, a previously resolved infection and whether or not you have immunity to HBV due to either a past infection or vaccination. It’s possible this is a false positive. It’s possible you think you were tested before and you were not and you now have a current infection. You mention you were vaccinated, but if you had an HBV infection at the time you were vaccinated, then the vaccine would not benefit you. Are you sure you completed all 3 shots of the series? Some are not sure. if you did complete all 3 shots of the series then it is possible that you were one of the unlucky 5-10% that did not respond to the hepatitis B vaccine. Unless your anti-HBs titers were checked 1-2 months following your vaccine series, I cannot confirm one way or the other. These are just some ideas. I am sorry to hear of your infection. Please confirm you are HBsAg positive. If you are, be sure to follow up in 6 months to determine if this is a new, acute infection or a chronic infection. If you learn this is a chronic infection then be sure to see a liver specialist to learn more.

  101. Hello Sir,

    Last july 2014 i found that i have hbsag reactive, yesterday, jan 21 2015 result of LAB examination that i still have hbsag reactive and the doctor advice to have another lab examination the SGOT/SPGT.
    Here are my results
    SGOT/AST : 26.80
    normal value male :0-37 u/l
    SGPT/ALT : **49.18
    normal value male :0-41 u/l
    Can you tell me of my current findings?
    I have other questions
    1. I workout/exercise 4times/week and i eat high protein foods, like eggs.. Does high protein intake can worsen my condition?
    2. What foods should i be eating? How about white rice is it bad for my health?
    3. Does stress worsen my condition? Coz this last 2 months i can’t sleep well.. Maybe 4-6 hrs sleep/day only..
    4. Can green tea or any herbal tea like moringa bad for my health?

    Thank you in advance
    Thank you for helping us to understand hepitatis b. Thankyou sir

    1. As long as your liver is healthy (compensated and functioning well) then you can can certainly eat proteins, though I’m not sure if I would focus on a high protein diet, but rather a well balanced diet with more vegetables, fruits and whole grains. However protein from eggs is better than other animal sources. Brown rice would be preferable to white rice (higher fiber content). Be sure to avoid fast foods and processed meats and foods. Eat fresh and healthy. Stress is not good for your health in general. This is not something specific to HBV. Sleep is also important for your general health and will certainly benefit your liver health as well. Green tea or herbal teas are fine, unless they are touted truly as herbal remedies. Then you would want to look into them more closely. In general, all things in moderation are good. Please be sure you are regularly monitored by a liver specialist. You might like to learn if you are HBeAg positive or negative, and if possible perhaps your HBV DNA, viral load.

  102. Hi, I have been diagnosed with hep. B with (HbSAg pos., HbSAb pos., HbeAg net., HbeAb pos., HbcAb pos. Please is it chronic and if so is it going affect my urborn children?

    1. I’m not sure of the timing of your results or where you are in the course of the disease. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. You will want to retest to be sure one way or the other. If you learn this is a chronic infection then you will want to see a liver specialist to learn more.

  103. Hello Sir, I am confused by my IGM test results. I am writing it as I got the lab test report

    OnMay, 2014,
    anti-HBc, IGM: 0.85 U/ml (0.80 – 1.20 Gray Zone Reactive)

    On July 2014,
    Hbs Ag: Non-reactive
    Hep B CoreIGM ANTIBODY : 72.7 S/CO (>10 positive)

    On Oct 2014,
    Hbs Ag: Non-reactive
    Hep B Core Antibody (Anti-Hbc), Igm,serum (EIA): 3.70 index(>1.1 Positive)
    Anti-HBs: 64.5 mIU/mL (>=10 Reactive)

    On Feb 2015,
    HB CORE IgM: 142.00 (>=10 Positive)
    ANTI-HBS: 85 mIU/ml

    Considering that Anti-Hbs is positive and Hbs Ag is negative, I assume that virus is controlled by immune system but the results of IgM make me worry, according to whatever information I have this should be positive at the time of acute infection only but its been positive for more than 6 months now and it seems to increase only.

    I am unable to find this kind of result, I like to have your interpretation and your advice on this. I am feeling less energetic too, though the liver function test seems alright.

    1. There are 3 different types of core antibody tests (HBcAb) – there is HBcAb IgM, HBcAb IgG and HBcAb Total. They can mean different things when read in relation to other test results, and they mean different things depending on where you are in the course of the virus when you are tested. Sounds like you had an acute infection that you have resolved. Sometimes is takes a while for you to recover and be back to yourself. I don’t know the details of your infection – symptoms, no symptoms, etc.. It does vary from person to person though often people have no symptoms.If you continue to have problems you should talk to you liver specialist.

      1. Hello sir, Thank you for your prompt reply.

        I am bit confused about the tests, The last test that reads HB CORE IgM in the report means HBcAb IgM or not (since there is no Ab or anti written in report with it). ANTI-Hbs is positive for more than 4 months now so is there a possibility for HBcAb IgM to be positive for that long. I try to read about HepB from different sources but never saw the case where HBcAb IgM remain positive for so long.

        1. Core antigen is not measured in the blood, but only noted on biopsy, so your test should only reflect the core antibody (anti-HBc, HBcAb etc). Windows and time frames for various parts of the HBV lifecycle are guidelines and may vary with individuals over the course of the lifecycle (IgM, IgG, total HBc varying as it moves through the lifecycle) Personally I would run a hepatitis B panel and test for HBsAg, HBcAb (total) and HBsAb. I think you find that your test results indicate a previously resolved infection. If you remain concerned then I would run a viral load test or talk to a liver specialist about your specific situation

          1. So, I did another test for IGM and total core antibody.

            The results are
            Anti-Hbc, IGM: 1.95 index (>1.1 positive)
            Anti-Hbc Total: 10.13 index (>= 1 reactive)

            Though I cannot find such case (with HBsAg negative and Anti-HBS positive) in here http://www.hepmag.com/articles/2511_18747.shtml

            but, the graph in in link below shows a case somewhere close to mine. (Though I have more than 4 month window period)
            http://www.usmle-forums.com/usmle-step-1-bits-pieces/39155-acute-hepatitis-b-infection-window-period.html

            I like to know your thoughts, also is there anything I can do now or should wait for some more time and retest anti-HBC igm.

            Again I like to thank you for answering me and all of the people coming here. Thanks a lot for your time and helping us all. Blessings.

          2. As I mentioned before, I don’t think I would worry about the IgM. Looking at that one graph, it may take some time for anti-hBc IgM to disappear. I would not be basing my results on the core antibody test and particularly the IgM test. it is the most likely test to have false positives. Sometimes it is positive when a person with chronic HBV is experiencing a flare, which I do not believe you are doing. it’s just not the marker you want to base everything on. It sounds like you have cleared the infection, but wait 3 months and retest if you prefer. If you have serious concerns, test to see if you have a viral load in 3 months, if you continue to worry.

      2. Also, we don’t have any specific specialist for liver in this part of country, so I like to have your advice for me

        1. Please feel free to take a look at HBF’s directory of liver specialists at http://www.hepb.org/resources/liver_specialist_directory.htm .This list is not exhaustive, but does provide you with liver specialists who have either registered their information or patients who have registered their doctor. If there is not a doctor in your area, then I would encourage you to look for one at a large hospital center, teaching or research hospital. People typically see their liver specialist one to 2 times a year and may choose to travel a bit to do so.

    1. If you are just learning of your infection, then you are probably trying to figure out if you have an acute or chronic infection. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. Ask your doctor for a hepatitis B panel at that time. If you are experiencing worrisome symptoms then talk to your doctor about checking your liver function and liver enzymes and a CBC.

  104. Please sir, I need answers to my question.i am a hep b carrier. If I have unprotected sex with someone who is has already been vaccinated with the hep b vaccine and is already protected from hep b, can he infect someone else after sleeping with me? Thank you.

    1. As long as you know for sure that person generated adequate immunity to the virus, then the partner would be fine. Most likely they did generate adequate immunity if they completed all 3 shots of the series, but you can ask your partner to get an anti-HBs titer if they wish to confirm immunity.

  105. Pls do you know if someone that had acute hep b in 2002 but has been cleared now can donate egg for Ivf

  106. Hello Sir
    I live in Afghanistan have HBs positive more than ten year but The didn’t suggested any treatments
    And my HBs Ag index value is going up every year and my new test are:
    HBs Ag 257 reactive
    Elisa anti HBe reactive Index v 0.o
    Elisa HBe Ag Non reactive I v 0.0

    HBV DNA Titer : 803 iu/ml
    SGPT 54
    Need your suggestion
    Thank you

    1. Based on guidelines, you would likely not be treated at this time since your viral load is not too high and you are HBeAg negative. Your ALT is a bit elevated. Consider healthy lifestyle choices you might be able to make: NO alcohol, no smoking, maintaining a healthy weight through a well balanced diet and exercise. Please note the guidelines so you can discuss with your doctor if you wish. Management of CHB – Lok Practice and How it relates to the guidelines (January 2014) http://www.natap.org/2014/HBV/011614_01.htm

  107. hello sir i am not good side of language
    but i can suggest my problem i have experienced such like symptoms
    joundice yellowish eye joints pain tired nausea no itching no vomit bloat bally
    i am 20 yrs old who infected with hepatitis b
    i visited hepatoligst or gastroenterology dr he already diagnosed me
    result acute hbs b posptive antigen negative antibody posotive viral load 565 iu copies mildly hypoch i diagnosed 1 month ago and now it is after 1 monthand 2o day aftr so i already remove all syptoms and i am feeling pretty so pls
    give me advise also
    my viral load does it high or low god bless u

    regards
    helper thnk u

    1. Be sure to repeat testing be sure you clear your HBV infection. 90% of healthy adults newly (acute) infected with HBV will clear the infection on their own. Most have few or no symptoms. You must repeat testing to be sure you have cleared the infection. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. Please take care while you wait to confirm. Your viral load is not too high, but you must assume you are infectious. Please practice safe sex and take care to keep open cuts etc covered and keep personal items that may have trace amounts of blood out of reach of others (razors, toothbrushes) as accidental sharing can cause transmission. HBV is transmitted through direct contact with blood and body fluids.

  108. Dr gave me essential capsule
    and recommended me to reduce the fat and oil as well taking rest and plenty of water and he said sustain until 4 month then diagnose again after 4 month almost adult can get rid of this pandemic disease
    so plz give me deep advise that cool down my heart because i have met such phobia or stress towards this

    1. I would agree that you want to take good care of your liver at this time with plenty of water, healthy foods, NO alcohol or smoking. Be sure to retest within 6 months.

  109. warm great
    thanks dear sir for your answer
    i agree your recommendation and i will diagnose again within 6 month
    also i already drink 4 or 5 liter of water per day
    as well as i reduce oil and fat as i avoid a heavy cover of the liver
    so could i drink a tea and the likes or shall a avoid it

    regard
    helper thanks so much

    1. There is not a problem with tea and coffee. Be sure to watch your sugar intake as well – sugar founds in refined sugars in sweets and sodas.Please continue to eat fruits with natural sugars. In general, do your best to eat “healthy” and be sure to avoid all of the fast, processed foods from places like Burger King or KFC etc.

  110. I used to test for HBSAG positive, along with HBCAb and HBeAb.

    However 2 months after being hospitalized I have tested and HBSAG is negative, or undetectable. However Since it became negative, it has been 2.5 months since then, and my body didnt even develop the antibodies HBSAB. Do keep in mind that I was tested IGM positive and doctors gave me a acute diagnosis.

    Why arent I producing HBSAB, why cant I eradicate the virus and be immune once and for all. my ALT+AST are perfect now, even better than before, all symptoms have gone away, my bilirubin is back. Everything is normal.

    HOWEVER in 3 weeks it will mark 6 months since onset of symptoms, and it will DECIDE MY FATE whether I will be one of the carriers or a person who has beaten it. Help me understand why this window period is taking so long with me, will I forever not develop antibodies and HBSAG will lurk and start populating again?

    God I hate this life.

    1. 6 months is a guideline, sometimes a takes a bit more time, so please repeat testing. If it was an acute case, hopefully it will resolve. Possibly it was an acute exacerbation of a chronic infection? There is no way for me to know for sure. I know you want to immediately develop antibody, and I hope you do, but if not, it would be a good place to be HBsAg negative if you do in fact have a chronic infection. You may want to confirm with a viral load test, but of course I suggest that you see a liver specialist.

      1. How can it be acute exacerbation of a chronic infection if hbsag becomes negative? and dna is negative? I really dont understand.

        Liver specialist says he cannot understand my case this is what he said:
        1- It cant be chronic, because both hbsag and hbeag are negative.
        2- it cant be occult chronic, because dna is less than 110 iu/ml
        3- it cant be acute exacerbation of a chronic infection, because only IGM antibodies are there, in acute exacerbation of a chronic infection both IGG and IGM shows up, due to past infection and new mutation.
        4- it cant be a false test because hb core antibody (hbcab) is there in all repeated tests, and i was never vaccinated.

        doctor also told me that there is nothing wrong with my immunity system, my body already fought off the following viruses and developed antibodies (IGG succesffully)

        1- CMV virus
        2- EBV virus
        3- HSV type 1
        4- influenza virion IV
        5- Rubella

        and now this stupid hepatitis disease…

        1. I believe I have redundantly replied to you. Sorry. There is no thread to any of the questions as I view them in the wordpress dashboard. I am not a doctor, but I’ve been dealing with chronic HBV for 17 years and I personally know people that are HBsAg negative, HBsAb negative and have undetectable viral loads. It’s possible with time that you’ll gain the antibody, but would not be unusual for you to never gain the antibody. You’re not doing anything wrong. Chronic HBV and the immune response to the virus is very complicated. It doesn’t mean there is anything wrong with your immune system, but for whatever reason, you did not completely seroconvert. It’s hard to learn all of this at one time. Others I know were actually quite happy to lose HBsAg as they had been aware of their chronic illness for some time. They would have been more thrilled to gain the antibody, but they’re okay with being HBsAg negative with an undetectable viral load. All things are relative. You could be in a much worse place. There’s not a person out there that wants to have this chronic disease…

  111. Hi,
    If you can help me with this situation I really appreciate it. Every year I get my physical with no issues. This year, I did my physical and my doctor told me that my blood tests showed that I have Hepatitis. So I went to the liver doctor. He did a blood test and ultrasound. Ultrasound is fine. However, straight of the bat, after my blood results came back, the liver doctor said I have chronic hepatitis B and that I need to see him in 2 months to start treatment
    – How is that possible? I was thinking he can know for sure if it’s acute or chronic after 6 months! Help me please, I am thinking of going to another liver doctor.

    1. Generally chronic HBV is confirmed 6 months after the first positive HBsAg test. Is is possible you were not tested at the time of your previous physical? Testing for HBV is not part of the average physical. Sometimes with more detailed lab work a liver specialist may have a feeling that the patient is chronically infected – “intuition”. However, if you are uncomfortable, I would not discourage you from getting a 2nd opinion. You wouldn’t want to start treatment without knowing more – confirming you are chronic, HBe status, viral load etc. You don’t want to start treatment if you would not benefit from it at this time.

  112. Is it possible to decrease hapititus b (hbsag) lower than .05 with in week now it is 250 and doctor declare by quantitative report which is less than 3.8 only hapititus b carrier because a govt co declare medically unfit and they given next chance of test after a week.

    1. Basically you are asking if you can make your HBsAg negative, which unfortunately is impossible to “make” happen if you are chronically infected. If this is an acute infection then is will most likely clear (greater than 90% of healthy adults clear an new, acute HBV infection within 6 months)If this is a chronic infection there are a very lucky 2-3% that clear the infection on their own, but no way to make it happen with a drug, a food or a process. I am very sorry that your government is declaring that you are unfit as a result of a positive HBV test. It is unfair and totally unnecessary. There is nothing about chronic HBV that should keep you from doing your job properly and you will not endanger others.

  113. Hmmm Dr I thought it is possible to change HSbag to postive by applying a sequential therapy if it is less than 1000iu/ml because i knew from the medhelp who already change it by a combo therapy. Thanks!

    1. Possible yes. Probable no. It is your best shot at clearing HBsAg, but the serconversion rates are still low – less than 10%. I don’t call that a slam dunk. there are also the lucky 2-3% that will clear chronic HBV spontaneously, but is there a way to “make” that happen? Unfortunately no. I am not at all adverse to immune modulators, but they are not for everyone. I’m not a doctor, but I look at the data. This is from November, easy to read: http://www.aidsmap.com/Adding-pegylated-interferon-to-tenofovir-improves-odds-of-HBsAg-loss-in-hepatitis-B-patients/page/2922867/

  114. Hi doc,
    I got tested non reactive around .3 yesterday. However my househelp who was just 3 days with us got tested reactive for hepa b.
    Should i get immunized and vaccine asap? her hbsag is around 1.24 > 1.0 which is the border line.

    Quite worried about it. I am not touching anything at home. I will clean the place after 10 days since she left.

    Will alcohol and lysol clean the hepa n virus in case she has body fluids in the area????

    Thanks for the reply

    1. Yes. I’m not sure of the timing and contact, but it is always a good idea to get vaccinated. Its a 3 shot series so be sure to complete the series so you never need to concern yourself with hepatitis B, which is common in 3/4 of the world. Just living with someone does not mean you will definitely get infected. It’s about direct contact with blood and body fluids. HBV can live on the surfaces for a month. It’s readily killed with a light bleach solution (1 part bleach to 9 parts water).

  115. Hello,

    I was diagnosed as having an acute hepatitis B in october 2014, doctors found that i had IGM antibodies positive and decided that I will be labeled an acute case for the time being until 6 months has passed. I was HbsAg positive with hepatitis symptoms when admitted to hospital.

    In december, two months after diagnosis, Labs gave me the report having lost the hbsag antigen in my body, it was negative. However the hbsab antibody that shows lifelong immunity is notavilable. The test was repeated in january, february and march, and it kept showing hbsag being negative, and no antibodies yet.

    My doctor got scared because the core window period is over 2-3 months, and he is confused how can I not be immune yet, He is scared that I might have occult chronic infection which means hepatitis b chronic with very low antigen in body.

    He ordered a DNA quantitative test, and the TAQMAN test showed undetectable levels less than <20 iu/ml. He said that It cant be occult because an occult chronic infection must still show positive DNA count of around 90-140 iu/ml.

    I am really tired, I fought with all the medical staff and was banned from hospital for life, and my papers were transfered to another one. I had a major fight because I kept requesting the doctor to give me pegy interferon, because I read it simply puts your immunity on supercharged mode and in return could trigger HBSAB formation.

    How did HBSAG vanish from being count in the millions to undetectable? I dont even have the antibodies, how?!

    1. I’m not completely sure of your situation – the timing, etc. Most with an acute infection will clear it within 6 months. However, sometimes a person will also have an acute exacerbation of a chronic infection which can result in a positive anti-hcb IgM result. Thats what it sounds like with your situation, and that your body attempted seroconversion but it was not successful (loss of HBsAg and gaining of the antibody). There are certainly many others out there that are HBsAg negative, HBsAb negative and have a low or undetectable viral load. Perhaps it’s not as common, but it certainly happens.

      There would likely be no benefit to taking PEG interferon. Your body certainly mounted a quite an immune response if you ended up in the hospital. Immune modulators is likely not the answer, and it is a very difficult protocol. Perhaps it is good you’re going to a different hospital so you can have someone else take a look at your case. 2nd opinions can be very valuable!

      I would encourage you to continue with regular monitoring and to take care with your liver health by avoiding alcohol, smoking and maintaining a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise.

  116. Hi last month I had an accident and I had been reported HBsAg +ve. After that I had some test as:-
    H Be Antigen- negative
    Anti H Be- positive
    IGM Anti HBcAg- negative
    Dr. didn’t prescribe any medicine for me and told me that come when u have jaundice like symptoms. Let me know that I should marry or not ? Whether it is curable or not??

    1. I am sorry to hear of your unexpected diagnosis. It sounds like you have a chronic infection, which is indicated with a negative anti-hcb IgM. You are HBeAg negative which typically indicates a less active phase of the virus. You don’t note a viral load or mention your liver enzyme results or liver function tests in particular your ALT/AST. You know it is true that many with chronic HBV, and often those in the less active phase of the virus, do not benefit from treatments currently available. At this time there is no complete cure, but rather, treatments that control the virus, but if you are in this inactive phase there is no benefit to them. However I would disagree that you would only need medication if you are jaundiced or have more extreme symptoms. Treatment decisions should be based on a number of factors including your age, family history, any evidence of liver disease via ultrasound/fibroscan/APRI ratio. Also it’s important to at least take a look at your ALT/AST as this is a pretty good indication of HBV activity in the liver and it is a simple, inexpensive test. So are the tests used to calculate the APRI ratio. I am sending you a link to the new WHO guidelines. Take a look, share them with a liver specialist, ask for your test results and discuss it all with your liver specialist. You might very well not require any treatment at all, but lets just be sure. If not, all you would require is regular monitoring in case things change with time. Here is the WHO link. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/154590/1/9789241549059_eng.pdf?ua=1&ua=1 .

      I know it is tough to learn of all of this, but there is absolutely no reason why you should not marry. Many with chronic HBV are living long, full lives with careers, family, marriage, family and more. HBV is a vaccine preventable disease. Be sure your sexual partners are protected through vaccination and through protected sex with a condom until they are fully vaccinated. One thing – I would encourage you to NOT drink alcohol. HBV and alcohol is a dangerous mix. Be sure to maintain a healthy weight through a well balanced diet and regular exercise.

  117. hello! i’m 22 years old and was diagnosed as HBaSg reactive on November 2013. I don’t know how long i have been infected during that time. I underwent another screening last April 2015 and had reactive result again so i decided to see a doctor and she advised me to took some lab test. Here are the results..
    HBeAg reactive
    ALT 16.78
    AST 0.00
    what does this mean?
    Should I be worried with this kind of result?
    The doctor said that my hepa B is Chronic. My partner seems to be not infected too. What are the chances that i will be transmitting hepa b to him?

    I am looking forward to hear from you. Thank you

    1. It hasn’t been 6 months, but it certainly looks like it’s a chronic infection. Your ALT is within normal ranges, which is good (<19 Iu/L for women, <30 Iu/L for men). Your AST of 0.00 doesn't make sense, but probably just a lab or transcription error. It wouldn't be zero so don't worry. If your partner is not infected or has not resolved a previous infection then he should be vaccinated. Have his doctor run a hepatitis B panel. Its one test but returns 3 results: HBsAg, HBcAb, HBsAb so you know if he has a current infection or has resolved a past infection and has antibodies. If he does not have antibodies or a past infection then he really should be vaccinated. Sounds like you are in the inactive phase of the virus and likely have a low or undetectable viral load. However that can change over time which is why regular monitoring is so important in case you would one day benefit from treatment if things change (viral load goes up, ALT elevates etc.) The other thing to keep in the back of your mind if you wish to become pregnant. you would want to be you are monitored carefully and would want to discuss birth prophylaxis to prevent transmission to the baby at birth. Mother to child transmission is probably the most common mode of transmission, but can be very effectively prevented with a birth dose of the HBV vaccine and if available, a shot of HBIG within 12-24 hours which is why it's so important to be sure to plan and discuss with your doctor and the hospital.

      1. hello it’s me again. thank you for the response but there is one thing i cant understand, i’ve consulted a doctor and she told me that i am in an ACTIVE phase and that i am highly infectious, but you said that i seem to be in an INACTIVE phase,so which is which?

        i also had a hepa b profile which has the ff. results?
        HbsAg- reactive- 244.7
        Anti Hbs-nonreactive-2.0
        HbeAg-reactive-1,657
        Anti Hbe(reverse)-non reactive-7.77
        Anti Hbc IgM-nonreactive-0.186
        Anti Hbc IgG(reverse-reactive-0.334

        should i be worried with the results?what should i do?

        1. Hello: I do not have your earlier post in front of me, and perhaps there was a typo in it, but your doctor is correct, when you test positive or reactive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg), it usually means you have a lot of virus (called HBV DNA) in your blood and the virus is actively replicating. To indicate if treatment is needed, you need to know your viral load (HBV DNA) and whether the infection is harming your liver, which is revealed by an ALT or SGPT (liver enzyme) test. Talk to your doctor about your viral load and ALT/SGPT test to see if treatment is needed. Good luck.

  118. I tested hbsag positive 4 months before.
    Hbsag – positive
    Hbe ag – negative
    Anti hbs – 0.57 IU/L
    Anti hcv – negative
    hbv viral load- 82 IU/ml

    My mom dad tested negative but my brother tested positve for hbsag
    Whether i’m acute or chronic? If i’m chronic whether i will be a carrier? Whether i can live a normal life ? Whether i can marry and have children?

    1. If you continue to test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then you are considered chronically infected. Interesting that your mom and dad are HBsAg negative, but your brother is positive. Please know that if you learn that you are chronically infected and a carrier (a carrier is nothing more than being HBsAg positive, and does not indicate anything more), that you really can live a full life with a career, friends, family, love and children. You just need to be sure to take good care of yourself. If you are chronically infected, commit to getting regular monitoring by a liver specialist and treatment if it is recommended. By the looks of your numbers, if you are chronically infected, you would likely not require treatment, but be sure to see a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and the health of your liver. Commit to making healthy choices. Do NOT drink alcohol, and avoid smoking and environmental toxins, and be sure to maintain a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise. HBV is vaccine preventable so you will want to be sure your future partners are prevented with the 3 shot HBV vaccine series. Until protected, be sure to practice sex using condoms. HBV is very innocently passed from an HBV positive mother to her baby at birth, but there is a very simple way to prevent transmission from mother to baby and you can do that and break the cycle of transmission. Baby receives a birth dose of the HBV vaccine and a shot of HBIG within 12 hours of birth. This is effective 95% of the time. So I know it would be a lot to take in and learn if you determine that you have a chronic infection, but if you are, you really can live a good life. You are not alone out there with your HBV

  119. I got my Hep Panel back and it says:
    – Hepatitis B Surface Antigen= Presumptive Reactive
    Everything else looks normal except (AST=75 u/l and ALT= 113 u/l ) and Hepatitis B visus DNA=4.94

    -What does “Presumptive Reactive” please mean? Positive or Negative or what?
    – I hope it’s acute Hep B.

    Thank you

    1. Most likely you are positive for hepatitis B. I cannot tell you if this is an acute or chronic infection at this time. If you continue to test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then it would be considered a chronic infection. If you learn you have a chronic infection, then you will want to see a liver specialist to learn more.

  120. hi
    i had hepatitis b my doctor suggested to vaccinate my wife and vaccinated as 0,1,2 months but i studied your article that the vaccination will be 0,1,6 months and i made a test of anti hbs titer i got 27 so further vaccination is required or not plz tell
    The vaccine brand is Revac B kindly give me the best answer

    1. I am not familiar with Revac B, so I am not sure of the schedule. I would talk to your doctor again, but perhaps this is an accelerated schedule in which case I would add a booster shot at one year to to boost durability.

  121. I am glad I found this site. Tons of useful information.

    Recently, both me and my partner went for blood tests. The results for him for HBsAg says “Reactive” and for me for HBsAg it says “Presumptive Reactive”. What’s the difference or is that the same?

    Thank you Dr.

    1. Thanks. Most likely you are also positive for hepatitis B as well. However, yours could be a new, acute infection and his could be a chronic infection, or both acute or both chronic. You can confirm your diagnosis by asking your doctor to run a hepatitis B panel which tests for HBsAg, HBcAb and HBsAb. If you test HBsAg positive, repeat testing in 6 months to determine if this is an acute or chronic infection. Your partner should repeat testing as well. A person is considered chronically infected if they continue to test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. If that happens with either of you, be sure you see a liver specialist. While you wait, take care to not transmit to others remembering that it is spread through direct contact with blood or infected body fluids, is a sexually transmitted disease, or through personal items that may have even trace amounts of blood on it. Take care of your liver by avoiding alcohol, avoid smoking and environmental toxins and be sure to take care eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise.

  122. I have been in shock when I went for my annual physical and the doctor told me I have Hepatitis B. I think I know the cause because I have been eating Fo-Ti (Polygonum Multiflorum) recently, which I stopped. So I did another blood test and these are the results:

    -Hepa Be Antigne= negative
    -Hepatitis B Surface Antigen= Presumptive Reactive
    -Hepatitis B Virus DNA= 4.16 (HBV DNA level is <20 IU/mL (<1.30 log IU/mL) )
    -Everything else looks normal except (AST=81 u/l and ALT= 101 u/l )
    -Hep B Surf AB IQ= nonreactive
    (All other Liver tests are fine)

    I really appreciate it if you can take a look at above results please and let me know your thoughts. Thank you very much.

    1. I am sorry to hear of your recent HBV diagnosis. I cannot say for sure if this is an acute (new) infection or chronic infection based on the information provided. Your ALT (SGPT) is elevated where normal is 30 or less for men and 19 or less for women. If you are resolving an acute infection, you should eventually look like this profile:
      HBsAg neg
      HBcAb pos
      HBsAb pos
      HBeAg neg
      HBeAb pos
      HBV DNA undetectable.
      if you continue to test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then this would be considered a chronic infection. While you wait,please take care of your liver health and avoid alcohol, take care with prescription or over the counter medications, supplements etc, and be sure to maintain a well balanced diet through diet and exercise. Be sue to avoid transmission by avoiding direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Practice safe sex and do not share personal items such as razors, toothbrushes or any items with trace amounts of blood on them. If you learn you have a chronic infection, please see a liver specialist to learn more.

  123. Doctor,

    I have 2 question please:
    1- If someone continues to test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months, then it’s Chronic. Why exactly 6 months? Can it be longer or shorter?

    2- In the States, what’s the easiest way to have a Hep B test blood/panel done without going through a liver doctor? I am looking for a cheaper way of doing it then I can interpret my results myself of post them online.

    Thank you.

    1. 1. That is a generalization, but most will clear an acute infection within 6 months. Every person’s immune system is different.
      2. It’s Hepatitis Awareness Month. You could ask about screening events this month. Hepatitis Testing Day is May 19th. Talk to your state’s viral hepatitis prevention coordinator to see if there is a screening event somewhere near you.You can also contact your local health department. Find your state Viral hepatitis prevention coordinator here: http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/Partners/HepatitisCoordsList.htm
      Hope this helps.

  124. sir
    iam having HBSAG Possitive since one year my wife has been vaccinated at 0,1,2 month intervals as my doctor suggested but i read your article that the periods should be 0, 1 and 6. I Tested my wife blood and the Anti HBS Titer value is 27. is there any further dosage is required?
    If required i should do the same with continous intervals…
    Plz suggest Iam fully confused

    1. I think I may have replied to this. I would consider getting a booster shot at 1 year since this looks like more of an accelerated schedule.

  125. I vaccinated with hepatitis B in dosages of 0,1&2 months but i studied it should be 0,1&6 i tested Anti HBS Titer its value is 27 IU/ml is there any dosage reqd

  126. Dear, Doctor
    Iwas diagnosed as hepatitis B carrier in October 2014
    with hepatitis B surface antigen level N Not Detected
    Hepatitis B core antibody level Detected . My Doctor said i was a carrier and the Virus is inactive and no liver damage and was advised for any medication at all
    what does that mean? can it be treated ? please Help Iam worried.
    Ihave been offered ajob at an elderly care home but they have put me on hold until my GP comfirms that im suitable to work. Will that affect my job? thankyou

    1. I would see about a hepatitis B panel – one blood test with 3 test results: HBsAg HBcAb, HBsAb. Right now I believe that you HAD a hepatitis B infection, but that you have resolved it. The only missing test result is the surface antibody (HBsAb) which tells you if you have immunity to hepatitis B. If you did resolve your infection then you should be HBsAg neg, HBcAb pos, HBsAb pos. The key here is really your surface antigen (HBsAg). If you are positive then you have a current infection, if not then likely you do not. Perhaps your doctor is not really familiar with HBV.

    1. It means that at this time you have a hepatitis B infection. I cannot tell you if it is acute (new) or chronic. If a person tests HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then it is considered a chronic infection. You could also ask your doctor to run an anti-hcb IgM test. This is not always definite, but often it is positive if this is a new acute infection, but is sometimes the result of an acute exacerbation of a chronic infection. While you wait to retest, be sure to avoid transmission to others. HBV is spread through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. keep cuts, open sores etc. covered, practice safe sex or be sure partners or vaccinated to protect against HBV and do not share personal items such as razors, toothbrushes, nail clippers or anything that might have trace amounts of blood on them. Take care of your liver health by NOT drinking alcohol, take care with medications and try to eat a healthy well balanced diet. If this is an acute infection, then you will probably clear it like 90% or more of healthy adults, but if you learn it is a chronic infection then you will want to see a liver specialist to learn more.

  127. Hi, am really wondered after looked into all the posts and your reply for each this is really great service by you. Thanks for your possitive reply which gives self confidence to all the patients. u r doing great job keep it up.
    My friend diagnosed in 2009 he contracted with hepatitis b chronic, he never go for blood check thereafter he is very healthy than normal and he had very well knowledge about hbv. He is 24 years old he not at all bother about his disease, but now he is in full afraid that he kissed her girl friend 4 times who is aged 16 years but no sexual contact his doubt is whether she would also be affected hbv through deep mouth kiss. I would like to know whether he can get marriage and have normal sex i.e unprotected sex after vaccinated. How safe the vaccine is, even when affected persons wound touches the unaffected person wound will it transfer to vaccinated person please give ur valuable suggestions thanks in advance. You are doing great service once again thanks

    1. Thanks for your queries. First, kissing does not spread hepatitis B, unless you have a mouth sore and are bleeding from your lips or gums and kiss someone who has not been vaccinated against hepatitis B. Referring to marriage and sexual relationships, as long as the partner is immunized with the full three doses of the vaccine and has been tested to show they have enough antibodies (also called titers) to stop infection, then you can have unprotected sex. However, until then, it is very important to use condoms because semen can spread hepatitis B.
      If infectious blood from an open wound enters an uninfected person’s body through a cut or wound, you can catch hepatitis B. However, if you are vaccinated you are protected even if you come into contact with infectious body fluids, such as blood or semen.
      Lastly, I am not aware of hair loss as a symptom of heptitis B. Thanks

    1. You do not need the vaccine because your immune system has already built up lots of antibodies to fight off your hepatitis B infection when it cleared the infection. You’re all set!

        1. Hi Ann, To date, research shows there are no ill effects from getting a hepatitis B immunization after you have resolved your infection.

  128. Hello. I get my blood tested and the result is
    Hepatitis b antigen rapid test : non reactive
    Hepatitis b antibody rapid test: negative.
    What does it mean?..i was vaccinated on 2012.

    1. If I understand you correctly, according to the test you are negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and also negative for the hepatitis B surface antibody. When you are vaccinated, you were given three injections of the hepatitis B surface antigen. This is a protein that covers the virus. Your immune system is supposed to notice the antigen and produce hepatitis B surface antibodies to fight this foreign antigen. This protects you from any future infection from the real hepatitis B virus. It seems your immune system did not produce a lot of surface antibodies (also called titers). You may still be immune, but if I were you I would ask your doctor for a vaccine booster (one more hepatitis B vaccine shot) to see if it can trigger your immune system to create more antibodies. This is important if you go into the health care field and could be exposed to infectious body fluids, or if you have a partner with hepatitis B.

      1. Thank you very much for answering me and for your concern. 🙂 My doctor suggest me to take the vaccine again so I had my first shot on 6th June.Is it okay to take all the 3 shots of vaccine again ? 🙂

        1. Hi Tina, To date, There are no ill effects from getting a repeat hepatitis B immunization. Often people get two full cycles of the vaccine shots if they don’t respond the first time.

  129. Hi doc,again i have my new lab test.
    Hbv dna >110 000 000 iu/ml
    +igm=11 PEI; cutoff(neg10PEI)
    +hbsag(value last april 2015 is 17.55 )
    Sgpt=69.76 last april (cutoff 45)
    +hbsag(value last May 2015 is 18.01)
    Sgpt=42 last May (Cut off 45)

    Doc what do you think my phase ?The hbsag value increase a little with in a month..
    I did not experience,any symptoms of hbv last april.

    1. Hello, It is difficult to assess your phase of hepatitis B. Your viral load is quite high, I assume you test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg)? Your sgpt is slightly elevated, but not severely. Depending on your age and gender, I assume you are still in the immune tolerant stage and have tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months so you are sure you are chronically infected. I recommend you continue to see your doctor for regularly screenings, eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol, which can damage your liver. You can lead a healthy and happy life with hepatitis B. As long as you are getting monitored regularly and leading a healthy lifestyle, you are doing all you can.

  130. Hello,i was just recently told,by my doctor that i am acute,i was diagnosed this april 2015 and it is not six month yet.What will i do not to be belong to the 10% acute hbv to becone chronic?I have manage to bring back my sgpt level to normal within a few months.Is it normal that hbv dna is too high?my age is 21.

    1. Hello, The best thing you can do is eat healthy foods and refrain from alcohol. Having high viral loads (HBV DNA) is common during an acute infection, they can peak into the millions before the immune system controls the infection. I know it is hard to wait several more months before you know if your infection is acute or chronic, try not to worry and just take good care of your health. Good luck.

  131. hi can I ask because my ist medical result diadnose I have problem in blood which is hepa b, then u do second opinion in other clinic and the result is negative, then after that they advise again to check in the ist clinic and the again in the ist clinic is desame but they told if doesnt mean they saw the in the blood is positive, so in the third opinion in the ist one clinic the result now is clear.my question is this posibleim clear or not clear.please I need your help because im hir in other country then my problem in my blood which hepa b leak and im worried about that..tnx u

    1. Hello, I’m sorry to hear about the confusing test results. Unfortunately, in some regions lab tests are not accurate and you can get a “false” positive test result for hepatitis B. Also, some labs have more sterile conditions than others. Do you think one of the labs you used is more professional or better quality than the other? Perhaps that lab’s results are the ones you should trust. I would suggest you see a liver specialist or doctor who is familiar with hepatitis B and tell him or her about the conflicting test results. You can also wait a month or two and have the test retaken at the lab that has the most sterile conditions. Meanwhile, take good care of your health. Good luck.

  132. Hi ,im 24 y/o and a dental student , but i havent got HBV vaccines. Recentely i was tested for HEpatitis B ag and i was negative , but my HBs antibody is at 3.0 , im scared and i do not know what is going on ,
    I should mention i have minor thalassemia . And my total bilirubin is 1.80
    Direct bilirubin 0.54
    ALT16
    AST15
    LDH 169
    CPK 62
    Please guide me through this.
    Thank you

    1. Hello, If I understand, you have never been immunized against hepatitis B, but when you were screened you tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antibody at a level of 3 mIU/mL. This means in the past you were either immunized during childhood and didn’t realize it, or you have been infected with hepatitis B in the past and your immune system cleared the infection and you are now “cured.”
      All medical and dental schools should require students to be immunized and tested for hepatitis B surface antibodies (also called titers) to make sure you are protected against hepatitis B because as a dentist you are at high risk of coming into contact with infectious blood and body fluids. According to current health standards, you are considered protected against hepatitis B if you have titers/antibodies levels of 10 mnIU/mL or higher. Because your current level is 3 mIU/mL, you may want to get a hepatitis B vaccine booster (only one shot) to see if it raises your antibody count so the school considers you fully protected. You can also safely get the full three-dose series of the vaccine if a single booster shot doesn’t generate enough titers. If you have additional questions talk to your doctor. Please don’t worry, you are health. Go get the vaccine booster and have your titers retested. Good luck.

  133. I’ve been tested for hepatitis B and it was negative. I get my vaccine and just completed the second shot. Is it safe to have sex with infected partner after the second shot? My third short will be on december if I’m not mistaken and I’m getting married by next week, to a hep.B carrier.

    1. Hello, Doctors recommend that you wait until after all three vaccine shots, and a blood test shows you have enough hepatitis B antibodies (called titers) to protect you from infection. About one or two months after your third shot, go to your doctor for a blood test to check the amount of titers you have. To be considered fully protected, you should have more than 10 mIU/mL titer levels in your blood. Until then, it is very important that you practice safer sex and use condoms during all sexual activity to prevent exposure to infectious semen and body fluids.

  134. Hi, i am 28 years old and i was told that i had hepatitis b reaction in my blood when i when i wanted to donte blood to my sister in May so the medical officer told me to come back after 3 months to confirm It but i insisted and went back to confirm on the 12th of June and found out that i am hbsag positive. My results are ast 71, alt, 34,ggt 50,bilirubin 13, alk 70, what dose these results mean? Dose it i am acute or chronic? The medical office told me to go back and chk after 3 months, should i go back at the time or after 6 months? My girl friend got tested but she dosent have it. I am worried. Will i be able to have kids? I am not experiencing any sign and symptoms, dose I. Mean its acute?

    1. Hello, I am sorry you have tested positive for hepatitis B. If I understand correctly, you first tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in May and were retested in June and tested positive again. If you were recently infected, after a brief or “acute” infection you may clear the infection after several months. If you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, then you have a chronic infection. Often, there are no noticeable side effects from hepatitis B, so many people don’t know they have it until they try to donate blood or have a test as part of a regular medical check-up. In order to find out if you are chronically infected, you will have to wait until six months after your May test (November). When you return for a test, make sure they check your liver health (the ALT level in your lab report is a key indicator of your liver health.) Your ALT level is a little above normal, which is 30 for men and 19 for women. Also, make sure they test for your hepatitis B “e” antigen and antibody status also. If you test positive at that time, you should see a liver specialist (a hepatologist or gastroenterologist).
      In the meantime, take care of your liver by avoiding alcohol and smoking, and eat healthy foods. During this time you should consider yourself infectious. HBV is not spread casually, but is is transmitted through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Be sure to keep cuts, bites, etc covered, practice safe sex using a condom since HBV is transmitted sexually, and keep personal hygiene items such as toothbrushes, razors, body jewelry or nail clippers (anything that might have trace amounts of blood on them) separate from others so they are not accidentally shared. Good luck.

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  135. About two weeks ago, I was diagnosed hbv positive and my test result is ALT 54 u/i . Please can u tell me something about the result. I will be thankful to hear from u.

    1. Hello: ALT (alanine aminotransferase) is an enzyme that liver cells release when they are damaged or die. When ALT levels go above 30 in men and 19 in women, it means there is some liver damage occurring. A rise in ALT levels can also happen if you are sick in general, and may not be related to your hepatitis B infection. An ALT level of 54 u/i is not extremely high, but I hope you are seeing a liver specialist (a hepatologist or gastroenterologist) regularly to monitor your infection.
      Was this diagnosis the first time you were told you had hepatitis B? If it was, you should return in six months to be retested to find out if you have a short-term infection or a long-term chronic infection. In the meantime, take care of your liver by avoiding alcohol and smoking, and eat healthy foods. During this time you should consider yourself infectious. HBV is not spread casually, but is is transmitted through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Be sure to keep cuts, bites, etc covered, practice safe sex using a condom since HBV is transmitted sexually, and keep personal hygiene items such as toothbrushes, razors, body jewelry or nail clippers (anything that might have trace amounts of blood on them) separate from others so they are not accidentally shared. Good luck.

  136. Thank you for the advise, if i am chronic, will i be able to have kids? And can i migrate to other countries? I have been so worried. As my fiance is from a different country and we trying to migrate there but i am afraid i might not going be accepted. I had The Australian scientists has discovered a treatment for hepatitis b combining the cancer drug n art drug to cure 100% successfully many mice infected with the virus. Now they are doing human trails. Do u think it will cure human too? I am currently drinking vuta plus a herbal juice treatment that enhance immune system. Do think its ok? N can help my immunity to fight the virus? I am so worried, can i live a normal life if i am a chronic patient?

    1. Hello, Yes you can live a normal life and have children if you have a hepatitis B infection. To make sure your children do not become infected, make sure they are vaccinated against hepatitis B within 12 hours of birth and also given HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) if it’s available in your region. Your children must receive all of the three hepatitis B vaccine doses to be fully protected. The vaccine is given at birth, 30 days later, and then six months after the first dose.
      Right now, there is no cure for hepatitis B but researchers believe there may be a cure developed in the next several years.
      It is important that you see a liver specialist about your hepatitis B. The doctor will know if you will ever need treatment, and he or she will tell you if the herbal juice supplement you are using is safe. Generally, doctors advise you to eat healthy and refrain from drinking alcohol and smoking, and they recommend you get tested regularly to monitor the infection.
      Unfortunately the Gulf Coast countries (UAE etc) will not grant work permits to anyone who tests HBsAg positive. This is unnecessary and unfair, but each country has its own policies. You will want to carefully look into the immigration details for countries of interest, and make sure there is no pre-employment testing in your field of work. In general, countries such as the US, Canada, Australia and most European countries do not screen for hepatitis B, though I have learned recently that Canada may ask for a viral load test. I am afraid I do not have any details, and I can only encourage you to look closely into immigration laws. Good luck.

  137. Hello Sir,

    I read all the answers and ur valuable feedback to the ppl and thanks in advance for being so kind. My mom needs has gallbladder operation due to sone stones in her gallbladder( contracted gallbladder full with lithiasis) .but she had blood test in 2012 and she had Hbe Ag non reactive (0.35) cut off index for non reactive <1.0. TSH 1.48 ug/dl 0.47-4.64.
    The same test showed in Jun 2014:
    Hbs Ag +
    HbeAg NR
    ALT 22
    0/5-@
    ALT(SGPT) 33 U/L 10-40
    TSH 1.00 mlU/ml 0.35-4.94

    The result of Nov 2014:
    HBsAg+
    eAg NR
    ALT 22
    0/5-@
    LFT1/2-ALT 23

    Right now her ALT(SGPT ) is 193u/l
    AST (SGOT) 177 U/l
    Alk. Phosphate 525 u/l
    s.bilirubin (total) 2.4 mg/dl

    And i am going to check her blood next week as well so
    PLAESE GIUDE ME what it shows and what should we do ? can we do the gallbladder operation ? Is her HBS dangeriouse??

    Regards
    Fahim Sir,

    I read all the answers and ur valuable feedback to the ppl and thanks in advance for being so kind. My mom needs has gallbladder operation due to sone stones in her gallbladder( contracted gallbladder full with lithiasis) .but she had blood test in 2012 and she had Hbe Ag non reactive (0.35) cut off index for non reactive <1.0. TSH 1.48 ug/dl 0.47-4.64.
    The same test showed in Jun 2014:
    Hbs Ag +
    HbeAg NR
    ALT 22
    0/5-@
    ALT(SGPT) 33 U/L 10-40
    TSH 1.00 mlU/ml 0.35-4.94

    The result of Nov 2014:
    HBsAg+
    eAg NR
    ALT 22
    0/5-@
    LFT1/2-ALT 23

    Right now her ALT(SGPT ) is 193u/l
    AST (SGOT) 177 U/l
    Alk. Phosphate 525 u/l
    s.bilirubin (total) 2.4 mg/dl

    And i am going to check her blood next week as well so
    PLAESE GIUDE ME what it shows and what should we do ? can we do the gallbladder operation ? Is her HBS dangeriouse??

    Regards
    Fahim

    1. Hello: There are many things that cause ALT (SGPT) to rise above normal other than a hepatitis B infection. Her ALT/SGPT) may be above normal right now because of the gall bladder problems she is having. If her doctor sees no problem and is willing to go ahead with surgery to remove her gall bladder, her hepatitis B should not exacerbate her condition. Good luck.

      1. Thank you so much for response !
        And is that possible to remove her HBV or how it is possible to cure it? is that possible to be come active and do vaccination? My mom is so worry about that and always dreams how to get ride of it?
        What deos it shows: Hbs Ag+, eAg NR?

        Thanks

        1. Hello: Right now there is no absolute cure for hepatitis B. Your mother’s test results show is infected with the virus (because she tests positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen). A vaccine is not needed once someone is infected. Her test results show she tests negative for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg), this may be a good thing because when one loses HBeAg, generally your viral load decreases.
          As mentioned, her ALT levels are elevated, but that may result because she is having gall bladder problems. Generally, treatment is needed if there are consistent signs of liver damage and if she has an elevated viral load (HBV DNA) in her blood. A few weeks after her gall bladder surgery, she should get checked again to see if her ALT levels have decreased. She should see a liver specialist so she can be regularly monitored.
          Have you and any of your siblings been tested for hepatitis B? It is common for children born to infected mothers to become infected. It is important that you be screened, and immediately vaccinated if you have not been already.
          Good luck.

          1. Thank u so much for the great explaination! Yes i will take her to Liver specialized in 2 days. At family we all checked our selves for HBV but hopefully we all are negative and we took vaccination 3 times.

  138. I was exposed to HBV virus during attending a knee surgery, I am working as srubb nurse, I am 28 years old . I was not vaccinated before exposing to virus, after exposing I have vaccinated. How many percent chances to infect with hepatitis b vaccine? what are the treatment options available for preventive medications available to avoid this infection?

    1. Hello: If I understand you, you were exposed to hepatitis B-infected blood while working as a nurse during an operation. You were immediately vaccinated with the first of the three-dose hepatitis B vaccine, which is excellent. You could also have been treated with HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) immediately following exposure. Your risk of infection depends on whether the infectious blood entered your body through a cut or opening on your skin or through a needle stick. Please make sure you receive your second hepatitis B vaccine dose 30 days after your first shot, and the third dose six months after your first shot. As you know from personal experience, health care workers are at high risk of bloodborne infections. For more detailed information about occupational exposures, please go to: http://www.hepb.org/professionals/post-exposure_guidelines_summary.htm
      Good luck.

  139. Dear Doctor,
    I am a man of 33 year old. I am preparing to get married in 4 months time. I have also been diagnosed of Hepatitis B positive. I want to know my chances of having children that will not be infected and my chances of living a normal life when I get married. Though my partner have been diagnosed of hepatitis B negative and she have been vaccinated.
    Will she later be infected with the virus?
    Please I want to know how I can live a normal life possibly get cure and what are the available drugs for this type of infection in Nigeria.
    Waiting to hear from you soon

    Best Regard

    1. Hello, Yes you can have a normal life and have children if you have a hepatitis B infection. First, congratulations on making sure your future wife has been vaccinated and you were honest with her about your hepatitis B. In addition to getting vaccinated, has she had a blood test to make sure she has enough hepatitis B antibodies (titers) to fight off infection? Doctors recommend that she has titers of at least 10 mIU/mL to be fully protected. If she does not, she can get a booster shot, or get the whole three vaccine shot series again. Once vaccinated, she should be immune to hepatitis B.
      To make sure your children do not become infected, make sure they are vaccinated against hepatitis B within 12 hours of birth and also given HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) if it’s available in your region. Your children must receive all of the three hepatitis B vaccine doses to be fully protected. The vaccine is given at birth, 30 days later, and then six months after the first dose.
      Right now, there is no cure for hepatitis B, but researchers believe there may be a cure developed in the next several years. There are effective antiviral medications available if your doctor finds that the virus is harming your liver. Among the best are tenofovir (Viread) and entecavir (Baraclude), so make sure you see a liver specialist.
      Also, eat healthy foods and refrain from drinking alcohol and smoking. Congratulations on your upcoming marriage. Good luck.

      1. I have been instructed to take Lamivudine 100mg/day for 180 days. Please I want to know how healthy it will be and what will be the result of this after the 180 days.

        1. Hello: Lamivudine is among the first antivirals approved for hepatitis B treatment. While it’s probably the least expensive and widely available in Africa, it’s not a very effective antiviral and people often develop drug resistance to it fairly quickly. The World Health Organization and other medical organizations recommend either two antivirals: either tenofovir (brand name Viread) or entecavir (Baraclude) for treatment. These antivirals are newer, probably more expensive, but they are very powerful and have very low rates of drug resistance. I am providing a link to the WHO’s treatment guidelines below. You may want to share them with your doctor.
          One more note. Antivirals work for only as long as you take them, so once you start them, so patients often stay on them for many months or even years–and never just for a few weeks. Therefore, before you begin treatment, you should find out if you actually need treatment. Have you had liver tests? One of the most important is the ALT (alanine aminotransferase) or SPGT test. This is a blood test that measures the level of ALT/SPGT in your blood. When liver cells are damaged or die, they release the ALT liver enzyme. If it is above 30 in men, this means you may be experiencing some liver damage from your infection. You may want to make sure your ALT is measured over several weeks or months and compare results to determine if treatment is needed. Good luck, the link to WHO’s treatment guidelines is below.
          Hepatitis B treatment guidelines from the World Health Organization. http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/

  140. Hi, two months ago I had blood testing to find out i am hepa b reactive. After less than two weeks taking liver supplement which was referred by a doctor I go back to the same diagnostic clinic and this time it’s negative. I would like to know was the first result real? The first test I almost fainted since the nurse tried three times before finally getting on my nerves. She really had a hard time. Please need your answer. Am I qualified to donate blood?thank you.

    1. Hello: I am sorry about all the stress you have experienced after your initial blood test. There are situations when a lab produces a “false positive” test result. It might be that the sample was tainted or that conditions were not sterile. Does that clinic have a good reputation for sterile conditions? I know blood draws are difficult for many people, but if there is another clinic with a good reputation nearby, you may want to have one more test to confirm the recent result.
      In terms of donating blood, it appears you can, however when you go to donate blood you may want to share the information about the two conflicting blood results. They will screen your blood and most centers will contact you if they find you are infected with hepatitis B. For more information about under your blood tests, go to this page: http://www.hepb.org/patients/your_blood_tests.htm
      Good luck.

  141. Sir, my sister was diagnosed with hbsag+ve a month ago. After a few tests that followed the result is Hbsag+ve, HBeAg -ve, anti HBe -ve; IgManti-HBc -ve.
    HBV Viral load is 6950copies/ml, ALT/SGPT is 20 U/L.
    Can u please help me understanding the stage of her disease and does she needs to be on treatment.

    1. Hello: I am sorry to hear of your sister’s hepatitis B. Before I answer the questions about her lab results, it’s important that she be tested again in six months to determine if this is a chronic (long-term) infection or a short-term, acute infection. If she was recently infected, she may be experiencing an acute infection and may be able to clear the virus after a brief infection. However, if she was infected during childhood and tests positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months, then it is a chronic infection.
      Have you and her other siblings been tested for hepatitis B? It’s important that you are all screened and vaccinated if you have not been infected.
      Now to her lab results, from what you shared, it appears that her viral load is relatively low, which is good. It means she does not have a lot of virus in her blood. And, her ALT/SGPT is not elevated. ALT (alanine aminotransferase) are enzymes that liver cells release when they are injured. For women, the normal range is around 19 or under for women, so her ALT levels are good.
      When you have her tests redone, make sure they test the hepatitis B “e” antigen and antibody. From what you indicated, she tested negative for both, which is confusing. The HBeAg status helps tell what stage she is in the hepatitis B infection cycle, so make sure that test is redone. Because there is no damage to her liver (due to normal ALT levels), it appears she does not need treatment, but it’s important that you consult with a liver specialist who has treated hepatitis B before.
      Hepatitis B is not spread casually, but make sure she covers any cuts or bruises and uses safer sex practices. Make sure household members are immunized with the full three vaccine doses.
      If/when she has children, it will be important to make sure they are immunized within 12 hours of birth and given HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) to protect them from infection. Tell her to eat healthy foods and refrain from alcohol and smoking, which harm the liver.
      Good luck.

  142. Hello. I have a few questions. First, can I get hepatitis B from my infected partner if we’re practising safe sex(using condoms)?… The second question is, I was late 2-3 days for my second vaccine shot, is the vaccine still effective ?.. Third is, can I get hepatitis B by sharing food with infected person, and touch any of his/her body fluids(semen, saliva, blood) but then wash my hand with alcohol/bleach. Thank you

    1. Hello: Using condoms reduces the risk that you will be infected, and getting vaccinated along with using condoms greatly reduces your risk, congratulations. The risk you will get infected depends on the amount of virus in your partner’s blood and body fluids. Someone with a high viral load (HBV DNA) will have lots of virus in their blood, semen and body fluids and poses a higher risk, so it’s important to use universal precautions and make sure blood or semen does not get into a wound, cut or other opening.
      The few days’ delay in getting your second vaccine dose should not be a problem. Make sure you get the third dose on time because with every vaccine shot your level of protection increases. Also, one or two months after your third vaccine dose, you should get tested for hepatitis B antibodies (titers) to make sure you have enough antibodies to protect you from hepatitis B. If your titer level isn’t high enough (above 10 mIU/mL) you may require a four vaccine booster dose.
      Sharing food does NOT transmit hepatitis B.
      Saliva usually does not transmit hepatitis B (unless there is blood from a mouth sore or cut). If you have a cut or bruise on your hand, I would refrain from allowing any body fluids near any openings in the skin.
      Generally, washing thoroughly with soap should disinfect your hands after contact.
      It sounds like you are taking good care of yourself, congratulations on getting immunized. Good luck.

      http://www.hepb.org/pdf/vaccine.pdf

  143. Sir, my wife is pregnant and in routine blood test HBsAg Rapid Screening Test result shows Non Reactive but the very next day with new blood sample by the same path-lab HBsAg Confirmation Test result shows confirmed Positive, is this possible that in one day the results varies from Non Reactive to Confirmed Positive

    1. Hello: I am sorry for the mixed results from the lab and the stress they must be causing. There are situations when a lab produces an incorrect lab test. It could be that the rapid screening lab test was flawed, faulty or contaminated in some way and gave a false “negative” reading and the confirmation test was correct or vice versa. Either way, it is important that your wife is retested. Make sure the lab you use has a reputation for using sterile equipment. Make sure they test for the hepatitis B surface antigen and antibody, the hepatitis B “e” antigen and antibody, and ALT/SGPT, which indicates how healthy her liver is.
      If she is found to have hepatitis B, it is critical that your baby is vaccinated with the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine within 12 hours of birth, and is given HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) if it is available.
      Also, you and all household members should also be tested for hepatitis B and vaccinated if you have not been infected.
      For more information about interpreting blood test results, go to this page: http://www.hepb.org/patients/your_blood_tests.htm
      For more information about pregnancy and hepatitis B, go to http://www.hepb.org/patients/pregnacy_and_hbv.htm
      Good luck.

  144. hello sir, I just got my test result today and I am going nuts right now. I am going to see the GP soon but in the meanwhile, cud you pls interpret as much as you can. Firstly , “he was found to have a positive HBsAg, positive HBcAb and our lab. confirm that his HBsAb is <10ml/ml."
    Secondly, its difficult to explain to my wife that I never cheated on her in 3years , so cud I have had this longer than 3years before its surfacing..
    3rdly we are trying to have kids how will this affect me/us? ( you cud email me if its okay by you)
    and the good news ( I hope) it also says "his liver function tests were normal"
    Thanks

    1. Based on the test result you shared, you have been infected with hepatitis B. If this is the first time you have been tested for hepatitis B, it is possible that you were infected at birth or during childhood — before you were married.
      Babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis B have a high chance of becoming infected themselves. Do you have brothers or sisters who have been screened for hepatitis B and found to be infected? It’s also possible to become infected through sexual activity (before your marriage) or through re-used and improperly sterilized syringes or medical equipment.
      It’s important that you are tested again in six months to determine if this is a chronic (long-term) infection or a short-term, acute infection. If you were recently infected with hepatitis B, you may be experiencing an acute infection and may be able to clear the virus after a few months. However, if you were infected during childhood and you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months, then you have a chronic infection. It will be important that your doctor test you for the hepatitis B e antigen and antibody (HBeAg). This can help tell you what stage your infection is at, and also test your viral load (HBV DNA – the amount of virus in your blood).
      It is good news that your liver is healthy. This is measured by an ALT/SGPT test. It measures the amount of the liver enzyme alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in your blood. When liver cells are damaged or die, this level rises above normal.
      Now, it is critical that your wife is immediately tested for hepatitis B. If she has not been infected, she needs to be immediately vaccinated. The vaccine is delivered in three doses, the second shot is administered 30 days after the first and the third shot is administered six months after the first. One to two months after her third vaccine shot, she should be tested to make sure she has enough protective antibodies (titers) to protect her from infection.
      Until you find out if she is protected, you should practice safe sex and use a condom. Also, be careful to bandage any cuts and don’t share razors or nail clippers so no one has contact with your blood. How infectious your blood or semen is depends on your viral load. If anyone else lives with you, they should be screened and immunized as well.
      The good news is you can have children. As soon as you make sure she is protected, you can have unprotected sex. Make sure your newborns are immunized within 12 hours of birth and given HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) to protect them from infection. Meanwhile, it is important for you to eat healthy foods and refrain from alcohol and smoking, which harm the liver. I’m sure your doctor will review these things with you, and you may be referred to a liver specialist (gastroenterologist or hepatologist) if one is available in your area. Good luck.

  145. Hi, I am sad today as my blood test show I am Hepatitis B Reactive. I go for blood test because I got yellowish skin and eyes and my skin is itchy. I have fever and flu buit that is about 4 weeks ago with feeling of acid coming up my chest making me feel likie vomiting at time past weeks but not severe. I am wondering, what should I do from now. Can I still go back to work? Can I still lead normal life? I am very confuse nowwith my life. I need your advise. Doctor asked me did anyting gotten worst while waiting for the test result? I reply no, infact after few day of rest while waiting for the result, I feel more fresh and only sometime, I feel my stomach like abit bloated. I hope you can advise me and address all my concern above and wish you a good day. Thank you

    1. Hello: Thank you for your message. I am sorry to hear about your hepatitis B diagnosis. Do you know if you have an acute, new HBV infection, or do you have a chronic infection? Given your symptoms, you may recently have become infected and your body is working to get rid of the virus, which is why you are having these symptoms.
      A person is considered chronically infected if they test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for more than 6 months. Talk to your doctor so he can help you determine if you are acute or chronically infected.
      If you are a healthy adult and learn you have a new, acute infection then you will likely clear it. 90% of healthy adults newly infected with HBV will clear their new HBV infection without the need for any medication. However this is not the case for chronic hepatitis B. Although there is no complete cure for chronic HBV, there are good treatments to control the virus for those that would benefit from treatment.
      While you wait, be sure you take care of your liver health by avoiding alcohol. Hepatitis B and alcohol are a dangerous combination. Take care to avoid smoking and other environmental toxins. Talk to your doctor about prescription drugs, over the counter medications and herbal remedies and supplements because some of them can harm your liver. Be sure to maintain a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and drinking plenty of good, clean water and getting regular exercise if able.
      Remember that during this time you should consider yourself infectious. HBV is not spread casually, but is is transmitted through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Be sure to keep cuts, bites, etc covered, practice safe sex using a condom since HBV is transmitted sexually, and keep personal hygiene items such as toothbrushes, razors, body jewelry or nail clippers (anything that might have trace amounts of blood on them) separate from others so they are not accidentally shared.
      Please be sure you follow up with a doctor, to confirm your HBV diagnosis and status, and whether or not you have an acute or chronic infection. If you learn you have a chronic infection, please be sure to see a liver specialist – a hepatologist or gastroenterologist or other doctor with experience treating patients with chronic HBV. Good luck.

      Hope some of this information is helpful to you.

  146. i was hbsag + for over 8 yrs . now my recent tests shows hbsag – hbsab + quant. 17.2
    u/ml and hbvdna by pcr undetectable ….what does that indicate?

    my anti-hbs is 17.2 and ive done the test in another lab and it came as follows,
    anti-hbs 64.4 u/ml . that’s confusing.

    hbsag negative

    hbdna by pcr undetectable

    i had no treatment whatsoever. my doctor said “you need no treatment since you are an inactive carrier” that was 8 years ago.
    does that mean i have recovered even i was a carrier?

    1. Hello:
      It is important to talk to your doctor about your lab results, but it appears that you have lost the hepatitis B surface antigen (the indicator of a hepatitis B infection), have undetectable viral load (HBV DNA) and developed hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-hbs). This means you have cleared the infection and are no longer infected with hepatitis B. Congratulations!
      This happens in a very small percentage of people, even without treatment.
      You report that the quantity of hepatitis B surface antibodies that you have appears to vary from lab to lab. This is not uncommon, each lab has its own standard of measurement and lab reports can vary. The important thing is you test positive for antibodies at both labs.
      Again, congratulations. Please talk to your doctor, and review all of your test results together so you get a clear picture of your liver health and hepatitis status.
      Good luck.

  147. Hi,

    When I went to donate blood last week I was told that I am infected with Hepatitis B. HBsAg count is showing as 5209 in the first test. But cut off value says 0.05. I am not sure how I have got it.

    I am scared about it. Could you please let me know how many more years I can survive with this disease considering the drugs we have available in the market. I am 33 years old now.

    Thanks.

    Ram

    1. Hello: I am sorry to hear of your hepatitis B infection. Do not be frightened, many people infected with hepatitis B live long, healthy and happy lives. The key is to be monitored regularly and see a doctor who is familiar with treating hepatitis B. The first thing you should find out is if this is a long-term or chronic infection that you have had since childhood or if it’s a new infection. If you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months, you are considered chronically infected. When you return to see your doctor, he or she may want to run more tests to determine what stage you are in the infection and to assess your liver health. For more information about your blood tests, go to http://www.hepb.org/patients/your_blood_tests.htm.
      It is very important for you to take care of your health, heat healthy food and refrain from smoking and drinking alcohol, which can hurt your liver. Also, you must be careful with blood and body fluids as they can transmit infection. Make sure you don’t share razors, for example, and bandage any cuts and bruises. Also, you must practice safe sex and use a condom to protect your partners.
      If and when you ever need treatment, there are several good drugs that can lower your viral load, and experts predict there will be a cure in the next several years. Good luck.

  148. Hi Dr.

    I have been testing for hep B 12 week (in May) after my exposure and the results for both AHBSag and HBaAB by CMIA confirmed negative.
    Is my 12 week test result post the exposure reliable. Since, after the test I was advised to be vaccined and now I am having my second shot of the Vaccine.

    Looking forward to your reply
    Thomng

    1. Hello: If I understand you correctly, you were exposed to hepatitis B. You were immediately vaccinated, and have received two of the first two hepatitis B vaccine doses. Twelve weeks after exposure to the virus, your blood test results appear to show you tested negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). It would appear that you were not infected, however please consult with your doctor. We would also recommend that one to two months after your third hepatitis B vaccine shot that you have another hepatitis B test to make sure you have generated enough antibodies (also called titers) to protect yourself from any future exposure to the virus.
      Good luck.

    2. Hello:
      It is good that you have not had any symptoms and to date have tested negative for hepatitis B. In general, it can take six to 14 weeks for a lab test to pick up the presence of the hepatitis B “core” antibody (HBcAb). This is the first antibody to appear if you are infected with hepatitis B. I would recommend you talk to your doctor and get another hepatitis B test after you complete the third hepatitis B vaccine dose to make sure you are not infected. Good luck.

  149. Hi Doctor. Could you please help interpret these results? Thank you very much.

    -AST (SGOT) 46
    -ALT (SGPT) 70

    -Hep Be Antigen: negative
    -Hep B Surf Ab Quant: <3.1
    -SBsAg Screen: Positive Abnormal
    -Hep B Core At, Tot: Positive Abnormal

    1. Hello: As your doctor has no doubt told you, you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Is this the first time you have tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg or SBsAg)? If it is, you need to be tested again in six months to see if your infection is chronic (long-term) or to see if it was an acute or short-term infection and has been cleared (which would be indicated by a positive test for the hepatitis B surface antibody (Hep B Surf Ab).
      Your ALT test (which is 70) reveals whether the infection is hurting your liver. ALT (alanine aminotransferase) is a liver enzyme that increases when liver cells are damaged or die. The average healthy ALT level for men is under 30, so there appears to be some minor liver damage occurring, which you should monitor.
      Make sure you eat healthy, refrain from drinking alcohol and smoking, and make sure you have blood tests regularly to monitor your hepatitis B and liver health. Good luck.

  150. A few months ago I was diagnosed with Chronic Hep B, and the Physician prescribed Entecavir. I’ve taken this medicine for about 9 months, and during my last lab test, my doctor reported that the Hep B was no longer detectable. However, the doctor recommended that I should continue to take Entecavir. Should I continue taking this medication?

    1. Hello: I assume that your doctor prescribed the antiviral entecavir because you were experiencing liver damage, perhaps with elevated ALT levels or high viral load? Antivirals work by meddling with the virus’ DNA and making it hard for it to replicate. The trouble is, antivirals work for only as long as you take them. When you stop taking them, the virus is free to start reproducing again and you can experience a flare in both viral load and liver damage when you stop. There is no hard and fast rule for how long you should take antivirals, but many patients take them for several years until they have achieved undetectable HBV DNA (viral load) for several years and/or experienced HBeAg seroconversion (loss of the hepatitis B “e” antigen and development of the “e” antibody.) Doctors want to see an undetectable viral load and/or HBeAg seroconversion — and even loss of the hepatitis B surface antigen — sustained for a long period of time before they take you off antivirals. Please talk to your doctor about how long he/she expects you to be on antivirals, and what results the doctor is looking for. Good luck.

  151. I went to a missionary hospital where i was diagnosed of Hepatitis B. I was given Silybon 140g (silymarin tablet) 2 tablet per day for 15 days and 1 tablet per day for 15 days. I will like to know how long i will keep taking such table and what will be the effect on the hepatitis B virus in me.
    Thanks waiting to hear from you soon.

    1. Hello: The Hepatitis B Foundation does not endorse herbal remedies that are not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration so I can’t comment on how long you should take it. Your doctor has prescribed an extract from the herb milk thistle. This herb has been used in Europe as a treatment for liver disease for centuries. Studies in laboratory animals suggest that milk thistle promotes the growth of certain types of liver cells and that it has a
      protective effect upon the liver cells. Milk thistle is generally well tolerated and has shown few side effects in clinical trials. Milk thistle can produce allergic reactions in people who are allergic to plants in the same
      family (e.g. ragweed, chrysanthemum, marigold and daisy). See more information about herbal supplements at http://www.hepb.org/powerpoints/blake.pdf
      Again, this is not a treatment, it is a herbal supplement. Good luck.

  152. Hello! I have a boyfriend who has hepatitis b. I have been vaccinated when I was child. Now I’m 24 and since I’ve been exposed against hepatitis b my doctor suggested me to repeat the vaccination. So I have already finished the 3 doses of the hepatitis b vaccine. What should I do know ? How will I know if I’m protected from now and on ? Will I always be protected even if I do unprotected intercourse ? I will be very grateful if you could answer these questions for me. Thank you!!

    1. Hello: To make sure you have enough hepatitis B antibodies (also called titers), about one or two months after the third dose you should get a blood test to make sure you have a titer count of at least 10 mIU/mL. This is considered high enough to protect you from infection if you have direct contact with infectious blood, body fluids (including semen). Good luck.

  153. Hi, I have been dignosed with acute hep.b last July 2015, and my doctor prescribed legalon 140mg 3 times a day, because I have high alt and ast results., is that okay? Also I am taking juice vitamin drinks,
    I will send my results tom so I can. Tnx

    1. Hello: Legalon is another name for milk thistle. This is an herbal supplement that is believed to protect liver cells from toxic chemicals and drugs. It also seems to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In the U.S., the FDA has not approved milk thistle as a treatment for hepatitis B because there have not been enough clinical trials to prove it is safe or effective. Also, it is hard to know the quality of the herb and its potency. If the legalon does not reduce your liver damage (evidenced by your elevated ALT levels), you may want to talk to him about getting some other type of treatment, such as an antiviral, if it is available. Good luck.

  154. hi doc i check today before 2 month my resut is this
    hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab postive
    hbsab negative
    hbsag postive
    liver biopsy normal
    no damage on the liver

    today i check and
    hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab negative
    ant hbe may not be detectable in infections caused by non hbeag producing hbv mutant
    hbsab negative
    hbsag postive
    liver biopsy normal
    no damage on the liver
    hi doc i check today before 2 month my resut is this
    hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab postive
    hbsab negative
    hbsag postive
    liver biopsy normal
    no damage on the liver

    today i check and
    hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab negative
    comment -ant hbe may not be detectable in infections caused by non hbeag producing hbv mutant
    hbsab negative
    hbsag postive
    liver biopsy normal
    no damage on the liver
    what does my result mean? is it a good sign or things are getting worse please help
    hbeab is antibody against the virus but my body stop to fight ?is it deafeted and now i am chronicaly infected?why not ant hbe not detected in comment part

    what does my result mean? is it a good sign or things are getting worse please help

    1. Determining if someone has an acute versus a chronic infection is more a function of timing. The blog editor is currently out of town and I am not familiar with all of your history, so you will want to wait until she returns next week. However, I can tell you that if you continue to test HBsAg positive for more than 6 months then it is considered a chronic infection. Ultimately if you resolve an acute infection you would be HBsAg neg, HBcAb pos, HBsAb pos, HBeAg neg, HBeAb pos and have no detectable viral load. If you continue to be HBsAg pos, HBsAb neg after 6 months then it is a chronic infection. Waiting to determine if you have an acute versus chronic infection can be very stressful. Do your best to distract yourself with other activities and do your best to take care of your general health by avoiding alcohol, smoking and other environmental toxins and take care to eat a healthy diet filled with vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fish and limited lean meats.

  155. Hi,
    My tests results showed as following :
    1.Hbv dna, qn,pcr
    Hbv 2117 iu/ml
    Hbv dna 3.33 log iu/ml
    Alt is normal (27)
    2.Hepatitis pn w/rfx,acute
    Hb s ag is reactive
    Hepatitis A AB (IGM) is non-reactive
    Hb core AB (IGM) is non-reactive
    Hepatitis C AB is non-reactive
    3. HBSAG,HBC,HBSAB,HAV
    HB S AB ,OL is non- reactive
    HB S AG is reactive
    Hepatitis A AB, total is reactive
    Hb core ab, total is reactive
    4. HBSAG,HBC,HAV-IGM,HCV
    HB S Ag is reactive
    Hepatitis AB IGM is non-reactive
    Hb core ab total is reactive
    Hepatitis C AB is non-reactive
    Other results :
    Hepatitis B panel
    Hepatitis Be antibody is reactive
    Hepatitis Be antigen is non-reactive
    May you please explain these results to me?

    1. Hello: It appears You test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), which indicates you are infected with hepatitis B. However, the good news is your liver enzymes (ALT) are normal, so the infection is not causing you any liver damage. Your viral load (HBV DNA) is moderate, which is not surprising because you are also hepatitis B “e” antigen negative (non-reactive for HBeAg). Is this the first time you have ever tested positive for hepatitis B? If so, your doctor will probably tested you again in six months to find out if this is a new infection, which you may clear in the next few weeks or months, or whether this is a chronic infection that you have had since childhood. The other good news is you do not appear to be infected with hepatitis C, which is another type of liver infection. Good luck.

      1. No, it is not the first time. I found the Hepatitis B since 2010. The DNA was about 90000 copies in my blood. However, all my liver enzymes were normal since 2010. For that reason, my doctor did not discribe me any treatment.
        I checked the DNA in December 2015 and it was undetected level , but I found that it is 2117 in July 2015. Why is that happene?
        My doctor ask me come after one year to check again. My u please give me some advices?

        1. Hello: Your viral load can shift around. The virus is kept in check by your immune system, so if you have a cold or some other illness or fatigue etc. the amount of virus can vary. The lab result gives a snapshot of your health at that point and time. Also, if you had the test run at a different lab, that could make the difference. The precision of a lab’s equipment varies between labs. That’s one reason why it’s a good idea to get your tests run at the same clinic (if it’s a reputable one) so you have consistency between your test results. Talk to your doctor, he or she may want to retest and monitor you sooner if they’re concerned. The other important piece is your ALT (liver enzymes). If you see a sudden rise in both ALTs and viral load, then you know something is going on and you should consult with your doctor. Good luck.

  156. i was hepa b infected.. and had my first sexual intercourse with my partner.. and it was no protected. does he has a possibility of having infected? how can i cure this? please help.. :(..kristine

    1. Hello: His risk of infection depends on how high your viral load is, and how much direct contact he had with your blood/body fluids/vaginal fluids. (For example, if you were menstruating his risk is higher because of direct contact with blood.) Is there any way to talk to him and ask if he has been vaccinated? Can you encourage him to go and get his first vaccine shot? Depending where you live, some county health departments in the U.S. will anonymously contact him and tell him he may have been exposed to hepatitis B and encourage him to be vaccinated or to get a dose of HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies that help fight infection after exposure.) Good luck.

    1. Hello: You won’t know if you have chronic or acute hepatitis B until you have had tests over a six-month period. When you’re a healthy adult and are infected with hepatitis B, usually your immune system fights off the infection within six months. This short-term infection is called acute hepatitis B. However, if you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months, then it is considered a long-term or chronic infection. Chronic infections often develop in people who were infected at birth or during childhood, when their young immune systems could not successfully clear the infection.
      Whether you test positive or negative for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) does not impact whether you have a chronic or acute infection.
      I hope this helps, good luck.

  157. you said only time tells wether you are acute or chronic that is ok i want to know only did you know any one who clears in acute phase? anybody any person please tell me i try to look many sites all chronic patients no acute so is this acute thing real?

    1. About 90% of healthy adults who become infected with hepatitis B experience a short-term or acute hepatitis B infection. Their immune systems are able to clear the virus (by producing antibodies and attacking infected liver cells) within weeks. Hope that was helpful.

    2. Hello: It can take several weeks or months for someone to clear an acute infection after they were infected. Yes, many people are able to clear an acute infection (up to 90% of adults), but only your lab tests will show that over time. Good luck.

  158. stef2001 may be this happen in the past i was infected and my hbsab was not strong or postive and hbsag negative this time i was exposed i tested after 40 hours and hbsag is postive and start to see syptoms after month . my last boy friend before 3 month we were together and he is negative this likely happen i am confused tell me

    1. Hello: It can take several weeks or months for hepatitis B to “incubate” in our bodies and start to show up in blood tests. Also, if you have had hepatitis B since you were a child, you may have an “inactive” infection, which means you also have low levels of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) that may not always show up in a lab test. This happens when people’s immune system are able to control the virus so there are very few virus in our blood. In addition to becoming infected through sex, people also become infected if a health worker uses a non-sterile or re-used syringe. I know this is a confusing and frightening time, but do not worry about how you got it, instead concentrate on staying as healthy as possible through a good diet, exercise, and not drinking alcohol or smoking. Many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B. Keep getting monitored and taking care of yourself. Good luck.

  159. what is your opinion?tell me please
    by meronabebe, 9 hours
    is there any possibility to test hbsag positive after two days
    1) may be have pervious infection and not strong hbsab or
    2) if large amount of blood exposed quickly detect hbsag
    i am confused help

    this not correct with my cAse because
    3)my last boyfriend we were together for 5 years and not vaccinated but negative broke up before 4 month
    4)my exposer was before two month and involve too much blood one month before two much symptoms and after that i check and become positive so what do u think or this hbcab igm not always work

    1. Hello: It takes many days or even weeks after exposure to the virus before you test positive for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). It takes that long for the virus to starting reproducing and produce enough virus to be identified by a lab test. If you now test positive for HBsAg, it may be that you were exposed weeks, months or even years earlier. Good luck.

  160. Hi, I was diagnosed with acute Hepatitis B year 2008, then after six months the doctor said that the result of my HBs Ag was negative but no antibodies yet. I was told to report every six months as follow up check up. Just this March I had a test again but the result was still the same HBs Ag negative and antibodies was non reactive. My doctor said i need to patiently wait until my antibodies become reactive and it will appear naturally. I can’t get vaccination not unless I have my antibodies become reactive. Then I let my husband to be examined also, fortunately the result was negative. In my case, does the result indicate that I am still infected or not? It’s almost seven years now but no antibodies yet. Thank you

    1. Hello:
      It appears that you have “inactive” hepatitis B. Your body’s immune system has not yet totally gotten rid of the virus. It hasn’t generated enough hepatitis B surface antibodies to clear the virus from your liver. As a result, you have to assume that you are still infected and have a chronic infection. Have you had your ALT (alanine aminotransferase) levels tested, or your viral load (HBV DNA) tested? You want to make sure that even though you test negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen, that you don’t have a mutated form of the virus (called “occult” hepatitis B). With an occult infection, your hepatitis B surface antigen has a minor mutation so most labs can’t pick it up. Just to make sure, you may want to talk to your doctor about this and get your ALT levels tested to make sure the infection is inactive. If your ALT levels are fine, then the only thing you can do, as your doctor advised, is to eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and try to be patient.
      Last thought, if/when you ever have children, make sure they are immunized within 12 hours of birth and received a dose of HBIG to protect them from infection. Good luck.

    1. Hello:
      If your mother has hepatitis B (and tests positive for HBsAg), it’s very important that you and your siblings are tested for hepatitis B also. Most people become infected at birth if their mother has hepatitis B because the virus is present in her blood and body fluids. All members of your family should be screened for hepatitis B and immediately immunized if they have not been infected. To break this cycle of infection, it is very important that babies born to infected mothers are vaccinated with the first vaccine dose within 12 hours of birth, and given a dose of HBIG. Good luck.

  161. I am Mahmodul hassan age 30.iam hbsag positive from 31 Aug .my ALT is 24 and
    HBeAg is negative. Doctor don’t prescribe any medicine.But I am not satisfied and the doctor was tell me no restreacktion for food and life style.
    Now what can I do?

    1. Hello: When you’re first diagnosed with hepatitis B it is common to want a treatment to get rid of the infection. However, keep in mind that many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B and never requirement treatment. Generally, treatment is recommended if the virus is harming your liver and if you have a high viral load. Your ALT level is normal and your HBeAg is negative, which probably means your viral load is not high. We recommend you keep getting monitored, and eat healthy foods and refrain from alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  162. pls help me to know that if Im acute ot chronic I believe i was infected with in two months..
    my liver is in good condition..no any problem or damage..im positive in hepa b…did i have the chance to be hapatitis free…I wass free of this disease before cauz I go abroad..Im 25 yrs old

    A-HBs 110.0 c.o.v negative <2.00 IU/L
    A-HBe 1.010 c.o.v positive 0.005
    HBeAg 1.0 c.o.v negative 0.127
    A-HBc total 1.0 c.o.v positive 0.009
    A-HAV IGM 1.0 c.o.v negative 0.350
    HBVsAg 1.0 c.o.v positive 17.450

    my doctor give me an Entecavir entegard for 3month..it is safe for me with this medicine…pls help me…thank you…

    1. Hello: It is hard for me to say. It appears you have tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). You say that your doctor gave you the antiviral entecavir for three months. An antiviral only works for as long as you take it. What I cannot tell from your test results is whether you have an acute (short-lived) infection or a long-term chronic infection. You can only determine that if you have been tested for HBsAg over a six-month period. Any hepatitis B infection that lasts longer than six months is chronic. If this is an acute infection, it can take several weeks or months before your body clears the infection and you produce the hepatitis B surface antibody. I recommend you continue to see your doctor and get monitored every few weeks or months to track the course of your infection. Good luck.

  163. Hi, My friend had got tested hepatitis b recently and found that he is hbsag +ve, then conulted doctor,on suggestion of doctor got tested for hbeag ,lft and DNA quantitative viral count. below are the test results.
    hepatits e antigen(Hbeag) SERUM – 0.37
    Hepatits B viral(HBV DNA) Quantitative real time PCR 70 IU/ml
    Liver Panel 1 LFT SERUM
    AST(SGOT) 19 U/L
    ALT(SGPT) 39 U/L
    GGTP 41 U/L
    Alkaline Phosphatase(ALP) 131 U/L
    Bilirubin total 0.40 mg/dl
    Bilirubin direct 0.09
    biliburin indirect 0.31
    total protein 7.50
    albumin 4.40
    A:G Ratio 1.42

    Can you please tell me whether he needs to go for further test and what is state of his helath condition and is there any life threat? Thanks

    1. Hello: If I understand the report, he is infected with hepatitis B. His viral load is not high, and his ALT (SGPT) is normal, so it appears the infection is not harming his life. ALT (alanine aminotransferase) measures an enzyme that liver cells release when they are damaged. When it goes above normal (which is about 30 for men) it means there is liver damage occurring. I don’t see the the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) on the test results you provided, but I assume he is positive because he has detectable HBV DNA. If this is the first time he has tested positive for HBsAg (which indicates a hepatitis B infection), he will have to be tested again in six months to find out if this is a new (acute) infection or if he has a chronic infection. He also needs to be monitored regularly to track his infection and make sure it is not harming his life. Good luck.

      1. Hi, Thanks for the info.sorry for not making clear, he is HBsag positive and this is the first time tested.
        So right now he has no problem with liver right? or does he need to undergo any liver tests?

        1. Hello: It does not appear from the lab tests that he is experiencing liver damage. However, only his doctor who has conducted a physical examination of him can truly assess his health. He should undergo testing, to see what’s happening with the infection, in another few months, and definitely in six months to determine if this is a new or acute infection, or whether he was infected during childhood and this is a chronic infection. Good luck.

  164. Hallo Dr.
    These were the initial results of my Liver Function tests before going for Hepatitis tests.
    ALT -1000
    AST- 316
    GGT-1200
    DIRECT BILIRUBIN -4.0
    ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE -638
    TOTAL BILIRUBIN-10

    The following were the results for Hepatitis tests;
    Hep ‘A’ IgG Ab -POSITIVE
    Hep ‘B’ Surface Ag (HBsAg)-POSITIVE
    HBSAG VALUE -682.00 IU /ML

    I further went through the following tests;
    AFP TUMOUR, HEP. ‘B’ CORE M, HEP. ‘B’ e Ag, HEP. ‘B’ e Ab, PCR HBV VL.
    The following were the results;
    HEP’B’ CORE IgM (HBcIgM )-POSITIVE
    HEP’B’ e ANTIGEN (HBeAg)-POSITIVE
    HEP’B’ e ANTIBODY (HBeAb )-NEGATIVE

    S-a1 FETOPROTEIN -4.3 KU /1
    Hepatitis B Virus DNA -101303817 IU/mL

    HBV-1 LOG UNITS – 8.006

    MY DOCTOR PUT ME ON TENOFOVIR TABLETS AND SIMEPAR CAPSULES. IT HAS BEEN ONE MONTH NOW WITH SLIGHT IMPROVEMENT WITH SOME SLIGHT PAIN ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF THE CHEST THAT AT TIMES EXTENDS TO THE RIGHT ARM.

    PLEASE GIVE ME YOUR CANDID OPINION ON THE SAME AND IF I’LL EVER BE WHOLE AGAIN. THANK YOU.

    1. Hello: Your doctor put you on the powerful antiviral tenofovir (brand name Viread), which is one of the top two antivirals recommended to treat hepatitis B. Your viral load is very high and the infection is harming your liver, as shown by the high ALT and AST tests. He also provided a milk thistle compound, an herbal supplement that may help the liver. Your doctor is following medical guidelines to control your hepatitis B infection, and your viral load (and ALT levels) will hopefully decline as the tenofovir stops the virus from replicating in your liver. It is important to take the antiviral regularly, and also eat healthy food and do not drink alcohol or smoke. See your doctor regularly for monitoring so your infection can be cared for. Because you are receiving good medical care, I believe you will be whole again. Good luck.

  165. she is on menstration and prostitute and i found too much blood on mucus memebrane is that the incident after 40 hours exposer i go check and found hbsag postive i just want to figure out this queations that day infected or before i have one girl friend for 5 year i didnot tell her if that incident she is free if before she have it and all my family negative help me please
    my result was hbeag negative hbeab postive hbcab postive
    1)when we infected hbeag is postive this to change negative naturaly how long does it needs?
    2)if too much blood exposed hbsag test postive after how long?
    3)after infected how long does it needs to fill syptomes and how long stay?
    4)i fill syptom after 1 month of exposer before that no have? please answer 4 questions

    1. Hello:
      When you are newly infected with hepatitis B, it can take several weeks or months for a lab test to identify the virus. It often takes weeks for the virus to reproduce enough to be identified in a lab test. If you had a lab test 40 hours after your possible exposure and it showed you were positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and for the hepatitis B “e” antibody (HBeAb), it means you were probably infected several months or even years earlier. It can take months to lose the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) and develop “e” antibodies. Most people who get hepatitis B NEVER develop any symptoms when they’re first infected, so it’s hard to use symptoms as an indicator of judging when you first became infected. Symptoms, when they do develop, can happen a few weeks after infection.
      It’s important that you continue to have your hepatitis B monitored, and also have your liver health monitored through by ALT or SPGT test, which looks at liver enzymes in your blood. If they are high or above average, it means the infection is hurting your liver. Remember to eat healthy foods, do no drink alcohol or smoke, and use safe sex (condom) so you do not infect anyone else. Good luck.

  166. 1)acute thing is a lie because me adult and 24 but now chronic i know a lot so this thing is lie?some lucky ones change

    1. Hello:
      If you were infected when you were a baby or a young child, your immune system does not fight the infection and you develop chronic or long-term hepatitis B. When you are infected as an adult, if your are healthy your mature immune system recognizes the infection and is able to cure it within a few weeks or months. That is called an acute infection. I hope this helps. Good luck.

  167. hi i found out i am hbsag postive i check after one dentist incdent that worry me before i use to be strong and work hard inside i fill no pain or no problem but after i found hbsag + 1 month starting i fill pain in liver area,so this means
    1)that incident i was exposed and become postive because before i have no pain and strong ,every year i check std and free?
    2)how long pain stay doctor say no medication now?
    tell me in deital i go that dentist and tell him not to infect others if that is the case because other peolple must be kept safe

    1. Hello: I am sorry to hear you are experiencing pain that may be from hepatitis B. When you are newly infected with hepatitis B, it can take several weeks or months for a lab test to identify the virus. Are you certain that you did not have hepatitis B before you saw this dentist? If that was your first positive test, it is important that you are tested again in six months to determine if you cleared the infection. If you have hepatitis B for six months or longer, it may mean that you were infected when you were a baby or child and you have a long-term or chronic infection. If you have a chronic infection, you should be monitored regularly. Most people who get hepatitis B do not develop any symptoms when they’re first infected, but some do. For more information about hepatitis B symptoms go to http://www.hepb.org/hepb/symptoms.htm
      Sometimes abdominal pain may not result from hepatitis B, for more information on that go to http://hepbblog.org/2015/09/14/when-is-that-pain-hep-b-related-and-when-is-it-something-else/
      It’s important that you continue to have your hepatitis B monitored, and also have your liver health monitored through by ALT or SPGT test, which looks at liver enzymes in your blood. If they are high or above average, it means the infection is hurting your liver. Remember to eat healthy foods, do no drink alcohol or smoke, and use safe sex (condom) so you do not infect anyone else.
      If you are certain that you became infected with hepatitis B after your visit to the dentist, you should talk to him about it. Clearly the dentist is not following medical guidelines if he is infecting his patients by re-using or failing to sterilize office equipment.
      Good luck.

  168. is there a thing called again infected?
    i was hbsag postive before 5 years and my result was
    hbsag,hbcab,hbeab postive
    hbeag,hbsab negative
    then after 7 month my immunity control and hbsag was cleard becomes negative but hbsab was still negative i check every year but negative,last week i was exposed to some blood during sex and i check after 3 days hbsag turn again to postive i am too much confused why it changes?i wait it turn back to negative still hbsab was negative? help me what can i do

    1. Hello:
      When a lab measures the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in your blood test, it measures down to a certain level. If your HBsAg level is so low it falls beneath that measurement, a test will show that you have undetectable HBsAg, even though there may be a very few particles. Even though your HBsAg has seemed to disappear, you don’t have enough surface antibodies (HBsAb) to be detectable by the lab test (which measures down to a certain level for antibodies also.) As a result, you’ve been undetectable for both the surface antigen and antibody. Now if you have a blood test when you’re sick and your immune system is suppressed, your surface antigen level might creep up a little bit over the threshold and you would then test positive again for HBsAg. Then the next time you have a blood test, it might be back below the “detectable” threshold. Unfortunately, until you have detectable surface antibodies, you still have “inactive” hepatitis B. So eat well, refrain from smoking and drinking, and keep getting monitored. Remember, you are very lucky to have inactive hepatitis B. Good luck.

  169. hi, i’m 4 months old pregnant now. i was teted positif with hbsag when the preganancy was 3 months. i can’t remember when i got the virus. my husband took a test too but he was clean.i don’t drink alcohol, i don’t use drugs, i didn’t donate my blood, i didn’t get any accidents and i only have sex with my husband. can i get the virus from my mother? and what whould happen if the virus doesn’t go away in before i give birth? my doctor told me that i’m a carrier. can it get worse?thanks. i really am confused .

    1. Hello: I’m sorry to hear about your hepatitis B infection. Many people with chronic hepatitis B became infected at birth or during early childhood from their infected mothers. It is important that you are tested again in a few weeks or months to find out if you are indeed chronically infected and to monitor your health, especially during your pregnancy. We recommend you find a doctor who is knowledgeable about treating hepatitis B, who will test you to find out what stage of infection you are at, and also perform a liver test to determine if the infection is harming your liver. That is a blood test that looks at ALT (alanine aminotransferase) or SGPT levels. These liver enzymes rise above normal (which is 19 in women) when liver cells are damaged. The other important thing for your doctor to do is to perform a viral load (HBV DNA) test.
      When infected women give birth, often their babies are infected because of their exposure to infectious blood and body fluids during delivery. To prevent mother-to-child infection, doctors immediately administer the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine and administer HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies.) However, in a small percentage of women who have very high viral loads, the vaccine plus HBIG isn’t enough to prevent infection in their babies. When your viral load is high, doctors often administer antivirals (such as tenofovir – Viread) during the last trimester of pregnancy to lower viral load and prevent infection to your baby. For more information about this viral load testing in pregnant women, please see http://hepbblog.org/2015/06/25/expert-calls-for-viral-load-testing-in-all-pregnant-women-with-hepatitis-b/
      For more information for pregnant women with hepatitis B, please visit http://www.hepb.org/pdf/pregnancy.pdf
      So good luck, please see a doctor who is knowledgeable about hepatitis B and get yourself tested for hepatitis B, liver damage (ALT) and viral load.
      Last piece of advice, please have your husband and other family members screened and immunized against hepatitis B if necessary. Good luck.

  170. i have tested HBsAg +ve and my viral load is 4490 IU/ml. I am infected it is for sure. But do you think I am contagious. How does one determine that.

    1. Hello: Everyone who tests positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has the virus in their blood and body fluids (semen) and is contagious. Your viral load (at 4,490 IU/mL) is moderate, however even if it was low you are still capable of infecting others. It is imperative that you make sure your family members and household members are screened for hepatitis B and immunized if needed. Also, make sure you practice safe sex, bandage any cuts or bruises, and do not share razors or nail clippers. The hepatitis B virus can live on dried surfaces for several days, caution is always important.
      Also, make sure you are monitored regularly (including your antigens, antivirals and ALT or liver enzymes to make sure the virus is not harming your liver). Eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and smoking, which can worsen hepatitis B. Good luck.

  171. thank you for the reply.do you mean that i might have been carrying this virus since i was a baby?but why doesn’t my husband get infected?and my dad is also clean. i’m sorry because i’m still thinking about the possibilities of how i could get infected.
    i also took a blood test checking sgpt and sgot level. the result was my sgot level was 20 and sgpt level 19. what does it mean? my doctor only told me that my liver functions well and i’m a carrier. and my doctor is an internist.it is hard to find a liver specialist here.thank you again and again

    1. Hello: Great questions! Yes, you may have been infected since infancy or childhood. And, it is not uncommon for men NOT to get infected from female partners who have hepatitis B. The virus is transmitted through blood and body fluids (semen). Women have far greater exposure to male body fluids (semen) than men have to female body fluids (in this case vaginal fluids). Also, if your or your mom’s viral load was/is moderate or low, the risk to the male partner is further reduced. None-the-less, it’s always important for all partners to be immunized.
      I am glad to hear your ALT/SGPT levels are within normal range. These are enzymes that liver cells release into the bloodstream when they are injured by infection. For women, a healthy ALT level is 19 or under. Even if you are a little over 19, there are variations between labs so being a bit high is not dangerous.
      You need your doctor to conduct a viral load test (HBV DNA) to check your viral load, and you need to monitor your ALT regularly too. In addition to making sure your baby is immediately immunized and given HBIG, you need to continue to have your hepatitis B monitored, especially after delivery.
      One more note, it is safe to breastfeed with hepatitis B. Don’t be afraid to post more questions as they arise. Good luck.

  172. hi sir
    Iam having Hepatitis B since one year i made all tests related to Hep B all are normal today i done my liver function test and the results are

    Test Value Reference range

    S. Bilirubin (T) : 0.6 [ 0.2 – 1.0 mg/dl ]

    S. Bilirubin (D) : 0.1 [ 0.0 – 0.3 mg/dl ]

    S. Bilirubin (Ind) : 0.5

    S.G.O.T. : 36.0 [ 5 – 40 IU/L ]

    S.G.P T. : 45.0 [ 5 – 40 IU/L ]

    Alk.Phosphatase : 90.0 [ 25 – 100 IU/ml ]

    Proteins Total : 7.2 [ 6.0 – 8.0 gm/dl ]

    S. Albumin : 4.3 [ 3.8 – 5.0 gm/dl ]

    S. Globulin : 2.9 [ 2.3 – 3.5 gm/dl ]

    A : G Ratio : 1.4:1 [ 1.2 – 3.5 gm/dl ]
    as per report all are normal i think except SGPT whether SGPT levels increased means the liver has started damage. plz suggest me how to reduce SGPT levels
    Thanks in advance

    1. Hello: Your SGPT levels are not dramatically elevated, and all other results as you noted are normal. You should discuss with your doctor how often you are monitored for SGPT (similar to ALT tests.) Do you have them monitored every six or 12 months? Also, you didn’t mention your viral load. That level will also help your doctor determine how frequently you should be monitored. Good luck.

  173. wow thanks a lot i’m relieved now.at least one big question has its answer. another question, i’m really curious about this. if i might have been carrying this virus since i was a baby, is there any possibilities that my brothers are infected too?
    my mother was diagnozed with fatty acid 3 years ago but she is fine now, did it have anything to do with the virus in her body. honestly, we haven’t done any test about hepatitis to her. do we have to do it?is there any possibilities that there still any virus in her body? i live with my father and mother.
    one more thing, is there any possibilities that i will be carrying this virus for the rest of my life?thank you so very much.
    i am glad i finally found this website 🙂

    1. Hello: The majority of people living with chronic hepatitis B were infected at birth or early childhood. Unless you were exposed by an unsafe or re-used syringe etc. at birth or during childhood, there is a possibility that your mother and siblings are infected. In fact, medical guidelines recommend that when you learn you have hepatitis B, that all of your family and household members should be screened for the infection, and vaccinated if they are found not to be infected. In some families if the mother was infected, sometimes not all siblings are infected. It will depend on how much virus (HBV DNA) the mother had in her body during each pregnancy. So yes, get everyone screened and immunized if needed.
      Now to your other question, experts predict they will have a “cure” for hepatitis B within the next few years. In the past year they’ve developed a cure (using a combination of antivirals) for hepatitis C, and we hope a cure will be developed soon for hepatitis B. Meanwhile, there are effective treatments for hepatitis B to keep your viral load down if you have liver damage, so there are good treatment options available if you ever need them. Good luck.

  174. Hi..my husband is a inactive hbv carrier.our friends advise him to take the hepatitis A vaccine to prevent a futur infection by this virus.i want to know if is this vaccine is safe for him or can harm his liver plz help..

    1. Hello: Great question, he should absolutely be immunized against hepatitis A. In fact, that is one of the recommendations for all people living with hepatitis B (active or inactive), the last thing you want is another liver infection on top of hepatitis B. Thank you.

    1. Hello: It is impossible to say how long someone will remain infected with hepatitis B. If you are infected when you’re a baby or child, the infection can last up to a lifetime. If you’re infected when you’re a healthy adult, it can last only a few weeks or months. If you were infected as a child and have a chronic infection, there is a small percentage of people who do clear the infection and develop the hepatitis B surface antibody after several years. There is always hope. Good luck.

  175. Me and my husband’s HBsAg test is positive and My hbeag test is positive with units of 1364 so can i expect that my viral load will be undetectable n can i expect that i will get rid from this .plzz reply

    1. Hello: You write that both you and your husband are infected with hepatitis B, as indicated by your positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) test results. To assess your hepatitis B infection, doctors look at your viral load (HBV DNA), which indicates how much virus you have in your body. When you test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg), it usually means that you are in the stage where you have a high viral load. Your immune system hasn’t noticed or started fighting the infection yet. This is called the immune-tolerant stage, because your immune system is “tolerating” the virus. Because the immune system isn’t attacking your infected liver cells yet, your LFT or liver function tests are normal. Ironically, when your immune system starts attacking the infection is when you have signs of liver damage as your immune system attacks the infected liver cells.
      It is important that both you and your husband are monitored regularly by your doctor, and that you eat healthy food and do not drink alcohol or smoke.
      Also, if and when you have children, it’s very important to make sure they are immediately immunized with the first hepatitis B vaccine dose within 12 hours of birth and given HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies.) If your viral load is high, your doctor may want to treat you with antivirals during your pregnancy to reduce the risk that your baby will be infected.
      Good luck.

  176. hello,
    i have been tested hbsag positive in january 15. when i donated blood in december 13 , my hbsag was negative in test. now my doctor is telling me that i have chronic infection not 9 months old but i it may be very old infection , may be from child hood just because my fibroscan result is 10 kpa. he said such high result can be noticed only after inflammation for long period only . i am surprised . how come i was hbsag negative in 2013 then? is it possible that chronic hepatitis B becomes negative and again after sometime positive? your opinion is valuable for me? my viral load is high and alt is elevated so i have already started treatment ..taking viread everynight.

    1. Hello: I’m sorry but I can’t explain it. Perhaps the test was faulty when you donated blood in December. I am happy to hear your doctor is monitoring your liver health carefully and has started you on tenofovir (Viread). Tenofovir is one of the top two antivirals recommended for hepatitis B. Make sure you keep taking tenofovir and get monitored regularly, I hope your viral load and ALT levels drop quickly. Good luck.

  177. thank you for your kind reply. i just wanted to make a clear view…is it right if person has fibroscan 10 kpa then his infection is old?
    similarly, i wanted to know about seroconversion of hbeag positive to negative and hbeab positive and to go in inactive carrier phase. this process happens by immune system by its own without medication or it can be achieved by medication too?
    thank you.

    1. Hi: I’m sorry if I didn’t answer that part of your question. The degree of liver damage we have may not reflect how long we’ve been infected with hepatitis B. For example, there are young children and newly-infected adults who may have significant liver damage. It depends on genetics, our immune system, general health and lots of other factors. You can’t figure the “age” of your infection based on your liver health.
      Now to your other question, people lose HBeAg and develop “e” antibodies, and can still have active hepatitis B. There is a type of hepatitis B infection called “HBeAg-negative hepatitis B.” Often, people who have been infected a long time and whose virus have developed mutations have a fairly high viral load and signs of liver damage without being HBeAg-positive. Inactive hepatitis B is defined as having no liver damage and very low viral replication going on.
      I hope this helps, I realize hepatitis B is very complicated. Good luck.

  178. thank you for your kind reply. your explaination is excellent and very helpful for me.
    just one question….
    serconversion with undetectable viral load and not elevated ALT is something what all chronic hepatitis B patient would like to reach there including me.
    now i think, due to high viral load and high ALT result, i am in immune clearance phase. i am taking tenofovir. so can i reach to inactive phase by this medication or it is the phase only for some lucky people who reach there by their own immune system without medication naturally?sorry for my poor english but i hope my question is clear to you,
    thank you

    1. Hello: Researchers are working hard to answer the very questions you asked. In some people, the immune clearance phase (with elevated ALT) ends with total clearing of the virus and developing surface antibodies. In others who have inactive hepatitis B (normal ALT and low viral load), they go for years without clearing the infection even though their viral load is very low.
      The antiviral tenofovir should quickly lower your viral load and reduce your ALT levels to normal. You may have to take it for several years, and in a small percentage of people, tenofovir actually reduces the viral load so much they are able to get rid of the infection.
      We continue to hope that a cure will be developed in the next few years. Good luck.

  179. The first time I tested positive was in December 2012. In June 2014 I underwent a viral load test which gave 800 HBV DNA IU/ml result. A surface antigen spot test in November 2015 came up positive (which would indicate a chronic status). However earlier in March 2015 my AST & ALT were 19.8 and 18 respectively. Do I need any treatment given that the virus has not cleared on its own?

    1. Hello: You do not need treatment because your viral load is low and your ALT levels show no signs of liver damage. You are lucky to appear to have “inactive” hepatitis B. When you have chronic hepatitis B, the virus generally never goes away on its own, and there is no cure for hepatitis B yet. The best thing to hope for, which you appear to have, is inactive hepatitis B.
      Keep getting monitored and seeing your doctor, and eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. We hope a cure will finally be developed in the next few years. Good luck.

  180. Hello
    I was diagnosed with Hep B in July 2014, I recovered and HBsAg was negative in Nov 2014, enzimes and liver funtion are fine, I feel great, HBeAg negative since sep 2014, HBeAb positive in sep 2014, virus load <20 since oct 2014 but the HBsAb is still unreactive and I am very concerned.
    Does that means that I have a cronic disease?
    Can I still be contagious?
    Why is still unreactive?
    Can I get sick again?
    My doctor wants to wait anoter 3 months to test again without telling me what is happening and how this could affect my life.
    I will very much appreciate your advice.
    inm

    1. Hello: Was July 2014 the first time you were ever tested for hepatitis B? Is it possible that you were chronically-infected before that diagnosis and just never knew it? When babies are born to mothers infected with hepatitis B, they often become infected due to exposure to infectious blood and body fluids during delivery. Their immature immune systems don’t know to fight the infection and they develop a long-term or chronic infection. Has your mother or any of your siblings tested positive for hepatitis B?
      In contrast, when healthy adults are infected, their immune systems usually clear the acute or short-term infection over several weeks or months. It could be that you are simply taking longer than normal to clear an acute infection.
      The good news is you have inactive hepatitis B, your body has pretty much cleared the virus, but it lacks the horsepower for the final push to produce hepatitis B surface antibodies. The tests that your doctor will run in three months make sense because he/she wants to continue to monitor you to see what course the infection will take, and if you will develop surface antibodies.
      While your viral load is undetectable, until you generate surface antibodies, you may want to make sure you practice universal precautions and practice safe sex. Also, eat healthy food and avoid alcohol and cigarettes, which as you know weaken the immune system. Good luck.

  181. Hi,

    Please help. My HBsAg result is reactive and I have a 59 U/L SGPT, SGOT Normal, what does this mean?

    1. Hello: Your hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive test shows you are infected with hepatitis B. Is this the first time you’ve ever been tested for hepatitis B? Or, have you tested positive for the infection for longer than six months and are sure you have a chronic infection? If you have a chronic infection, you have a moderately elevated liver enzyme level, which shows minimal liver damage. Usually, once a doctor determines you have a chronic infection, they monitor a patient’s viral load and SGPT level. If your viral load is high and you have liver damage, indicated by an above-normal SGPT level, then treatment is recommended. I don’t know your viral load, but your SGPT level is not very high. We recommend you continue to be monitored, and remember to eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

    1. Hello: There are different strains or genotypes of hepatitis B, so you risk sharing different strains of hepatitis B, which may have some impact on your health. Some genotypes carry a higher risk of liver cancer than others. However, there has not been much research into this. Also, you and your partner could also carry other sexually transmitted infections than hepatitis B, so before you have unprotected sex, you may want to make sure neither of you have an STI. Good luck.

  182. Hello, pls i was diagnosed with Hep b. My first DNA result was
    10,819 cps/ml
    1,859 IU/ml
    4.03Log .
    The doctor placed me on tenovofir 300mg and i have been using it for 7 months now but i still have symptoms like dizziness, headaches, nausea and sometime loss of weight and appetitie. Recent scan on my liver shows i have mild hepatomegally with my liver slightly enlarged (16.2cm) but normal parechymal echo pattern seen and no abscess or biliary channel dilation. I am currently on tenovofir and lamivuldine combination with 300mg each but i still feel the same symptoms even stronger. Please i need your opinion about this. Thanks.

    1. Hello: I’d like to clarify, are you on both tenofovir and lamivudine? Under U.S. practice guidelines, only tenofovir at 300 mg daily is recommended. You should not need a second antiviral. Also, among antivirals, lamivudine is considered the least effective and is no longer recommended because it can cause drug resistance. If you are taking both antivirals simultaneously, that may be causing some side effects. Please talk to your doctor as soon as you can about discontinuing the lamivudine.
      Usually, hepatitis B does not cause the other symptoms you described, so be sure you discuss the symptoms with your doctor also, as they may be related to another medical condition. Good luck.

  183. thanks. pls this is my hep b profile test results

    HBSAg Reactive
    HBSAb Not Reactive
    HBeAg Not Reactive
    HBeAb Not Reactive
    HBcAb Not Reactive

    The result of the LFT i had on 18/08/15 was
    result range
    S- Billirubin (total) 9.0 umol/l 0-18.8
    S-ALK PHOSPHATE 209.20 ul 25- 147
    S- Total protein 82.0 g/l 60-86
    S- Albumin 46.38g/l 38-44
    S-g GGT 31.0 ul 11-43
    S- AST 65.0 ul 0-40
    S-ALT 76.0 ul 0-40

    After some medication, i went for LFT on 11/11/15 and below is the result
    result range
    S- Billirubin (total) 8.14 umol/l 0-18.8
    S-ALK PHOSPHATE 158.27 ul 25- 147
    S- Total protein 64.32 g/l 60-86
    S- Albumin 40.77g/l 38-44
    S-g GGT 20.0 ul 11-43
    S- AST 67.0 ul 0-40
    S-ALT 39.0 ul 0-40

    looking at the profile and the recent LFT as against the prevoius one, can you tell me whether i am chronic or acute? can you please explain my condition and advice me accordingly ? PLEASE tell me all i need to know per the report. thanks

    1. Hello: Your recent tests show your ALT levels are decreasing, which is good news because it shows your liver damage is declining. When liver cells are damaged, they release the enzyme ALT into the bloodstream. For men, an ALT level of 30 or less, or for women 19 and less, is healthy. Lab test results vary so your lab identifies up to a 40 range as healthy, so your ALT test looks good. I cannot tell if you have chronic or acute hepatitis B from your two tests because they are about three months apart. If you continue to test positive for HBsAg for six months or longer, than you are considered to have a chronic or long-term infection. Good luck.

  184. Hello
    My doctor said I’m a hepatitis b carrier. I’m 28 years old male. My doc said I’m a hepatitis b carrier but my liver is not infected, and I should come back for a test after 3 months and to stop alcohol and do protected sex and do my every day routine. I have gasteropathy he gave me a medicine for that. Is it serious.

    1. Hello: I cannot answer if it’s serious. Is this a new infection, or is this the first time you have ever tested positive for hepatitis B? When a healthy adult is infected, it can take up to six months for his immune system to eradicate the virus. It is good that your doctor is having you return for another test in three months, it means he is monitoring you carefully. You absolutely should stop alcohol, cigarette smoking, and start eating healthy foods. Also, we agree that you must practice safe sex because your blood and body fluids (including semen) carry the virus. Good luck.

  185. Hi,

    I am 36 years old iam having Hbv with Hbsag and Hbeag positive and my liver is coarse echo texture . what is my condition .please tell me what should i do if any issues.

    1. Hello: It sounds like you have active hepatitis B, and probably have a high viral load if you are HBeAg-positive. Have your had your liver enzymes (such as ALT or SGPT) tested? When liver cells are damaged, they release the enzymes ALT or SGPT into the blood. A blood test will reveal if the enzymes are above normal, which indicates liver damage. Please talk to your doctor to find out if you should have these tests, and whether you require treatment. If you live outside the U.S., you may want to review the World Health Organization’s hepatitis B treatment guidelines to see if you need treatment. They are found at http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/ Good luck.

        1. Hello: In general, a healthy ALT/SGPT level is under 19 for women and under 30 for men. But every lab has a different “normal” range, which can reach up to 50. If the lab says your levels are normal, then it’s probably safe to believe them. We recommend you get tested AT THE SAME LAB every time you are monitored. That way, if your ALT/SGPT levels change, it’s not because of different laboratory equipment or testing methods, it’s because your liver enzymes have actually fluctuated. Good luck.

          1. Thank u doctor for your sugesstion . I want to Know One thinging My wife is Vaccinated But my wife is having severe Urine infection problem when i have a sex with her . do you think that can i have physical relation ship with her further or to discontinue to keep her healthy life . I am Thinking to give divorce to her to have a good life so as a doctor please suggest me the good advice .

          2. Hello: I would go with your wife and speak to a doctor about this, it does not sound like it is related to hepatitis B. Good luck.

    2. Hello: It is important to have a viral load (HBV DNA) test and a liver function test (called ALT or SGPT). Treatment is recommended if your viral load is high and you have signs of liver damage. Review your results with your doctor and discuss if treatment is recommended. If you live outside of the U.S., the World Health Organization has published treatment guidelines at http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/. Good luck.

  186. My Aunt had Ultrasound Abdomen early February 2015. Result showed Hepatic was normal. Also no sonographic evidence of infiltration. No liver masses are seen. Gallbladder 3 mm polyp. No glallstones are seen. No dilatation of biliary. Then early November 2015, she had physical checkup and blood test results shows as follow
    Hapatatis B Surf Ag Positive
    Hapatatis B Surf Ab QI Negative
    Hapatatis B Core Ab QI Positive
    Hapatatis C Ab Negative

    She was very health and no prior issues. No pain abdomen area, no dark urine, no fever, no loss of appetite, no nausea or vomiting, no yellowing of skin or whites of eyes. Within Novermber 2015, immediately, she did blood panel test. Here is results as well:

    HBV DNA, QN, PCR 912 H
    HBV DNA, QN, PCR 2.96 H

    Any suggestions, is this could be a false positive?. please help.

    1. Hello: It appears your aunt has chronic hepatitis B. What is missing are liver enzyme test results, which show if the infection is harming her liver. When the liver is damaged, it releases the enzymes ALT or SGPT into the blood. A blood test shows if these liver enzymes are above normal. Normal for women is 19 or less. Keep in mind that many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B, and never show any of the symptoms that you mentioned. Unless there are signs of liver damage, she may be fine and not require any treatment. Good luck.

  187. In october i tested positive(for abnormal but negative for range) for hep b surf antigen. Also, there is a result that says Hep BSAG confirmation negative (neutral for unit and negative for range). A month later i retested and also did the hep b surf antibody test. The hep b surf antigen says non-reactive/negative for range and the hep b surf antibody says <5 im guessing its saying its nonreactive because its less than 8. It has note under it that says "A result greater or equal to 12 mIU/ml (WHO 1st IRP 26-1-77) indicates that antibodies to HBsAG are present and it usually indicates protection against infection." (I receieved all hep b shot as an infant). I am confused all the way around was i ever infected was the first test a false postive. And is it non reactive a month later because i do not have it any more or never had it? If i recovered from it(acute) does that mean i am a carrier? I just want to know if i chose to have unprotected sex will i be putting that person at risk for hep b? Both doctors said my liver functions were fine

    1. Hello: Your results suggest you have “inactive” hepatitis B. The virus is not replicating much at all in your liver, indicated by your normal liver function test and the fact you now have undetectable hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). However, until you generate more hepatitis B surface antibodies you have not totally cleared the infection. You can still infect others, but the risk if much lower than if your had a high viral load with lots of virus in your blood, body fluids and semen. Keep eating healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and keep getting monitored to safeguard your health. Good luck.

  188. Good day Sir
    My hepa story is. I had acute infection hbsag in 2007. I have test after 5 months. I got result as follows.

    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab .5 mIU/ml
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab positive

    LFT is normal

    Recently Dec. 2015 Hbsab checked again and value is given below.

    Hbsab 3.6 mIU/ml
    LFT is normal…

    Please advise me. Am i infection free??
    I havnt take a single medicine till now.
    Can i infect to other?

    Thanks

    1. Hello: I answered most of your questions below, yes you may still infect others so safe sex practices are necessary, and because you have no signs of liver damage, you may not need treatment, but only your doctor knows for sure. Good luck.

      1. Thank u sir
        But my doctor told me that you are no longer infectious more than 6 months from time of acute infectfion, as hbsag shows negative 3 time repeated test from various lab.

        But can’t understand hbsab also show negative as < 10 miu/ml.

        Hbsab shows as 3.6 miu/ml

        Is this possible that

        Hbsag and hbsab both are negative. While i have faced hbv infection…

  189. Hello.
    physical check-up on early November 2015.

    This is the first time on this result no prior issues.
    HBsag positive
    HBsab Q1 negative
    HB core Q1 positive
    HB C ab negative
    HBV DNA QN PCR 912 h
    HBV DNA QN PCR 2.96 H
    AST (SGOT) 17
    ALT (SGPT) 19

    Any suggestions. Please help

    1. Hello: It appears you’re doing great! Keep up whatever you are doing, including avoiding alcohol and cigarettes and eating healthy foods. Your ALT/SGPT test result shows you have no signs of liver damage and your viral load (HBV DNA) appears low. Good luck.

    1. Hello: Could you please clarify, is the 35.45 mIU/mL measuring your hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb) or your hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)? Thank you.

      1. Hi ,
        I also dnot know what it is . actaully my wife has chronic HBV and i was vaccinated . i asked the doctor that to know how much my vaccination is working .doctor advice me for serology/immunology test . the above readings belong to that report . in the report it is return that it is reactive.My hbsag is negative .do i have to go for any further test please advice i am enterly in confusion.

        1. Hello: If you test negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and test positive (reactive) for the hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), it means you are not infected and you are protected — through your surface antibodies — against hepatitis B, so you and your wife are fine. But as always, check with your doctor to make sure those are your results. Good luck.

  190. Hello sir
    I had in 2007 acute infection of hbv. After six months I got report as below.

    Hbsag negative (test repeated 3 times)
    Hbsab .5 miu/ml
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab postive

    LFT normal.

    In 2015 test report shows as

    Hbsag non detected
    Hbsab 4 miu/ml

    LFT is normal.
    Please tell me the state.
    Am I contagious?? And spread infection.

  191. Thanks, you earlier email you indicated that keep up whatever you are doing and there is no sign of liver damage. Would it be possible that the virus still in the blood or is it be acute infection that go away itself or chronic infection? Still wondering if the infection exited in the blood? Or it could be a false blood test results. Since the test results are only a one month old.

    Thanks. Amo.

    1. Hello: If you still test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), this means you are still infected with the virus. Once you clear (test negative for) HBsAg and develop the hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs or HBsAb), then you have totally cleared the infection. If you have an acute infection, that takes several weeks or months, if you are chronically infected, that process may take years, or it may never be cleared. Good luck.

  192. Hello! I have never had hepatitis in my life. My boyfriend has hepatitis B so to be protected I finished 3 doses of vaccination. 3 months have passed since my last dose of vaccine so I did HbsAg and antiHBs tests. These are the results : HbsAg 0.34 (negative) and antiHBs 707.91. Do these results mean that I am protected from Hepatitis and can have a normal sexual life ? Thank you !

    1. Hello: Yes, your results show your immune system has generated lots of surface antibodies to fight infection. According to medical guidelines, you need at least 10 mIU/mL to be fully protected, and you far exceed that level with 707.91. Good job!!!

  193. please i am hbv positive but i recently tested viral inactive phase. i told my fiancee who is not here before i got the virus to vaccinate in South Africa but unfortunately the clinic Doctor did not run blood test on her before vaccinating her and gave her five years to vaccinate again and i told her it was wrong because all in know is three shots not just one for five years . so i asked her to go to a different clinic and she tested positive for hbv. please is it possible for the vaccination to cause her infected?
    this the drug they used to vaccinate her Heberbio hbv adult single dose injection.please my second question is can we two get marry if we are both positive and how safe will our children be?

    1. Hello: The hepatitis B vaccine is administered in three doses, the second one is administered 30 days after the first and the third is given six months after the first. If she was vaccinated and then a few days later tested for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), she may have tested positive because of the vaccination. However, she may test positive because she has been infected in the past. She needs to be tested completely for hepatitis B, and if she is found not to be infected, she must complete her vaccination series. If she is infected, you may of course marry and have children, however the baby must be immunized within 12 hours of birth with the first vaccine dose, and also given a dose of HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies). Good luck.

  194. Hello. I have one question. Last month I was in hospital because i had acute hepatitis b. I had jaundice and my ALT and AST was very high between 1600 and 3000. After three weeks they let me home. My doctor said me to stay home next month but I didn’t listen. I started with my job. I was very well but from last week I feel pain below the right ribs, and on the other side of the body near the spine (I didn’t feel pain in hospital) and on the other side of the body near the spine. I feel like throwing up. My blood tests from last week are within normal limits. Is these problem normal for acute phase of diseases, or not? Did I have reason for worrying?

    1. Hello: It is unusual for hepatitis B to cause abdominal pain, because there are few sensory nerves around the liver. You did the right thing to return to your doctor and get your liver tests done. It may be something else, often abdominal discomfort in that area is traced to the gallbladder. Please continue to consult with your doctor, especially if the symptoms do not diminish. Good luck.

  195. Two weeks ago I was tested positive for hepatitis b but my five months pregnant wife is negative and two year ago I donated blood after been screened ,I make attempt to get my wife vaccinated but I was told that it is contraindicated for pregnant women, please advise me . and how long after exposure for the test to be positive

    1. Hello: According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) your pregnant wife can safely be vaccinated against hepatitis B, and should be vaccinated given the fact her husband has hepatitis B. Please contract her doctor’s office and refer them to the following information, and to the CDC website at: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pubs/preg-guide.htm#hepb
      • Pregnancy is not a contraindication to vaccination. Limited data suggest that developing fetuses are not at risk for adverse events when hepatitis B vaccine is administered to pregnant women. Available vaccines contain noninfectious HBsAg and should cause no risk of infection to the fetus. 2
      • Pregnant women who are identified as being at risk for HBV infection during pregnancy (e.g., having more than one sex partner during the previous 6 months, been evaluated or treated for an STD, recent or current injection drug use, or having had an HBsAg-positive sex partner) should be vaccinated. 3
      Good luck, and congratulations on taking excellent precautions and becoming informed.

  196. Hi! Thank you for this great website. It has a lot of great information. I am an inactive carrier of hep-B from my mother since birth (I am 33 now). Ever since I can remember, I have gotten yearly blood tests for alfa feta protein and my mother was always worried about liver damage. She did mention hep-B before and every time I went to the doctor, he would tell me I was a hep-B carrier, but nobody ever told me what that meant. My mom told me that when I was born, she didn’t know anything about hep-B and so I never received the vaccine. I’ve lived my entire life with this, but always thought it was just a normal thing (my mother said many Asians have it) and nothing to be concerned about as I never showed symptoms. Nobody ever made a huge deal about it, including my doctor, and I lived my life thinking being a carrier was nothing out of the ordinary and meant that I did not have the active disease, but could transfer it via blood, but could not sexually. I never really looked into it and thought it was no big deal. It was never on the forefront of my mind. I recently became sexually active with a wonderful girl that I care about dearly. The thought of my inactive hep-B never crossed my mind until after the act. It was irresponsible of me to not look into this more before we had sex, I admit, but I was not educated on the severity of this disease, even in an inactive state, but becoming sexually active made me want to look further into it. After reading a bunch about it, I learned that even in an inactive state, it is possible, though not too likely, to transmit it sexually. I told her about this and she was, understandably, very upset. I asked her to get tested and to get the vaccine and also the immune globulin, which she will, but the conversation did not go over too well. I betrayed her trust and though she understands I wasn’t ‘hiding’ this from her, she said it was incredibly irresponsible of me to not understand my own condition and now have it potentially affect her (she is right). I’m not trying to pass the buck here, but I wish my doctor and parents told me more details on this when I was growing up and had told me to not only check for alfa feta protein, but also HBsAG, HBsAb, HBcAb, HB DNA, HBeAg, etc. I recently got a blood test and asked specifically for these results, though my insurance won’t let me get all of them at once – they have to start with HBsAG, HBsAb, and HBcAb, then move on to more detailed tests depending on those results. My question for all of you that have had the talk with your sexual partners is how did you broach the subject and how did they react? Regardless of what her tests come back as, I doubt our relationship will be the same, which breaks my heart, but I understand that I did something terrible. I have read a lot of comments on here about partners/spouses/etc staying together and getting educated about it together afterwards and though I may have firebombed this relationship, I’d like to know of ways to talk about this without illiciting too much fear. When I told her, I was very nervous because I didn’t know how she’d react and I was also very concerned for her health, which didn’t help things as she got very nervous as well. I tried to keep telling her that I was inactive and that transmission is not likely, but I couldn’t lie and say it was impossible. Anyway, thank you again for all the information!

    1. Hello: Thank you for your thoughtful sharing of your experience. Unfortunately, the majority of people infected with hepatitis B (and also HIV and hepatitis C) do not know they’re infected, and many don’t have the accurate information they need about hepatitis B to protect their partners and family members. Sometimes parents want to protect their children and don’t disclose the full scope of the infection, and when you get older, it gets more difficult to share that information. Also, many doctors don’t adequately screen patients for hepatitis B or educate them about risk and prevention, so the blame extends far beyond your family. I hope your girlfriend is able to forgive you, and hopefully she was vaccinated as a child and will not be infected and you were practicing safe sex (with a condom) to reduce infection. Starting now, you need to take care of your health and get tested not only for hepatitis B and viral load, but also get a liver function test to make sure the infection is not harming your liver. That is a blood test for ALT, which liver cells release when they are damaged. Average ALT levels for men are around 30 or less. To read a blog about one parent’s attempt to prepare their HBV-infected child for dating and sexual relations, check out: http://hepbblog.org/2015/08/12/preparing-for-college-dating-and-disclosing-hepatitis-b/
      Good luck.

  197. My last test results are:

    anti HBc 9,37 Reactive
    anti HBe 0,18 Reactive
    anti HBS 71,78 Reactive
    Anti HCV 0,05 Nonreactive
    HBsAgQ2 0,21 Nonreactive

    AST and ALT are in normal range.

    Whether this results mean that I m cured and I cant develop chronic infection?

    Thx in advance for response!

    BR

    FA

    1. Hello: You have wonderful lab results, you have cleared a hepatitis B infection, as indicated by the presence (reactive) of hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti HBS), and are cured and shouldn’t develop a chronic infection. Your ALT test results indicate you have no liver damage, and the Anti HCV test shows you have not been infected with hepatitis C. Congratulations! Good luck.

  198. I have had a positive test for IgM antibody to hep B core antigen. All the other tests for surface antibodies etc. are negative. My doc assumes a false positive as I have no signs of acute infection & other blood work is perfect & no risk factos, but is following up w/ more tests as I am about to start rx for lymphoma. I have had the same sexual partner for 20 years. If it turns out I AM acutely infected should I assume a)my partner has cheated or b)my partner had chronic Hep B all these years and didn’t know it, and I only got infected recently (how is THAT possible)?

    1. Hello: Hepatitis B is known as a “silent” infection because it exist for years or decades without causing any symptoms. It is possible either you or your partner were infected as a child and had “inactive” hepatitis B for many years without it ever showing any clinical red flags. The majority of people in the U.S. infected with hepatitis B do not know they have it.
      However, and this is very important, because you have been infected in the past, you could experience a reactivated infection, with a sudden uptick in viral load and potential liver damage, if you take an immune-suppressing drug (such as chemotherapy for lymphoma.) Your immune system has been strong enough to keep the infection in check, however if your immune system is weakened by an immune-suppressing drug, your hepatitis B may return. Like chicken pox, there are always a few hepatitis B virus lurking in our bodies following infection even if our immune system is keeping it in check. It is important that your doctor continue to monitor your hepatitis B, such as with a viral load test, during treatment, and even proactively start treating you with an antiviral before chemotherapy begins to make sure your hepatitis B does not reactivate.
      Here is a good overview about the risk of hepatitis B and cancer treatment: http://www.cancer.net/research-and-advocacy/asco-care-and-treatment-recommendations-patients/screening-hepatitis-b-virus-starting-cancer-treatment
      Good luck.

    1. Hello: If you are a healthy adult and become infected, most people have a short-term or acute hepatitis B infection that their immune systems are able to clear in six months. If your wife was infected during childhood, her immature immune system wasn’t able to recognize the virus and she may have developed a long-term or chronic infection. To determine which hepatitis B infection she has, she must get tested for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) over a six-month period. If she tests positive or reactive for HBsAg for six months or longer, then she is considered to have a chronic infection. Good luck.

  199. I’ve had a blood test and it came positive with HBsAg. I’d like to know what tests should I take now to know my condition well.

    1. Hello: Your doctor will want to do more tests, to examine what hepatitis B antigens and antibodies are present in order to see what stage of infection you are at, and they’ll want to run a blood test on your ALT/SGPT levels. This level rises above normal (which is up to 30 for men and 19 for women) when the infection damages liver cells and they release ALT. To find out more about blood tests, please visit http://www.hepb.org/patients/your_blood_tests.htm
      Good luck.

  200. Hello, I just tested positive for the Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) with 2900 S/co. What does this this mean? Is that the viral Load? Im 20 and I think I got the diseases a 3-4 months ago. Does that mean is it acute or chronic? I’m very confused and upset Help me please

    1. Hello: The hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is the viral protein or antigen that is present when you are infected with hepatitis B. That measurement is for that antigen. Viral load is measured using a reference to HBV DNA. Usually when healthy adults are infected with hepatitis B, their immune systems can take up to six months to clear the virus. Make sure you are tested six months after your first test to find out what your status is. When people are infected as newborns or as children, their immature immune systems don’t recognized the virus and it can develop into a chronic or long-term infection. Be sure to eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and practice safe sex as your body fluids and semen can transmit the virus. Good luck.

  201. Dear,
    I have acute hepatitis b, I was three weeks in Hospital my AST and ALT were very high. Today is two months since I got out of hospital. I have done blood test and my AST and ALT are normal. I have done test for virus, and is said HBsAg positive and HBs Ab <2 U/l What this means? Is my body start with producing antibodies, or it means that I am negative for HBs Ab ( I know that I need minimum 10 U/l to become immune).
    Thank you very much for your answer and help.

    1. Hello: Your immune system is clearly fighting the infection, and I’m happy to hear your ALT levels are normal, indicating no liver damage. Hopefully your immune system will generate more hepatitis B antibodies to reach the detectable level, which indicates you have cleared the infection. Good luck.

    2. Hello: Congratulations, I am happy to hear your ALT levels are down to normal. During an acute hepatitis B episode is it is not uncommon for your ALT levels to climb as your immune system works to get rid of the infected liver cells. Keep getting tested and consult with your doctor, hopefully your hepatitis B surface antibody level will rise to more than 10 mIU/mL, which means you have cleared the infection. Good luck.

  202. Dear Sir
    I am tested HBs Ag positive and reactive
    Following are the test results
    Sr. Albumin 4.8 gms %
    Total bilirubin 0.5 mgs%
    Direct Bilirubin 0.22mgs
    Indirect Bilirubin 5
    SGPT 146 u/l
    Sr alkaline phosphate 284.0lu/l
    SGOT 80u /l
    Sr Gama – GT 45u/l
    SGOT 80u /l

    1. Hello: Have you tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months? If you have, that means you have a chronic (long-term) infection, otherwise you have an acute infection. Your SGPT is high, indicating there is some liver damage occurring. If you were recently infected, that may mean that your immune system is attacking the infected liver cells in order to get rid of the infection. Please consult with your doctor and continue to get monitored for liver damage and hepatitis B status. Good luck.

  203. Pls doc, i am hepatitis b positive so do my wife. we just got married but we didnt text for hep b. i believe i contracted it from her when we were dating because i tests on some of her family members including his younger brother were positive. i also made my younger brother tested and was negative. i have made him take vaccine any way.
    I started some medication and three months into it my ALT and AST levels reduced significantly almost to normal eventhough i was still positive. This encouraged me to continue this herbal medication hoping for the next three months into its use ,it will be normal with probabaly undetectable virus. But to my suprise after the next three months of the same medication, my ALT and AST levels has increased again to the previous levels before medication. I cant understand the situation. The lab technician who did the LFT told me that is how AST and ALT behave. it will go up and down until viral load reached undetectable levels. im not convinced bcos i think once they come down, being on medication shd not let it go up again. The doctor told me that once my wife is positive and not on medication, i shd not have unprotected sex with her but i did. could that unprotected sex have increased my viral load which has caused my AST and ALT to go up because before they came down my wife was not with me. Also , he asked me not to eat fresh meat but i once eat one small piece of chicken within that period. or could it be the medication has lost its efficacy. pls i need advise so i can know the next line of action because im deciding on changing the medication. My next question is that, is there any relationship between viral load and AST and ALT levels? does it mean that higher AST and ALT levels mean higher increasing viral load? thanks

    1. Hello: If you have tested positive for hepatitis B for longer than six months, it means you have a chronic infection, which you may have contracted when you were very young. You may have become infected when you were young from a re-used syringe/needle. And, it is not uncommon for some siblings to become infected from their mothers and not others, depending if you were vaccinated or whether your mother’s viral load was high at the time of your birth. You lab or doctor is right, ALT levels can fluctuate as a result of stress or illnesses not related at all to hepatitis B. Experts recommend a healthy diet, that can include meat. Also, most herbal supplements do not reduce viral load and have very little impact on your infection. I hope your wife is tested regularly also. If and when you have children, it is very important that the baby is vaccinated with the first hepatitis B dose within 12 hours of birth.
      Also, generally doctors do not recommend treatment unless your viral load is high and your ALT tests show liver damage. Among the best things to do for yourself is eat healthy foods and avoid cigarettes and alcohol. Good luck.

  204. Hai sir. If anti hbs is 74 iu/ml means how long this value remain in our body? Again vaccine needed with interval? Or vaccine no need for life long?

    1. Hello: As long as you hepatitis B antibody (anti hbs) is above 10 mIU/mL, you do not need a vaccine. Over time, the antibody levels in your body may gradually decline, that is natural. However, your immune system will always be primed and ready to fight the infection if you are ever exposed. Good luck.

    2. Hello: As long as you have that level of surface antibodies, you should be protected for live against hepatitis B and you do not need any boosters. Good luck.

  205. Hi, I was tested HBsag negative after 5-6 months of sexual contact.. Does that mean I can get Hep /b positive after 6 months? This is confusing.

    1. Hello: It can take several weeks after exposure to the hepatitis B virus for a lab test to identify an infection. If you are testing negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) after five or six months of exposure, it means you were not infected. Please get vaccinated to protect yourself in the future. Good luck.

      1. i just wanna ask if there’s a chance for me to work still even i am reactively diagnosed with hepa b.. the bureau that I had applied in was able to diagnosed me with hepa b reactive

        1. Hello: In the U.S., it is illegal to discriminate against anyone based on their hepatitis B status. Unfortunately, in other countries especially in the Middle East, governments and employers restrict employment by people with hepatitis B. There is no medical basis for this and it is a terrible violation of human rights. Where do you live? If you visit the World Hepatitis Alliance website, http://www.worldhepatitisalliance.org, they list hepatitis support organizations in a variety of countries around the world. Perhaps you could find an organization near you and work with them to expand civil liberties protection in your country. Good luck.

  206. Hi I am 25 year old. I am recently positive hbsag slide test. I was see the slide to the physician the physician tell me you have chronic hbv. I am shocked next time I go to another dr. My anti hbc Igm antibody + ve, dr. Say you are acute infection and can resolve. I am so confused so please tell me any slide can differentiate acute or chronic hepatitis b. Please and tell me about my recovery chances. .