Hep B Blog

Diagnosed with Chronic Hepatitis B? What do the HBe Blood Tests Mean?

Your liver specialist has informed you that you have a chronic hepatitis B infection, and that he wants to run additional blood work so he can learn more about your HBV. Some of this blood work may need to be repeated over a period of time, but over the next 6 months or so, your doctor will determine whether or not you are a good candidate for treatment.  Regardless, he will definitely want to continue monitoring. Remember, treatment is important, but rarely an emergency, so be patient.

Now you need additional lab work to determine your HBe status, which will tell you whether or not you are HBeAg and HBeAb (anti-HBe) negative or positive. This reveals a great deal about your HBV such as whether or not the virus is replicating, and how infectious you are to others.

At this point, it is helpful to have a little background on antigens and antibodies.  An antigen is a foreign substance in your body that evokes an immune response. This may include viruses, bacteria or other environmental agents such as pollen or a chemical. In this case, it is the HBV e antigen. Your previous hepatitis B panel tested for the surface antigen, or HBsAg.

Antibodies are produced as a result of an immune system response to antigens. These antigen/antibody pairings are unique. An antibody response can be generated as a result of an immune response to an actual infection, or as a result of vaccination.  An uninfected person vaccinated against hepatitis B will generate an immune response, or surface antibody (HBsAb, or anti-HBs) to the HBV vaccine.

The hepatitis e antigen, or HBeAg, is a marker of an actively replicating HBV virus infection. Those with a positive HBeAg have active replication in their liver cells, more of the virus circulating in their blood, and as a result, they are more infectious, with a higher likelihood of transmitting HBV to others.  Most often, when a person is HBeAg positive, they tend to be HBeAb negative and vice-versa. This active, replicating phase may go on for weeks, as in the case of an acute infection, or for years, or even decades in those chronically infected.

Eventually most move into a non-replicative stage. During this time, e antigen (HBeAg) is no longer in the blood, and the anti-HBe antibody (HBeAb) is generated and appears in blood work. This HBeAg serconversion, or loss of HBeAg and the gaining of the antibody, HBeAb, can happen due to treatment, or spontaneously without treatment. Entering this stage is typically a good thing, and is often a goal of treatment.  However, monitoring by your liver specialist bi-annually or at least annually is essential, even if you have had an HBeAg serconversion years ago and are considered in the non-replicative phase.

HBV is complicated, and sometimes you may relapse. In other words, you may seroconvert losing HBeAg and gaining the HBeAb antibody, but it may not be durable, and you may have an HBeAg reversion to an actively replicating stage where you are once again HBeAg positive and HBeAb negative.  Years ago they called it “flip-flopping”.  This possibility is one of many reasons why regular monitoring by your liver specialist is so important.

The other possibility is the development of HBe-negative hepatitis B, which is the result of hepatitis B mutations. These precore or core promoter mutations replicate without generating the HBe antigen. However, they are actively generating the virus, though typically not at the levels of those with HBeAg positive HBV.  Once again, it is critical to continue regular monitoring by your liver specialist, so you are sure you have not begun active generation of HBe negative mutations.

Additional blood work ordered by your liver specialist will further clarify your HBeAg and over-all HBV status, and whether or not treatment may benefit you.

More next time…

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714 thoughts on “Diagnosed with Chronic Hepatitis B? What do the HBe Blood Tests Mean?”

  1. I like the helpful info you provide in your articles. I will bookmark your blog and check again here frequently. I’m quite certain I’ll learn many new stuff right here! Best of luck for the next!

      1. Hello: When you refer to the envelope antibody, I believe are you referring to the hepatitis “e” antibody (HBeAb or anti-HBe). The hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) is one of the proteins that make up the hepatitis B virus. When HBeAg is present (reactive), it means you have lots of hepatitis B virus replicating in your liver. Over time, your immune system creates antibodies to eradicates antigens, and when you test positive/reactive for the “e” antibody, it’s a good thing, because it means your immune system has cleared out the “e” antigen and your viral load (HBV DNA) is probably low. Talk to your doctor, there are other tests such as viral load (HBV DNA) that will give you more information about your infection stage. The World Health Organization has hepatitis B testing and treatment guidelines that you can review with your doctor at: http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/
        Thank you.

      2. I’m confused,am having conflicting results some results gave me positive hbsag and many others gave me negative.my last profile test was hbsag(-) hbsab(-) hbsag(-)hbsab(+) hbcab(+) please I need further education on this

        1. Hello: If you lose the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and develop surface antibodies (HBsAb), then that means your immune system has cleared the hepatitis B infection.
          However, some people lose HBsAg, but never develop surface antibodies after a chronic infection. As long as you continue to test negative for HBsAg and have an undetectable viral load and no signs of liver damage (normal ALT/SGPT levels), then doctors consider you to have cleared the infection.
          For more information on this, please read: http://www.hepb.org/blog/forget-surface-antibodies-if-you-have-both-undetectable-viral-load-and-hbsag-you-might-be-functionally-cured/
          Good luck.

  2. Hi Dr. Singh,

    After reading your informative article, I’m still not sure what my recent blood test means, please help. Thank you. Here’s my result:
    1. HBV DNA not detected;
    2. Hep Be Ag = Positive (Abnormal);
    3. Hep Be Ab = Positive (Abnormal).

    Ana

    1. I don’t know Dr. Singh, but it looks like you may have seroconverted. At this time your HBV DNA appears to be undetectable, but you are both HBeAg and HBeAb positive. Usually either one or the other is positive and the other negative so perhaps you just seroconverted or will revert back. I would retest in another 3-6 months and talk to your liver specialist to discuss how your results look.

  3. Dr. am confused about my situation and dont know my exact status. i have read many articles and still cant decide my faith. this is my test results, HBsAg -, HBsAb -, HBeAg +, HBeAb +, HBcAb – . i was diagnosed of hepatitis last two years and i went for another test just last month and the current results is what i have given above. my doctor said “its acute and mild” but i was diagnosed two years ago of the infection and and i know after six month if the body is not able to resolve it turns to chronic. could you please explain my results and the possibilities . thank you

    1. Have you consulted with a liver specialist? It sounds like you have a chronic infection. At this time you may be in the process of seroconverting and losing HBe and gaining the antibody. Follow up with your doctor in 3-4 months to see if there has been a change to HBeAg neg, HBeAb pos. This would indicate you are likely moving into an inactive phase of the virus. Wait to see how the next set of tests look.

  4. Greetings Dr.,

    I am a little confused about my situation. I donated blood and I got a message saying I was HBsAg reactive and anti-HBc reactive. My PCP thought I was fine, but ordered additional blood work and refered my to a gastro doctor.

    My further blood tests were as follows:
    HBsAg reactive, but non-reactive in the reference range
    anti-HBc non-reactive
    Hep B Core IGM non-reactive
    HBsAb <5 MIU/ML
    Hep Be Ab reactive
    Hep B Ag non-reactive

    My Gastro Doctor said it looked like I either recovered or have a low level chronic infection. He ordered a HepB DNA test, saying this would give conclusive evidence.

    The test came back undectectable, but the nurse said I am an inactive carrier, but am currently non-infectious and shouldn't worry about passing it to others.

    In your estimation is this correct? I had read that generally the HepB DNA test is not used as a diagnostic tool. Should I get a second opinion with a blood doctor?

    My liver panels were also in normal range.

    Thank You.

    1. The HBV DNA test can be used as a diagnostic test when there may be an occult or low lying HBV infection. Because you have no detectable viral load, you are not infectious to others at this time. However I would encourage you to have your HBV checked on occasion in case something changes. You don’t need to see a blood doctor, you want to see a hepatologist or a GI doctor with experience treating hepatitis B should you want an additional consult. Since it appears that you have resolved your infection, or it is very, very low level, you want to be sure to tell your doctors of your past HBV infection if you are ever put on long term immune suppressing drugs such as those that may treat rheumatoid arthritis, or if you are ever treated for cancer.

  5. My niece has an unusual Hep B test results.
    HBsAg =positive HBV IU/mL=130 .HBV copies/mL=800
    Hep B Core Ab,IgM=negative
    HepB Surface Ab,Qual =Non Reactive
    HepBe Ag= negative.All her liver function tests are normal.She never had any symptoms.
    She had Hep B vaccinated when she was 6 years old.She was born premature.
    Does she have HepB ?Is she contagious? Should she be tested again?
    I read all the information related to HepB but could not find an answer to her case.
    Please help!Thank You.

    Please help!Thanks.

    1. Yes. Your niece has a chronic HBV infection. They specifically tested to see if she has an acute infection with the anti-HBc IgM test, which is negative, meaning it is not acute, but rather a chronic infection. Most likely she was infected before she was vaccinated. If you have an HBV infection, the vaccine will not help you clear the infection. Her viral load is not high at 130 IU/mL and she would be considered in the inactive phase of the virus. Most likely she is HBeAg negative. Although she is likely not infectious at this time, it is impossible to say for sure. It is important that close household contacts and sexual partners of your niece be vaccinated to ensure there is no transmission. A person’s HBV status can change over time so it is important to be sure your niece is monitored regularly by a liver specialist to be sure there are no changes to her HBV or her liver health. Should she decide to have children, she wants to be sure all her babies receive prophylaxis to prevent transmission from HBV+ mom to her babies. This prophylaxis includes a birth dose of the HBV vaccine and a shot of HBIG, both within 12 hours of birth. This is effectively prevents transmission for up to 95% of babies born to HBV+ moms.

  6. Hbsag negative
    Hbsab negative
    Hbcab positive
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab positive
    Hbvpci <0.2
    Hbvpcr ×103 k./ml <0.12
    Please help me understand the results …thanks

    1. Assuming you have been HBsAg positive for great than 6 months, I assume you have a chronic HBV infection. You are currently HBeAg negative and have a low viral load. Yo would be considered to be in the inactive phase of the virus assuming your results continue like this. Be sure your ALT(SGPT) is within normal ranges, too. Normal range is less than or equal to 19 IU/mL for women and 30 IU/mL for men. Please be sure to discuss other results with your doctor and be sure to continue with regular monitoring of your HBV and liver health to be sure there are no changes over time. Be sure to talk to your doctor about liver cancer surveillance, and of course take good care of your liver.

  7. My first results were
    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab negative <iu/1
    Hbcab positive….
    My doctor odered for more tests and the results are as posted above,please help…what's my situation….are there more tests I should perform?

    1. Your doctor likely ran liver function tests, but talk to him about these results: ALT/AST, bilirubin,and PT.

  8. Dear Sir
    I was diagnosed as hepatitis positive patient in 1984. Since then I kept performing lab tests. IT ALWAYS showed positive HBeAg and negative HBsAg and negative HBcAg. The blood tests are alwsys in normal range especially liver profile. What should I do?? Should I start interferon course? Or should I go into more fresh liver diagnosis and get biopsy
    please advise

    1. I’m a bit confused with your results. I would ask your doctor to run a hepatitis B panel – one blood test that returns 3 results: HBsAg, HBcAb and HBsAb. When read together these tests can give important information about your HBV. HBcAg is not found in the blood, so it would always be negative. It’s not as common to be HBsAg negative, but certainly possible. You do not mention your HBV DNA (viral load) which is important to look at before considering treatment. I think it’s important to discuss your results with your liver specialist to determine if you would benefit from treatment at the time.

  9. I was diagnosed having chronic hep b few days ago and i was really devastated im only 23 🙁 anti HBe non reactive and HBeAg non reactive my ALT is 24 i read that normal range for women is equal or less than 19, does it mean i would need treatment soon? I My HBV DNA will be coming this week.. Thanks so much

    1. it’s unsettling to learn of a chronic HBV diagnosis at a young age, but honestly it is best since most that are chronically infected have been infected since birth or early childhood. If you are aware of your infection earlier in life you can choose to make healthy lifestyle choices that will benefit your liver and general health. It also gives you the benefit of early evaluation and monitoring and possibly treatment of your HBV rather than learning about it decades later when you may actually develop obvious symptoms. Your liver is non-complaining organ so many have no idea about their chronic HBV infection for many decades.

      So it looks like you are HBeAg negative which typically indicates a less active phase of the virus. lets see how your HBV DNA looks. It’s impossible to know if you would benefit from treatment at this time. Your ALT is elevated, but not by much. Keep in mind that your ALT can elevate for reasons other than your HBV infection. If you have been sick recently, it may be affected. it’s also good to take a look at your lifestyle and consider if you would benefit from some changes. Be sure you avoid all alcohol. HBV and alcohol is a bad combination. If you smoke, please try to stop. Look at the foods you are eating and focus on a variety of vegetables, fruits, whole grains and limited lean meats. Skip fast foods and processed foods and meats. Take a look at the refined sugars you take in a try to cut back on sweets and sodas. Don’t forget to add in regular exercise to your routine, too. Try this for a few months and take a look again at your ALT and see if it makes a difference.I encourage you to focus on the positive. No one wants to have a chronic illness, but most with HBV can live long, full lives and do everything they had ever hoped to do with their lives.

  10. pls am from Africa but study in Asia(malaysia) i was diagnosed with hepatitis HBsAG reactive. and stated in my result that am asymptomatic.
    and here are the investigation results:
    HBs Ag-reactive
    HBe Ag-non-reactive
    HBe Ab -reactive
    Albumin-46 g/L
    AST-15 U/L
    ALT-16U/L
    Ultrasound of the hepatobiliary system was normal
    therefore, he has chronic hepatitis B in inactive phase.
    So, the school want to send me back to my own country for further treatment, and i want to ask if hepatitis B positive can change to Negative and how long it is going to take to change. pls try to understand my situation well and reply me. thanks

    1. It sounds as though you are in the inactive phase of the virus, though you do not mention a viral load to confirm. Unfortunately, in Malaysia, they discriminate against students and workers who test HBsAg positive. This is a very unfortunate and unfair policy, but this is not uncommon in a number of countries.

      At this time there is no treatment that will guarantee a loss of HBsAg and gaining of the antibody. Even if you return to your own country, you will not be able to receive treatment that will make you lose HBsAg. For whatever reason, they do not seem to understand that those in the inactive phase of the virus do not benefit from treatment available at this time. However, they are not infectious to others and not a risk.

      You can try to appeal their decision. In the US, HBV is covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) so students and employees are not discriminated against if they have chronic HBV. Also, the CDC updated their recommendations stating that students and employees wishing to work in health care should not be discriminated against as a result of their chronic HBV infection. I will include these links so you can share them with your school or other authorities. It will likely take time to make policy changes that permit foreign students with HBV to remain in country for school or work, but you have to start somewhere by raising the profile and bringing it to the attention of decision makers.

      Updated CDC Recommendations for the Management of Hepatitis B Virus–Infected Health-Care Providers and Students
      http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr6103a1.htm
      Justice Department Settles with the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Over Discrimination Against People with Hepatitis B
      http://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/2013/March/13-crt-271.html

  11. Good day Sir ,I was infected with HBV in 2007 and that time my virus load was 9.4*10^4 by pcr qnt,HBeAg -ve and ALT was 71.My hepatalogist started my treatment. I took adefovir for 1 year and enteavir for 2 year.HBV DNA by pcr become nagative and HBe Ab +ve and normal LFTs right after 2 year of infection.I stopped my treatment and after 8 month of stoppageHBV DNA was still -ve but HBsAg is reactive by eliza 3700 cutoff 1.Please ellaborate my disease status.Am I suitable to immigration to other countries and marriage? THANKS A BUNDLE

    1. Unfortunately those countries that discriminate against those that are chronically infected with hepatitis B screen only for HBsAg. Even when a person is in the inactive phase of the virus, most of them do not seroconvert and lose HBsAg and gain the antibody. So there are some countries that do not discriminate as a result of chronic HBV infection, but countries such as the Gulf Coast countries will not permit immigration for anyone that his HBsAg positive. However, you are certainly able to get married. HBV is a vaccine preventable disease. Please be sure your future spouse or any sexual partners are protected with the HBV vaccine or that you are practicing safe sex using condoms. It is very unfortunate that some countries discriminate, so you will need to look into the immigration requirements of the countries of interested. chronic HBV should have no impact on getting married and having a family free of HBV. Be sure all children receive a birth dose of the HBV vaccine followed by other shots of the series according to schedule.

  12. Appreciate your reply and advice, just got my HBV DNA results and it is 3,608 iu/ml my ultra sound were all normal. My gastro still dont recommend any treatment for me. Is he correct? Or should i ask second opinion from hepatologist who are more expert with my illness?

  13. I also took hep A test and im negative so i will be getting vaccine soon. I have read that it is good if i will undergo liver cancer test is it the AFP? What is SGOT for? Because my gastro didnt ask me to test that. Thank you very much! This site is really helpful 🙂

    1. You may be in the process of seroconverting and losing HBeAg and gaining the antibody since you appear to be both HBeAg neg and HBeAb neg (it is difficult to find your previous comments since there is no thread connecting them). Re-test in a few months (3-4) for HBeAg/HBeAb and ALT and see how the result look. If you seroconvert and become HBeAg neg and HBeAb pos then you have seroconverted and are likely moving into an inactive phase of the virus. this may cause a lowering of your ALT and possibly your HBV DNA. If this is the case, treatment would not be necessary. Re-check in a few months. While you wait take good care of your liver health as best you can by living a healthy lifestyle

  14. Hello Good day this is my result on my screening
    Please enlighten me about the results …many thanks

    HbsAG Screening- Reactive
    HBeAg – 1.34 COI Reactive
    Anti-Hbe – 1.10 COI Non Reactive
    Anti-Hbc Igm- 0.220 COI Non-Reactive
    ALT(SGPT)- 14.2 U/L

    Ultra Sound finding/result- The Liver is not enlarge with homogeneous parenchymal echopattern. It exhibit mildly increased parenchymal echogenicity. No focal solid or cystic mass is noted. The intraheaptic and extra-hepatic blie ducts are not dialed. No calcification is seen. The visusalized gallbladder is unremarkeble Normal size Liver with Mild Fatty Infiltration

    1. You appear to currently have an chronic HBV infection and you are HBeAg positive which means you are in the more infectious stage of the virus. However you seem to be in the immune tolerant phase were your viral load is likely very high,but your Alt is within normal ranges (normal for men is 30 IU/mL or less for men and 19 IU/mL or less for women). At this time your ultrasound does not appear to show damage as a result of your HBV infection. However you appear to have fatty liver disease. Please see a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and liver health. I would encourage you to make healthy lifestyle choices to positively impact your liver health and encourage you take precautions with others so you do not transmit the virus. HBV is transmitted through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Please be sure to keep open cuts, sore, bites, etc covered and be sure to practice safe sex with partners. Be sure to keep all personal items such as razors, toothbrushes, body jewelry, nail clippers etc from others so they are not accidentally shared. Fortunately there is a safe and effective HBV vaccine. Be sure close household contacts and sexual partners are screened for HBV and if they are not HBV positive, then they should be vaccinated to protect against HBV. Please be sure to consult with a liver specialist.

  15. I find this site very helpful.I have tested positive of HbsAg since 2009. A further combo test I did in May 2014 revealed the following;
    HBsAb-negative
    HBeAg-negative
    HBeAb-positive
    HBcAb-positive
    Igm- negative
    My DNA test will be out in two weeks time.
    What does this result mean and is there a cure for it? Thank you.

    1. thank you. It looks like you have a chronic hepatitis B infection. You have been HBV+ for greater than 6 months and your HBcAb IgM is negative. Most likely you are in the inactive phase of the virus since your HBeAg is negative and your HBeAb is positive. You should be able to confirm this with the DNA test, or followup DNA tests. At this time there is no complete cure for hepatitis B, but there are good treatments that can be prescribed to control the virus. Talk to your doctor when your HBV DNA tests come back. Most likely you will not benefit from treatments currently available at this time, which is fine if your HBV DNA is low and liver function tests – particularly ALT are also in range – 30 IU/mL or less for men and 19 IU/mL or less for women.

  16. My brother tested chronic hepatitis b. His liver is inflamed,his eyes are yellowish. Recent result from ultra sound shows that he has liver cancer. Doctors said there is little or no help to be done at this stage. Am from africa, access to medical treatment has been a challenge here. We are really confused and seemed helpless. Urgent ! Pls help. Thank you.

    1. I am very sorry to hear of your brother’s liver cancer diagnosis. Unfortunately the outcomes for those with advanced liver cancer are very poor. Liver cancer often has no symptoms until it has progressed too far and then there is little that can be done about it. This is true even in countries outside of Africa where care is available. The mortality is very high. I am sorry you are unable to get access to medical treatment for your brother. I don’t think there is anything we can do, though we do have a site for those diagnosed with liver cancer, or their caretakers and family. It might help explain some things for you and help with the confusion. You can find the site at http://livercancerconnect.org Once again, I am very sorry to hear of your brother’s diagnosis. Please be sure if others in your family are living with viral hepatitis – HBV or HCV, that they are regularly screened for liver cancer. The best way to survive a liver cancer diagnosis is early diagnosis when there are more options.

  17. We are considering a transplant in India or Israel, do you have information on any hospital that can give us a quality medical care and what is the cost like? Thank you.

    1. I don’t have the answer to your questions. I would encourage you to look at the statistics for the medical centers where you anticipate possible transplantation. Be sure to also look into the cost of post transplant care and medications.

  18. Hello,

    My situation is rather unique, I was immunized as a child for hep B and my last dose was in 2000. I am 25 and last year tested positive with my PCP. I was referring to a gastro doc who retested me and found more virus, and she assumed I recently contracted it. I have my up to date immunization sand went to the doctors often as a child meaning it would have been caught earlier if I was born with it. I just retested last week as HBsAG pos and HBeAB pos. My gastro doc thinks I may be chronically infected, but given my medical history it seems unlikely to me. Is this possible at all? Also do you know anything about MDMA or Ecstasy mimicking viral hepatitis B? If I have an acute infection is it possible for it to take longer than 6 months for my body to fight it off? I am a heavy drinker and use recreationally.

    1. If you had been infected at birth or early childhood, then the HBV vaccine may not have been effective for you. You don’t mention your age, but a birth dose of the HBV vaccine is a relatively new, so unless your mother was HBV+ and she new her status, you would not have gotten a birth dose of the HBV vaccine and a shot of HBIG within 12 hours followed by the other shots in the series according to schedule. If you had HBV as a child, it is very unlikely it would have been discovered. Most people with chronic HBV are infected at birth or early childhood and they do not learn of their infection often for decades. HBV is a silent disease and people don’t learn about it until they develop symptoms decades out or through routine testing or blood donation screening. So would agree with your GI doctor that it is certainly possible that you have a chronic infection. I have not heard of MDMA or ecstasy mimicking HBV, but it seems very unlikely that a full panel of tests run to confirm an HBV diagnosis could be mimicked with a drug. How could you turn up a positive viral load if there is not HBV DNA? Certainly it is possible for some who are newly infected with an acute infection to clear it taking a bit longer than 6 months, but in general many clear it in less than 6 months, so the 6 month number is generally good. While you wait I cannot stress enough the importance of NOT drinking alcohol and using recreational drugs. HBV and alcohol is a very dangerous combination. Please seek help and significantly reduce, preferably stop drinking alcohol and using. Take care with others so you do not transmit HBV to sexual partners and household members. Do not share drug paraphernalia.

  19. In June 2014 hbv DNA was 500,000 iu/ml and I started taking lamivudine. 6 weeks later, hbv DNA reduced to 81 iu/ml. I am hep b e antigen negative and hbeab positive. My hbeab value chaged from 0.74 to 0.00 in 6 weeks after starting lamivudine pls advice me. I am 50 yrs old and smoke but no alcohol

    1. HBeAg and HBeAb don’t need to be measured quantitatively. Just knowing that they are positive or negative is adequate. You know all antigen / antibody levels vary to some degree just like the viral load cycles up and down over time. So, next time, just have your HBeAg and HBeAb measured qualitatively. Continue with regular monitoring. Sometimes people flip-flop between HBe positive and negative. Talk to your liver specialist, continue with regular monitoring and continue taking your antiviral. You have had a very favorable response, but continue with monitoring. Take good care of your liver health. Always avoid alcohol. Remember that smoking is an independent risk factor for liver cancer, so no smoking is best. Maintain a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise. Drink plenty of water rather than sodas and in general think “healthy” – eat healthy, avoid strong odors, talk to your doctor or pharmacist about prescription drugs or over the counter drugs you may be taking. You are also at an age where you want to talk to your doctor about adding liver cancer surveillance to your monitoring.

    1. All of your HBV serologies really need to be looked at together and over time. As I said previously, the antigens and antibodies levels vary over time and actually an antigen/antibody pair is generally like a see-saw, when one is up, the other is down – one negative, the other positive.

  20. pls i was tested hbsag positive n i have started treatment. But before treatment with heptovit, i was having some slight pains at the right side of my chest. Being on the drug for the 3rd month, i still feel the pains though it is not severe as it used to be when i started treatment. what should i do?
    .

    1. You need to see your liver specialist to try to determine the reason for your pain. Heptovit is a supplement, supportive care for the liver. It is not actually a treatment for your hepatitis B, so I don’t know if it would necessarily impact any problems you were having previously or continue to have. Be sure you are also avoiding alcohol, smoking, strong chemical smells etc, and be sure to eat a healthy diet, eating plenty of vegetables, fruit, whole grains etc, drinking plenty of water and getting regular exercise

  21. Hello dr
    I knew have HBV 10 years ago by HBS Ag testing. I didn’t any test for HBeAg.
    20 days ago i test and my dr miss HBeAg testing and forget write that for me. But i test HBeAg today, But result come days later. Please help by these testing, can you guess my HBeAg is positive or negative? And my HBV is active?
    Sorry for bad english, I’m from iran.
    HBS Ag +
    HBs Ab= 1.0 Mlu/ml
    HBe Ab –
    S.G.O.T- AST = 39 S.G.P.T- ALT= 56 Alkaline pho= 179
    ESR 1st hour = 4
    Complete Blood Count= All is normal

    1. No worries about your English! You are correct and you have chronic HBV, though do have some surface antibody. Although you did not seem to have HBeAg testing and only HBeAb testing, I am going to guess that you are HBeAg positive, since typically HBeAg and HBeAB are opposite where one is positive and the other negative. You want to have your HBV DNA checked, and when you do that ask the liver specialist to check your HBeAg to confirm whether or not it is positive or negative. Your ALT (SGPT) is elevated, AST a bit too. Take a serious look at your diet and exercise. Do NOT drink alcohol. HBV and alcohol are a dangerous combination. If you smoke avoid or stop. Eat healthy foods and be sure to get regular exercise. Take care with prescription and over the counter drugs including tylenol/paracetamol,etc. Repeat ALT/AST testing in 3-4 months to see if healthy lifestyle choices makes a positive impact on your SGPT/SGOT. It could also be from your HBV,but you’ll have a better picture once you get all of your results together and you consider the lifestyle changes. Since you are likely HBeAg positive (though you will confirm) then it would indicate that you are in a more infectious stage and likely have a higher HBV DNA (viral load). This means you would want to be sure you practice safe sex or be sure sexual partners are protected with the 3 shot HBV vaccine series. And you would want to take care not to share personal items such as razors, toothbrushes, or items that may have even trace amounts of blood on them. This does not necessarily mean that you require treatment, but you’ll want to carefully discuss your results with your liver specialist while considering age, family history etc. which all play into treatment decisions. Be sure close household contacts are screened and if they do not have HBV or have not resolved an old, acute HBV infection then it would be good for them to be vaccinated.

  22. And after that HBeAg i will have HBV DNA testing. Dr can you guess what is my HBV DNA testing is high or low? Because i can’t wait and nervous.
    Thank you so much

    1. If you are HBeAg positive then it is likely higher, but there is no way to “guess” how high or low. Try not to worry too much but take a look at it when the results come back.

  23. Yeah i always take healthy foods and never eat fast foods for years. No smoke and no drinks.
    I return HBeAg result to you 10 days later.(That hospital is too late for back results)
    Thank you for fast answering ,information and guide. 🙂

  24. Hi,

    Can i ask about my result? it’s quite unusual.

    Hbsag= reactive
    Anti-hbsag=non reactive
    Hbeag=reactive
    anti-hbeag (reversed)= reactivs
    anti-hbc G (reverse) = reactive
    anti-hbc M= reactive
    anti HAV G (reverse)= reactive
    anti HAV M= non reactive

    SGPT=197
    SOT=6.7

    I am quite confused why hbeag and anti-hbeag both reactive?
    Wht is that SGPT is high and SGOT is not, in most cases this should be both high or SGOT is higher.

    Please help. Thanks in advance for the answes.

    1. Most likely you are in the process of seroconverting and losing HBeAg and gaining the antibody. I would retest in a few months to see what your results look like at that time. It would not at all unusual for your ALT to be elevated at this time – particularly if you are in the process of seroconverting.

      1. hello,
        thanks for this. I do hope I will get non reactive test to hbeag. I also want to have another test on other laboratory to confirm this.
        By the way I am pretty sure that my elevated SGPT is due to the sereconversion process of my hbeag, I have researched that when a person at immune clearance phase of hbeag elevated SGPT is expected since immune system is fighting the virus and thus elevated enzymes are expected, once I already sereconverted hbeag ALT levels will become normal. but how soon?
        I have tested all blood chem such as cholesterol, triglycerides and all were normal except that SGPT and SGOT.

        Now I will be having another test in two weeks time including HBV DNA.
        Doctor gave me Godex DS 3times a day, and 4 capsules of gluathione 500mg and vitamin C 500mg 4 capsules also, Is it really helpful that I take that huge amount of glutathione to lower SGPT?

  25. Hi dr
    I knew have HVB 3 years ago .. Last 3months ago my liver test is HBsAg…positive , Anti-HBs…negative, HBeAg…negative, Anti-HBe…positive, Anti-HBc…positive,HBV DNA.. 730 iu/ml (20-1.70 into 10 to the power 8) . But now time my test is HBsAg…positive , Anti-HBs…negative, HBeAg…negative, Anti-HBe…negative, Anti-HBc…positive . What can happen change of Anti-HBe? Now ALT.. 25, AST…20, Bilirubin(total)..5 all are normal. Please reply me sir .. Thanks …

    1. This is good! You have seroconverted and lost HBeAg and gained the HBeAb antibody. This usually means you are in a less active phase of the virus. Following HBe seroconversion, the viral load typically goes to a very low or undetectable level and liver ALT/AST normalizes. Be sure to followup with your doctor to continue regular monitoring to be sure there are no changes to your HBV or liver health. Continue with a healthy lifestyle by avoiding all alcohol, avoiding smoking and maintaing a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise.

  26. HELLO
    my hepatitis b panel reads as follow
    HBsag +
    HBsab –
    HBeag –
    HBeab +
    HBcab +
    i was recently inffected(i am not up to 6 months infected),please i would like to know the interpretation of my results and also to know if i am likely to get rid of the virus thanks

    1. You are still currently infected with HBV. Be sure to repeat the panel to see if you are able to clear the virus. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months.

  27. Hello sir,
    Please suggest for my condition..
    My reports are-
    HBsAg positive
    HbeAg negative
    HBeab positive
    Viral load is also not abnormal
    My doctor says that it is inactive and I need not treatment for now. And I has never been active yet.
    My age is 24 years (f) and I was infected with hepatits A in 2008 but got that cleared within few months. We got to know about the inactive status of hep b virus that time only so we don’t know how and from where it came!
    I am still hbsag positive but I don’t have any complaint and my LFTs are also normal since 2008.
    I also had hep b vaccination at the age of 6 months. And I was operated for pyloric stenosis at the age of 21 days and got a half init of PRBC that time so doctor says that it might have infected me even before getting the vaccination.
    I am doing very well and have no issues regarding liver.
    But my question is, I am preparing for Study in US/ Canada but I m a little worried if I would get the student visa or not! Because I heard that I won’t be eligible for student visa..

    I am from India and I want to go for research to the US or Canada.
    I also heard that I might get hbeag positive in future. Is that possible?

    I will b very greatful to u.. 🙂

    1. Hepatitis B should not prevent you from studying in the US or Canada. Neither country screens for HBV. Sometimes people flip-flop and go from being HBeAg negative back to being HBeAg positive. That is why regular monitoring is so important so you are able to track changes with your HBV and liver health over time. I would encourage you to see a liver specialist for regular monitoring.

  28. Thank you so much 🙂
    I am feeling relaxed and more determined now!
    I am seeing a liver specialist for last 7 years regularly and getting my LFTs and HBsAg status checked every six months but nothing abnormal has happened yet.
    I also have G6PD deficiency so I face low HB issues sometimes but I am having diet that can increase my HB.

    Thanks once again 🙂

    1. Good! Glad we were able to alleviate some of your concerns. Very glad to hear you are getting regular monitoring by a liver specialist as this is very important.

  29. Hello,
    my hepatitis b panel reads as follow
    HBsag – Recative
    HBeAG serum -Non reactive
    HBe antibody – Recative
    HB core antibody total – Recative
    HB core IGM – Non reactive
    please i would like to know the interpretation of my results.

    1. Hello, Based on your test results it appears that you have a chronic infection (your anti-HBc IgM is negative) You are HBeAg negative/HBeAb positive which typically indicates a less active phase of the virus, but you will want to see a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and liver health. Your doctor needs to check your liver enzymes (ALT/AST) and liver function tests, and if possible your HBV DNA. This will give you more information about your HBV and liver health. Please take care with your liver. Do NOT drink alcohol, avoid smoking and maintain a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise. Be sure that close household contacts and sexual partners are screened for HBV and if they are not infected or have not resolved a previous infection then they should be vaccinated. Once again, follow up with additional testing with a liver specialist to learn more.

  30. 15.10.2014 I went to general health check-up. And found Hbsag positive. Further doctor had given me reinstruction for following checkup. 1. HbeAg – positive, 2. Anti hbe- Negative, 3. Igm Anti Hbc – positive 4. HBv DNA- 1244446 iu/ml. My alt is 636. Kindly advice me it is acute or chronic hbv infection.

    1. Looks like you likely have an acute infection – note your positive anti-HBc IgM test. However, this is not definitive since sometimes an acute exacerbation of a chronic infection can also cause this test to be reactive. so you will confirm with a test at a later date. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. Your HBV DNA is quite high as is your ALT. You are very infectious at this time, so please take care to avoid transmitting HBV to others. HBV is transmitted through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Keep open cuts, sore, bug bites covered and be sure to practice safe sex with partners unless you are sure they have received all 3 shots of the HBV vaccine series. Do not share personal items such as razors, toothbrushes, nail clippers etc – anything that may have trace amounts of blood on them. Please take care and do NOT drink alcohol. Your ALT is quite elevated. Please check back with your doctor to be sure that your ALT is within safe ranges. I have no idea of your timing, but also take care to repeat testing.

  31. HBe Ag – Negative
    HBc IgM – Negative
    HBc Total Positive
    HBsAg – positive
    HBV ( DNA ) : Negative

    That was at 23 Feb 2006.
    Nowadays still HBsAg is positive

    What does it mean , please ?
    Thank you

    1. It means that you have a chronic HBV infection. I would encourage you to see a liver specialist to learn more about your current HBV status and liver health. Most with chronic HBV will remain HBsAg positive for life, but some of the lab work – particularly the HBV DNA levels, ALT/AST or liver function tests may change over time, which is why regular monitoring every 6 months, or at a minimum every year is recommended. Take care.

  32. Hi Sir,
    Recently I went health check-up and found HBsAg positive. Further I have undergone to following checkup and their results.
    1. HbeAg – positive (130 index)
    2. Anti Hbe- negative (6 index)
    3. Igm anti Hbc- positive (1.80 index)
    4. Hbv DNA- positive ( 1444455 iu/ml)
    5. HbsAg- positive (29000 iu/ml)
    Kindly interpret the above. My age is 33 yrs all report is normal except ALT 600 and AST 200. Plz suggest it is acute or chronic hbv infection.
    Thanks

    1. You either have an acute (new) infection or an acute exacerbation of a chronic infection. Your ALT and AST are quite elevated so you want to be sure to retest these levels to be sure you are in safe ranges. You will also need to repeat your hepatitis B panel 6 months after the first positive HBsAg test. A person is considered chronically infected if they are HBsAg positive after 6 months. While you wait, be sure to take care with your liver health. Do NOT drink alcohol and avoid smoking and environmental toxins. Be sure to eat a healthy, well balanced diet and be sure you are up and around walking or exercising moderately unless you are told otherwise. You are quite infectious at this time so be sure sexual partners and close household members are screened for HBV (there is a 6 week window). Practice safe sex and take care to not share personal items such as razors, toothbrushes, nail clippers or anything that may have trace amounts of blood on them. Most importantly repeat your lab work and if you learn you have a chronic infection then you will want to see a liver specialist to learn more.

  33. Hi Sir,

    Can you help me reading the results of my partner? I am afraid that soon i will be infected too. Do i need to separate his utensils to avoid the infections? And also, does his saliva need to avoid? these are his result :

    HBSAG – reactive
    Anti-HBS – non reactive
    HBEAG – non reactive
    Anti-HBE – reactive
    Anti- HBE (IGG) – reactive
    Anti – HBE (IGM) – non reactive

    SGPT (ALT) – 36.0
    SGPT (AST) – 24.7

    Is there any possibilities that he can survive HBV?

    Please I need an advise.

    Thank you.
    Jenny

    1. Your partner has a chronic HBV infection as noted by the negative IGM test and positive IGG test. He is HBeAg negative which typically makes him less infectious. ALT is slightly elevated at 36 since upper limits of normal are 30 or less for men and 19 IU/mL or less for women. It would be good to get an HBV DNA if possible to see how the viral load looks.

      No one wants to have a chronic illness, but many with chronic HBV are living long, full lives with careers,friends, family and love. You can have it all. My advice for you Jenny, is to get screened to see if you have a hepatitis B infection or if you have resolved a previous infection. Ask your doctor to run a hepatitis B panel. This is one blood test that returns 3 results: HBsAg, HBcAb, HBsAb. When read in relation to each other they give good information about whether or not you have a current HBV infection or a previously resolved infection and if you have immunity to HBV. If you do not have an infection or if you have not resolved a previous infection then you should be vaccinated to protect against HBV. We are so fortunate to have a vaccine to protect against hepatitis B. Get tested and if you don’t have HBV then be sure to get vaccinated to protect. Encourage your partner to see a liver specialist regularly and possibly get a viral load test run.

  34. Can anybody help me read my results?

    My results are:
    HBsAg – REACTIVE
    Anti-HBS – Non Reactive
    HbeAg – Non Reactive
    Anti-HBE – REACTIVE
    Anti-HBcIgM – Non Reactive
    Anti-HBcIgG – REACTIVE

    My previous test had the HBeAg REACTIVE, and Anti-HBE Non Reactive. Is my latest result better than the previous?

    Thanks a lot!

    1. Your test results indicate that you have a chronic infection, but you can confirm by making sure you have tested HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. Serconverting and losing HBeAg and gaining the antibody – anti-HBe (HBeAb) is best and indicates moving into a less infectious stage of the virus. Typically during this phase, the viral load will go down and ALTs should normalize. Discuss with your doctor to be sure.

  35. Hi Dr,
    My ALT and AST level are constantly increase over the last 12 month, first test was ALT 88 then 107, followed by 227 and now 201.
    My current HBeAg is Positive rate 1.41 where Anti HBeAg is negative, rate 1.88 my viral load is 40 IU/ml. My doctor recommend Interferon injections and he said there is fair bit of chance that it will become even lower than detectable rate base on his experience. What are you thought, do think it is necessary for me to go for treatment as my ALT are not coming down.
    Sam

    1. There is always the hope that your ALT/AST elevation with result in HBeAg seroconversion and loss of HBeAg and gaining of the antibody. You appear to be going through this process, but how long it takes to get there and with what damage is the question. There reaches a point where treatment must be considered. Interferon/pegylated injections can be a tough protocol, but the benefit is that the injections are for a finite amount of time (typically 1 year). And of course there is the good possibility of HBE seroconversion. There is also a very small chance of HBsAg seroconversion with this protocol. The other option is antivirals which are taken for years or even for life. That being said, I think immune modulators are a good option – especially in your situation where your ALT is high, you are HBeAg positive and your HBV DNA is low. Be sure you discuss following response guided progress with quantitative HBsAg baseline within the first 12-24 weeks in to see if you appear to be responding and whether or not you should continue. Hope you respond well to the immune modulator should you and your liver specialist decide to move forward.

  36. Thank you for your quick and effective advise. I feel more safe now.

    My partner was advise to see his doctor every 3 months to monitor his SGPT , my question is , Is it enough to monitor only the SGPT? how about the other? Is it okay if he take silymarin as his vitamin?
    Yes, i was advise to take the test by january.

    To be honest with you, I am willing to take good care of him all my life, but i am afraid on whatpeople think of him when they about his condition.

    Thank you for your answer. Im very glad to know about your site.

    More power and God bless!

    1. Sadly there is a stigma associated with hepatitis B. You might wish to choose not to share this information with others. HBV is not transmitted casually, so he can take simple precautions so he does not transmit HBV to others by avoiding direct contact of blood and infected body fluids. And of course there is the HBV vaccine for those that are more at risk and able to be vaccinated.

      It would be good if your partner could learn about his HBV DNA. He is HBeAg negative. Be sure he takes good care of his liver and does NOT drink alcohol and maintains a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise. Regular monitoring is recommended every 6 months to see if there are changes. At a minimum it would be good to repeat labs every year, or as his liver specialist wishes.

  37. Hi,

    I’m sorry i have a lot of questions.
    Does his saliva one of the infected body fluids that we need to avoid?

    the viral load will go down and ALTs should normalize — what does it mean?
    is there a way for HBsAg to become non reactive?

    once HBV DNA was done and the viral load will determine, how does HBV DNA help the patient?

    Thank you so much for answering all of my queries, appreciated a lot!

    1. The viral load going down means the amount of virus in his blood will decrease and normalization of ALT levels means that ALT levels should go to normal levels. There are a very lucky 2-3% per year of those chronically infected that will spontaneously clear their HBV infection and lose HBsAg and gain the antibody. This is a small number, but you can always hope that when he goes for regular monitoring that he will be one of the lucky ones! Saliva does contain the HBV virus in it, but it is not in as high a concentration as it is in blood and other fluids. However, there is a risk with any infected body fluid, but will depend on the viral load of the person with HBV etc.

  38. Hello,
    I am really glad to find this website, helping out people to know better about hepatitis b.
    Sir, I was incidentally found HbsAg Positive few weeks back. Though I didn’t had any kind of symptoms in my body, I came to know that I am HbsAg Positive. Few weeks back I had common cold, due to which I sometime felt inside low temperature fever and weakness, probably due to antibiotic given by physician (Before being diagnosed of Hepatitis). I was dizzy and common cold did last for quite long time(probably 2-3 weeks) at the same time when there was change in climate.
    Later on when I came to know that I am infected, i was asked for others tests too. The reports were like:

    Liver Function Test – Normal
    HbsAg – Reactive (>250.00) Index was >=0.05 IU/ml : Reactive
    HbeAg – Negative (0.01) Index was <0.1 : Negative
    Anti Hbe – Positive (0.01) Index was <0.40 : Positive

    I am not exactly sure what is the status of hep virus in my body and what to do next. How to maintain my health and hygiene? Help me out with your valuable words.

    Thanks

    1. First you want to confirm if you have an acute (new) HBV infection or a chronic infection. I’m not sure why you were tested for HBV – symptoms of the cold or something else? Anyway, be sure to retest. If you remain HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then you are considered chronically infected. If you learn you are chronically infected then you want to get a thorough evaluation by a liver specialist to learn more. To determine if you are acute or chronic, you will have to do another blood test. While you wait to learn more, be sure you do NOT drink alcohol, avoid smoking and environmental toxins and be sure to maintain a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise. Be sure to avoid transmission to others at this time. HBV is spread through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Keep all open cuts etc covered, practice safe sex and do not share personal items that may have trace amounts of blood on them such as razors, toothbrushes, nail clippers etc.

  39. please my cousins went for hep profile and these are the results please help

    MALE COUSIN RESULT

    HBsAg-POSITIVE
    HBsAb-NEGATIVE
    HBeAg-NEGATIVE
    HBeAb-POSITIVE
    HBcAb-NEGATIVE

    FEMALE COUSIN

    HBsAg-POSITIVE
    HBsAb-negative
    HBeAg-negative
    HBeAb-negative
    HBcAb-negative

    pls do they need urgent treatment and are they chronic or acute and which of them

    1. Currently both cousins have a hepatitis B infection. I do not know if it is an acute or chronic infection. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. Both test HBcAb negative, which is unusual. Do you know if it was an HBcAb IgM or HBcAb IgG test perhaps? Female cousin may be in the process of seroconverting and losing HBeAg and gaining the antibody. Male cousin is already there. Usually when the HBe antigen is positive, the HBe antibody will be negative, but of course not always and it will likely go one way or another when you test next. Unless they have concerning symptoms (distended abdomen, jaundice, severe nausea/vomiting) they do not need urgent treatment. They need to repeat testing in 6 months to determine if it is an acute or chronic infection and they need to take care of their liver health by avoiding alcohol, taking care with any medications and eating healthy. They need to also take care to not transmit to others by avoiding direct contact of blood or infected body fluids. Fortunately HBV is vaccine preventable so sexual partners or close household members can be screened and vaccinated to protect.

  40. HBeAg : Non reactive
    HBeAb : Reactive
    HBcAb (Total) : Reactive
    HBV DNA : 1.05 x 10e2 (Log 2.02) IU/mL
    6.11 x 10e2 (Log 2.79) copies/mL
    Expected results : Not Detected

    I am a HB carrier through birth. This is my most recent blood tests and my liver ultrasound also shows no problem. May I know is my HBV active or dormant? If it is active, do I have to take any medications? Should I avoid sharing of food and drinks with others at all cost? Appreciate your kind help.

    1. It looks as though you are in the inactive phase of the virus with a low viral load, HBeAg negative. You do not mention your ALT/AST and your liver function tests. It is unlikely you would require treatment at this time, but it is always best to confirm this by seeing a liver specialist. Please be sure to continue with regular monitoring and always discuss your results with your doctor. Be sure to take care of your liver health by NOT drinking alcohol. Avoid smoking and environmental toxins and be sure you maintain a healthy weight through diet and exercise. HBV is not transmitted casually, but since it is a vaccine preventable disease, it is always good for sexual partners and close household contacts to be vaccinated to protect against HBV. Just take care to avoid direct contact with blood or infected body fluids. Sharing drinks or preparing or eating meals will pose no threat.

  41. Thank you so much for your kind response.
    Actually my dad was found hepatitis B positive, so doctor recommended me to get checked as well. and when I did test I too was found infected. But after doing all the possible test, I was suggested no treatment or medication, in stead I was asked to maintain proper diet and maintain weight. I used to smoke before but I have completely left it from quite long time. The only symptoms I feel, is getting tired and breathing quite faster after I do short run or walk but I am not sure if its due to hepatitis or some other reason. I am trying my best to fight with the virus.
    Is there any way I can get completely recovered??

    1. Unfortunately there is no way to “make” your HBV go away completely at this time with currently available treatments. However, there are a very lucky 2-3% of those who spontaneously seroconvert and lose HBsAg and gain the antibody with an undetectable viral load. It doesn’t happen often, but it is a wonderful thing, though no way to make it happen .Taking good care of your liver and general health is very important so it is good that you no longer smoke and that you are careful with your diet. Don’t forget to continue with regular monitoring in case there are any changes to your HBV or liver health.

  42. Hepatitis Panel Resul
    A-HBe – Reactive
    A-HBc total -Reactive
    A-HAV igm- Reactive
    HBsAg- Reactive
    A-HBS- Non -Reactive
    A-HCV- Non -Reactive
    HBeAg-Non -Reactive

    Blood Chemistry Result

    AST Result SI UNIT
    M:14-50 U/L 37.60 U/L
    F:8-39 U/L

    ALT(SGPT)
    M:13-61 U/L 22.30 U/L
    F:3-42 U/L

    Can anybody help to read my result thank you’

    1. I’m not sure with the way you listed your results… I think you have both a hepatitis A and a hepatitis B infection, but I suggest you speak to your doctor to confirm. Please take care as you might be quite infectious at this time. Talk to your doctor.

  43. 2 years back when I donated my blood. I have found that I am reactive for ANTI-HBV CORE ANTIBODY. My liver expert further examined for HBeAb which was non-reactive (.66)

    Recently I was feeling ill so I again go for below mentioned check
    HBc IgM (Negative 0)
    HAV IgM (Negative 0)
    HEV-IgM Ab to Hepatitis E Virus,serum (Positive 3.79)
    SGOT (AST) (657) Normal 15-37
    SGPT (AST) (1509) Normal 30-65

    What does it mean. Should I worry about my liver status. I am really frustrated with all these thing. What should I do to fight with this. Kindly help.

    1. It appears that you currently have a hepatitis E infection. HEV does not develop into a chronic infection. You likely got it from contaminated water etc. This infection is likely contributing to your elevated ALT/AST. It will resolve on your own, but be sure to talk to your doctor.

      I am not sure whether you have hepatitis B or not. Talk to your doctor about having a hepatitis B panel run. It is one blood test that returns these three results: HBsAg, HBcAb (total), HBsAb. With your current results, all I can tell you is that you do not have an acute HBV infection (negative anti-HBc IgM). The above test with HBsAg, HBcAb and HBsAb will tell you if you have a current HBV infection, or a previously resolved HBV infection, or no infection, though it sounds like you either have a current or past resolved infection. Talk to your doctor about your results. Take care

  44. Hi, here’s my result.
    SGPT: H 64.00 U/L 10.00-50.00
    SGOT: 34.40 U/L 10.00-50.00
    ALP: 76.20 U/L 40.00-129.00
    Albumin: 45.37 G/L 35.00-50.00

    PT Patient: L 12.40
    PT Control: 13.20

    HBsAG w/Titer (CMIA) 1678.34 REACTIVE
    Anti HBs (CMIA) 0.61 NON REACTIVE
    HBeAG 1405.88 REACTIVE
    Anti HBe (CMIA) 93.63 NON REACTIVE
    *Anti-HBe count below the cut-off value is considered reactive

    Anti HBc IgM (CMIA) 0.07 NON REACTIVE
    Antu HBc Total (CMIA) 10.30 NON REACTIVE
    Anti HAV IgM (CMIA) REACTIVE
    Anti HAV IgG (CMIA) NON REACTIVE
    Anti HCV (CMIA) NON REACTIVE

    1. It appears that you may have both a hepatitis A and hepatitis B infection, though some of your results are a bit contradictory, so you will want to retest to confirm for sure what is going on, and of course talk to your doctor. Your ALT is elevated, though not dangerously high. Hepatitis A is self-resolving, so give yourself a bit of time to recover and retest for HBV. Keep in mind that you are contagious for HAV at this time and possibly for HBV so please take precautions to avoid transmission to others. Be sure to take care of you liver during this time and avoid alcohol and maintain a healthy diet. Take care with any prescription or over the counter medications. Talk to your doctor.

  45. Hello,

    First of all, thank you so much for creating this site.
    I have donated blood on Xmas eve and last week I received a letter saying I was infected with Hepatitis B. I am 32 yrs old and since then cannot sleep and am in constant worry and crying because of all the articles published online. I have received the following results today:
    HBsAg result – strongly reactive
    Anti-HBc – positive
    Anti- HBc IgM negative
    HBV DNA – positive
    Anti-HBE – positive
    HbeAg – positive

    They wrote to my doctor saying I need to see a specialist as they cannot interprete the results.

    Can you please advise.

    1. learning about a hepatitis B infection can cause a great deal of stress. Many are like you and learn of their infection following a blood donation, or they are screened during a physical etc. Based on your results, you appear to have a chronic infection and not a new, acute infection. You note that you are both HBeAg and HBeAb positive. It’s very possible you are in the process of seroconverting and losing HBeAg and gaining the antibody. You do not mention if your ALT (SGPT) is in normal ranges or not. A normal ALT for men is 30 IU/mL or less or 19 IU/mL or less for women. I would agree you should see a liver specials to learn more about your HBV and the health of your liver. Hopefully you will seroconvert in the next few months and lose the e antigen and gain the antibody. This would not mean you are clearing your chronic infection but it could mean you are moving into a less infectious stage of the virus which would be good. Right now you have to assume you are infectious to others, so please take care to avoid transmission to others by avoiding direct contact with infected blood and body fluids. Keep open sores, cuts etc. covered, practice safe sex and avoid sharing personal items such as razors, toothbrushes or items that may have even trace amounts of blood on them. Encourage close household contacts and family to be screened for HBV and to be vaccinated if they do have a current HBV infection or have not resolved a previous infection. While you wait to see the doctor, take care of the health of your liver by avoiding alcohol, eating healthy and getting regular exercise. Try to take it one step at a time

  46. Hello,

    This is my results
    Test : Patient Value: Cut-off value: Result:

    HbsAG 1653 1.0 Reactive
    ANTI-HBs 2.00iu/l 10.iu/l nonreactive
    HBeAG 1895 1.0 Reactive
    ANTI-HBe 7.20 1.0 nonreactive

    SGPT SI UNITS 65 u/l, SI REF VALUE 9-72 u/l

    What is my Diagnostic?
    Is this Chronic or Acute?
    Curable?
    What will I do?

    Thanks

    1. A person is considered chronically infected if they continue to test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months, so I cannot say for sure if your infection is acute or chronic. While you wait to learn more, please be sure to prevent transmission to others by avoiding direct contact with blood and body fluids – keep cuts etc covered, practice safe sex with partners and be sure to avoid sharing personal items that may have trace amounts of blood on them such as razors, toothbrushes etc. Please be sure to avoid alcohol and eat a healthy diet while you learn more. If you have a chronic infection be sure to find a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and the health of your liver.

    1. There is no HBV specific diet or a diet that will make HBV go away. However you want to be sure to support your liver by eating a healthy well balanced diet. Do NOT drink alcohol and avoid environmental toxins. Focus on eating vegetables, fruits, whole grains and limited lean meats. Try not to eat fast food or processed foods and meats and avoid too much refined sugar founds in sweets, sodas and many processed foods.

  47. -I am chronic HBV patient, HBeAg positive, ALT upper normal. Under treatment for the last 10 years.
    – HBV DNA has become undetectable since Nov/2012.
    – I was delighted as HBeAg became negative in Sep/14, but showed positive again by Lab test on 31/01/15. Can it occur or the test might be wrong? Anti HBe is negative (sample 1.58, ref range 1.0).

    Will appreciate your kind advice. Regards.

    1. it is not uncommon for the e antigen to flip-flop from HBeAg positive to negative and back again. I know it’s disappointing, but it may once again go back to HBeAg negative. The good news is that our viral load has been undetectable since 2012 and your ALT is within normal ranges.

  48. Dear Doctor,
    I am so confused. I have read through all the posts and can’t find any situations like mine to help me understand my test results. I went to an infectious disease doctor after receiving the following test results and he completely talked over my degree of understanding. Could you tell me what the following results mean? I am so confused, frustrated and scared,
    Hep. B Core Ab. Positive
    HBsAb. Negative
    HBsAg. Negative
    HBeAB Negative
    HBeAg. Negative
    HBV IU/mL. 7970 IU

    1. It’s hard to say since I do not know where you are in the course of lifecycle of the virus when you had your lab tests run. Perhaps this is a new infection? Please rerun your blood work a month or more from the date of the labs posted, and we’ll see how the results look.

      1. It would have to be an old infection as I have been married for 10 years and neither of us have participated in high risk activities – guaranteed. I have had o symotoms and my alt/ast levels are below normal.
        Is one of those the I’m that everyone talks about? The doctor prescribed .5 mg of Entecavir for the rest of my life and I just feel like that’s very aggressive so I am waiting for a month like you recommended before I start any drugs that if I discontinue could cause my viral load to rise.

        1. Not necessarily. HBV is spread through direct contact with blood and other infected body fluids. It is not just a sexually transmitted disease. If proper infection control practices are not followed, it can also be transmitted in a medical or dental setting and many other settings. Once again, I would repeat testing.

          1. I can’t thank you enough for the feedback you openly give to so many people who are frightened and confused.

          2. Thank you for having me do a follow up test. I got the results today and everything was the same (neg hbs ab&ag, neg hbe ab&ag, positive core ab) EXCEPT it states:
            HBV Real-Time PCR, quant; HBV DNA NOT DETECTED
            Even though I still tested positive for the Core Ab my doctor said that I am free to get the vaccination and will be fully immunized. Do you agree and will the vaccination make the Positive Core Ab turn negative? I was so blown away from going from a 7950 viral load to completely undetectable that I kind of blacked out on the rest.

  49. Hi

    My wife is 2 months pregnant, while conducting tests we found her hepitaitis B +ve doctor asked to conduct other tests hepitaitis c and hepitaitis B virus profiling.her hepitaitis c is negative and hepitaitis B virus profiling shows
    hbsag ->250.00
    Anti-Hbs – 0.40
    Anti-HBc,igm – 0.31
    Anti- HBc, total – 12.55
    HBeAG – 0.32
    Anti-HBe – 0.08

    Please let me know is that count dangerous and what we are supposed to do.

    1. It sounds like your wife has a chronic HBV infection, though it is good to know that she does not have a coinfection with HCV. It is very important that you discuss birth prophylaxis with the doctor. HBV is very effectively and innocently passed from an HBV positive mother to her baby. However, birth prophylaxis is effective greater than 90% of the time in preventing transmission. Baby must get a birth dose of the HBV vaccine and a shot of HBIG within 23-34 hours of birth. That is why you want to be sure to arrange this with the doctor and the hospital where your wife will deliver the baby. It is also important that your wife get her viral load and her ALT/AST tested to learn more. If we learn there is a very high viral load, you can also discuss other options with the doctor such as antivirals during the last trimester of her pregnancy. There are very good options to prevent transmission to the baby and to be sure all is well with your wife.

  50. Hi.

    My sister is 5mos pregnant and she is HbsAg positive..Here is the complete results

    HBsAg 208.58
    Anti-HBs 0.10
    HbeAg 0.168
    Anti-Hbe 0.136
    Anti-HBc IgM 0.181
    Anti-Hbc IgG 0.149

    AST 27
    ALT 26

    What should be the result?

    Thanks.

    1. It is important that your sister make arrangements to be sure a birth dose of the HBV vaccine and HBIG are available when and where she plans to have the baby. HBV is very effectively transmitted from an HBV positive mother to her baby. A baby that is infected with birth has a greater than 90% chance of remaining chronically infected and have HBV for life. Fortunately birth prophylaxis given within 12 hours of birth is effective greater than 90% of the time. Please be sure your sister continues to be carefully monitored. She may wish to talk to her doctor about having an HBV DNA test run to learn about her viral load. Your sister should be fine, but she does need to be seen by a liver specialist and she needs to be sure birth prophylaxis is available within 12-24 hours of birth. Please let me know if you have additional questions.

  51. So how about my sister? I mean, is the result means that she is infectious to othrrs? Is her condition okay. Or is that acute or chronic?
    Thanks.

    1. I cannot tell from her test results if she has an acute or chronic infection. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. I don’t now the timing of her test, any previous test or the reference ranges for her anti-HBc tests, so it’s impossible to determine more. What I can tell you is that she currently has an HBV infection. She should see a liver specialist (a hepatologist or a GI doctor with experience treating HBV) Sometimes they can determine more through other testing and intuition, but they always repeat testing. A viral load test will tell you how infectious she is at this time. I would encourage all family members, and household members to be screened for hepatitis B, and if they do not have a current or previously resolved HBV infection, then they should be vaccinated to protect against HBV. My concern with the baby is this particular statistic: 95% of infants that are infected at birth by an HBV positive mother will remain chronically infected with life-long infection. 90% or more of healthy adults newly infected with hepatitis B will clear the infection on their own. Once again, please encourage your sister to see a liver specialist to learn more.

  52. Please help me interpret the lab result of my partner.
    Here is the result:
    Anti HBe 0.01 Reactive
    HBsAG with Titter 4073.84 Reactive
    HBeAg 0.31 Non-Reactive

    Looking forward for your response.

    Thank you!

    1. Sounds like you are in the less active phase of the virus since you are HBeAg negative, though you do not mention your ALT/AST and your viral load so I cannot be sure. A normal ALT for men is 30 IU/mL or less and 19 IU/mL or less for women. I would encourage you to talk to your liver specialist to learn more.

  53. I discovered that my boyfriend got hepa b for about year already and he has a low infectivity and a healthy hepab carrier. we had sex for about two months already and the last wast last February 18, 2015 our last contact. I went to the laboratory test last February 20, 2015 and I asked to get my hbsag only and the result is non reactive. Though it is negative. I am still afraid because I’m not sure if am I really infected since our last contact was February 18, 2015. Is it possible that I can still be infected few months later? Pls help me. I want to make sure that I am not infected.

    1. Good news. Now that you know you are not infected, please start and complete the 3 shot HBV vaccine series to be sure you are protected. Changes to chronic HBV occur over time, so you want to be sure you are protected so you don’t need to worry if there are any changes. Encourage your partner to be sure he is regularly monitored. As for you, please begin the vaccine series as soon as possible. At the end of the series, you can confirm immunity with an anti-HBs titer test if you wish. While you wait, please practice safe sex using a latex condom.

  54. Repost:just want to clarify the question if the who is asking this:

    Just last week she told she was a healthy Hepatitis B carrier and not infectious to others. I freaked out and went to my doctor for test , all my 6 results were negative, nothing positive.
    So why did’nt I get infected? I thought even healthy inactive carrier were in infectious forever.
    I never had the vaccine, I will tomorrow though.
    She found out she had chronic hepatitis b when she was 6 years old and took 3 months of medicine and now she is 26 and say she is none infectious healhty hepatitis carrier. We had oral and stuff like normal lovers have. Why did’nt I get sick?

    1. She may very well be in the inactive phase of the virus with a very low or undetectable viral load. Most likely she would not transmit if that were the case,but you cannot say she is completely risk free, since there is no way to know if there are changes without regular blood work. Please start the vaccine series ASAP. Wait one month after a shot of the vaccine if you are planning to repeat testing since you could get a false positive test. Please encourage your partner to see a liver specialist to be sure she is getting regular monitoring. Try not to panic, but do get vaccinated.

  55. i heard a lot of stories that inactive carrier can’t pass hep b to other person because its inactive.is it true?

    1. If there is no viral load then there will not be transmission, but there is more to consider – sensitively of the test, timing of test etc. One cannot say it is totally risk free if there is an exchange of infected body fluids, but certainly a very low or undetectable viral load makes it very, very unlikely. Also any exchange of blood increases the risk – even trace amounts. HBV is vaccine preventable so be sure you get protected by completing the 3 shot series.

  56. Thank u doc. You lessen my worries. I am always checking this site to read your respond. How about during the incubation period, window period doc, is there a possibility that even during this time my hbsag is negative but later in after this period my hbsag will turn it positive? When we say incubation period that’s the time when the virus enters your body without detecting it in the blood right? I doubt, I might be in the incubation period and later I might have positive hbsag result after a month.

    1. The incubation period refers to the time before symptoms from the viral infection may occur. The window period is the time a person will not test positive even if they may have been infected. For HBV it is 4-6 weeks. Please get the first shot of the 3 shot hepatitis B vaccine and retest 4-6 weeks later before getting the 2nd shot.

    1. SGPT has nothing to do with how infectious someone is. Knowing if the person is HBeAg positive or not and the viral load indicates how infectious a person is. Normal SGPT levels for men are 30 Iu/mL or less and 19 IU/mL or less for women. His is elevated, but there can be other reasons for the elevation including lifestyle choices. Encourage your partner to talk to the liver specialist.

  57. So it means to say in my case that I might still on the stage of window period? Even my last test is negative. I can still be positive later? We are having sexual contact for about two months already and our last contact was last February 18. I’m worried because I might have a false result only since it’s still my window period. Is it enough to get hbsag result test only to detect hepa b virus ? Or do I need to get the anti-hbs, hbseg and the like ? I’m asking it’s because it’s quit expensive to get each test. Thank u for your patience on answering question. God bless doc.

    1. Once again, I suggest you get vaccinated to protect you. The window period is 4 to 6 weeks. Please get the first shot of the vaccine, wait ONE month, and repeat the surface antigen test. Then get the 2nd shot of the series. Complete the series and you will be protected!

    1. Incubation period is up to 6 months, but 70% of those newly infected have no notable symptoms. The window period is 4-6 weeks.

  58. Thank u doc. Do u have also an idea about HIV doc? My question is what is the early symtoms of HIV 1 month after you are infected? I have a yeast infection before. I am afraid beacause I had read an article that said, one of the symtom is the yeast infection.

    1. HBF is solely focused on the hepatitis B. I would encourage you to get additional testing if you have concerns.

  59. Another I have a quiet far out question. Doc how will I know if am capable of bearing a child. I am 27 years old. since I have yeast infection before. My doctor said before that if a woman experienced yeast infection she might not get pregnant. I want to have a child someday. Thank u doc.

  60. Doc, may I know how much is usual price of the vaccine in peso? May I also know what country are u located doc? Just for reference.

    1. I can’t say about the price of the vaccine since it would depend on where you live, programs available etc. Keep in mind that the HBV vaccine is a 3 shot series. Shot 1 followed in one month by shot 2 and shot 3 followed in 4 months after shot 2 and 6 months after shot 1.

  61. pls doc, just got my hep b profile results. I tested+ since 2011. I was on lamivudine and sometime my doc said i needed antibodies, and sio was made to take injection for 16wks.bi have just received my results here are due details:
    HBcAb +
    HBcIgM –
    HBsAg +
    HBsAg value 599.95 IU/ML
    HBsAb –
    surface An value 0.00 mIU/ml
    HBeAg –
    HBeAb +.
    my doc has advised me not to take any medication until I see him with this result.
    what should I do. I fear and cannot focus on my work and education. I quited my job and now want to do away with a planned further education. pls I need your help. thanks so much.

    1. Please try to relax. Did your doctor run your viral load (HBV DNA) or your ALT/AST (SGPT/SGOT)? These results would be helpful to know. Hopefully your antiviral (lamivduine) is controlling your viral load, but I cannot say for sure based on the above results which basically tell me that you have chronic HBV and that you are HBeAg negative. Still I ask you not to worry and discuss your results with your doctor.

  62. Doc, is there a possibility or chances that the chronic carrier cannot pass the virus to the one who is not infected during sexual intercourse and the like? If yes, what are those case?

  63. Doc, I’m sorry for keep on asking…I will be praying to God to bless the people behind this site. Doc, will the hepa virus stay alive on the things I mean all tangiable things. ? If yes, how many days? How to kill the virus on the things?

    1. Michelle, you really need to get vaccinated to be sure you are protected. HBV stays alive on surfaces for a week. It can be killed with a bleach solution – (fresh) 1 part bleach to 9 parts water. Take a look at this blog I wrote: http://hepbblog.org/?p=4193

  64. Dear Doctor.

    Please advise on what do you think of my blood test results.

    All liver enzyme panel tests are within normal range.

    1. HepB S Antibody is 0.27 mIU/ml today (it was 4.2 mIU/mL 2 months before)
    2. HepBCore Antibody IgM is negative
    3. HepBCore Antibody total is positive
    4. HBsAg is negative,
    5. HepB e Antigen is negative,
    6. HepB e antibody (“low titer of HepB e antibody is present – we recommend a repeat on fresh specimen”)

    I am confused somewhat doctor. Please advise. Thank you for this website and your presence doctor.

    1. Looks like you are chronically infected (HBc IgM negative). You appear to be in the inactive phase of the virus since you are HBeAg negative. It’s possible you recently seroconverted since your e antibody level is low. There are times where the e antigen/antibody pair will “flip-flop”. Be sure you see a liver specialist to learn more. You may want to discuss having a viral load test if that is possible. I am not a doctor, and it is always best to confirm with your doctor who knows you best.

  65. I am also quiet confused of Alex post. Why he has a chronic hepa b if his hbsag is negative?

    1. the questions are not threaded, so I don’t recall the situation with Alex. however, it is possible to have a surface mutation or occult infection if the person is HBsAg negative and has a viral load.

  66. Dear Doctor,

    Good Day to you Doctor..Doctor…last 2 years ago my anti-hbs was high it was above 100..i am a nurse and been working abroad for 2 years also..lately my anti hbs was below 5..it is the only test ive undergone so far due to financial constraint.. i fell tired after doing a small task like pushing the patient on a wheelchair.. my husband was diagnosed of having hepa b when he was in college but possibly he acquired it from he’s parents since all of siblings have hepa b.. months prior to anti hbs tested 2 years ago which revealed above 100 or positive i had a miscarraige… i had my hepa b vaccination when i was in college but was not able to take the booster dose..Please help me doctor…I’m depreesed right now..I might lose my job…Thank you so much…

    1. Since you generated immunity and know your anti-HBs titer was over 100 then you should be fine since you had confirmed immunity at one time. In the U.S. a booster shot after successful completion of the series is not suggested – especially if you know you generated immunity and you know you completed the series. Please don’t be depressed, maybe you are worrying needlessly, though if you are not feeling well, you should see your doctor. please know that I a not a doctor, but I know my HBV and I do care! I am sorry to hear of your husband’s HBV. If possible it would be good for him to be seen by a doctor with experience treating HBV so he can be monitored.

  67. So it means to say mam/sir that it is not a guarantee that if u have hbsag negative you don’t have the virus ? It is also possible that even u have hbsag negative there are cases that u have the virus.

    1. Yes. there is such a thing as an occult infection or a surface mutation. Typically a person is then HBsAg negative, HBsAb positive,HBcAb positive, and has a viral load, though typically lower. Talk to your doctor if you have specific concerns.

  68. Hello Dr,
    Very informative site and very helpful.
    Recently my Dad has been diagnosed with HCC (Liver cancer stage-4) and visited him in chennai. His doctors mentioned to me that it was due to years of chronic HBV infection which he probably would have got it hereditary or acquired. He also advised myself to get tested. That was the 1st time I heard about the term Hepatitis B. Later we realized that my Dad’s brother (my uncle) also died of liver infection + cirrhosis. Dr theorized that also a likely case of chronic HBV.
    I did my test and shocked to see “positive” in some of the items. I’m going to see a liver specialist next week. Here are my reports, please advise me on my situation:

    HBV Real-Time PCR, Quant
    HBV IU/ml = 50 IU/ml
    log10 HBV IU/ml = 1.699 log10 IU/ml

    Hep B Surface Ab:
    Hep B Surface Ab Qual, Non-reactive

    HBsAg Screen: Positive Abnormal

    Hep Be Ag: Negative

    Hep Be Ab: Positive Abnormal

    Hep C RNA Test: Negative

    PLEASE HELP ME. DO I ALSO HAVE CHRONIC HEPATITIS B?

    IM DEPRESSED NOW. PLEASE ADVISE.

    1. I am very sorry to hear of your father’s HCC diagnosis as a result of his chronic HBV infection and that you and your siblings are also infected with HBV. HBV is not hereditary, but it appears to run in families. HBV is often transmitted from an HBV positive mother to her children if there is no birth prophylaxis and it is also not uncommon for unvaccinated close, household or family members to be infected over time due to inadvertent exposure as a result of coming into contact with infected blood and body fluids in the home such as razors, toothbrushes or anything with even trace amounts of blood on them.

      I know this is very distressing to you, though it would appear that you are likely chronically infected. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months, but looking at your family history and your test results, it is likely that you are chronically infected, but of course you will need to confirm this with your liver specialist. You would appear to be in the inactive phase of the virus since you are HBeag negative with a low viral load. You do not note your liver enzymes or other liver function tests, but I am assuming they are normal. Please confirm with your doctor.

      Please don’t be depressed. No one wants to have a chronic illness like HBV, but many are living long, full lives. Please be sure you set up a regular monitoring schedule with your liver specialist and since there is a history of liver cancer in your family, please discuss liver cancer surveillance with your liver specialist and healthy life style habits you should adopt to keep your liver in top shape. Please try not to panic. Take it one step at a time and try not to worry too much. talk to your doctor. and once again I am sorry about your dad’s HCC diagnosis and your discovery of your HBV diagnosis.

  69. What test should I take to determine if I have an occult infection or a surface mutation? Is this still contagious?

    1. My best advice is to see a liver specialist to discuss your concerns. That way you are sure the correct testing is done based on your risk factors. Occult infections are not typically very infectious since the viral loads are low, but once again, I encourage you to speak with a liver specialist.

  70. hi. could you help me interpret this result below? or is this possible that only HBeAB is positive? thank you
    Hep. B Core Ab. Negative
    HBsAb. Negative
    HBsAg. Negative
    HBeAB. Positive
    HBeAg. Negative

  71. hi doctor
    would you please help me to interpret this result
    I have hepatitis B positive since 2005 and I did the HBV markers and the result was as follow
    HBeAg= Negative
    HBeAb=Positive
    HBcAb=POSITIVE
    HBsAb=NEGATIVE
    HBsAg=positive
    HBV DNA = 696 IU/ml was positive
    and all my liver function test with in the normal rang
    then in 2011 I did HBV DNA by PCR and the result was not detected
    and still my liver function test value with in the normal update.
    I am seeking Nowadays to get a graduate degree from USA and I am a fried they don`t accept an overseas student with Hepatitis b positive or getting Visa
    please help me
    thanks

    1. So it looks like you have chronic HBV and that you are in the inactive/less active phase of the virus since you are HBeAg negative and your viral load is detectable, but not too high, and your liver enzymes are within normal ranges (<30 IU/L for men < 19 IU/L for women). This is a good place to be. I see no reason you would not be able to study in the U.S. because of your chronic HBV. There is no screening for HBV in order to get a student visa, though vaccination may be required for on campus housing.

  72. APRIL 9, 2015
    Anti Hbeag – non reactive CMIA
    hbeag – non reactive CMIA
    HBSAG with titer – 0.28 non reactive CMIA
    ALT – 107.38

    AUGUST 11, 2014
    HBSAG WITH TITER (ELISA) reactive
    HBSAG screening – non reactive
    Anti hbeag – reactive
    Hbeag – non reactive

    Can you interpret my present laboratory results? Im confused

    1. It looks like you had an HBV infection in August 2014, but now you no longer are infected. That would mean that you likely had an acute or new HBV infection in Aug 2014 and you were able to get rid of it on your own. Greater than 90% of healthy adults will clear a new, acute HBV infection with out the need for any medication. However, those that are infected at birth or during early childhood tend to remain infected (90% or more of babies newly infected and 30-50% of young children).

      I would ask your doctor about your elevated ALT of 107. Sometimes it takes some time for the ALT to come down, but you just want to check and make sure that it normalizes and that there is not something else liver related going on.

  73. hi doctor
    I appreciate your help in advance,but I have two other questions
    first, my HVB by PCR was not detected in 2011,can the result change.
    second, my HBsAg is positive and when I did the PCR test I expect my HBsAg test will be negative. can it change to negative result although the liver function test normal since 2005
    thanks

  74. Hello,
    First of all, this is a great blog you have. Helpful and informative.
    A relation of mine has chronic HBV, since it was only discovered six years ago.
    Three days ago, he had his liver profiled and HBV DNA VIRAL load and the following is the result:
    SGPT: 8 u/l,
    ALK. Phosphate: 33.1 u/l,
    SGCT: 13 u/l,
    HCV: negative,
    HBsAg: positive,
    HBsAb: negative,
    HBeAg: negative,
    HBeAb: positive,
    HBcAb: positive.
    Viral load result: below detectable level (genesig Q16 real time PCR).
    Doctor, what does all this mean?

    1. Thank you. Sounds like your relative is in the inactive phase of the virus since he is HBeAg negative, HBeAb positive, has an undetectable viral load and ALT/AST within normal ranges (< 30 IU/L for men and < 19 Iu/L for women). This is a good place to be. you don't mention his age, but he should continue with regular monitoring of his HBV and liver health with bi-annual or annual blood work and if over the age of 40 or with any family history of liver cancer, he should get surveillance for liver cancer at that time as well. Encourage him to adopt healthy lifestyles - No drinking alcohol, avoiding smoking and environmental toxins and maintaining a healthy weight through a well balanced diet and regular exercise.

  75. April 2014
    HBsAg – reactive
    HBeAg – non reactive
    Anti-Hbe – non reactive
    Ultrasound – normal
    HBV DNA – 3,608 IU/ml
    ALT – 24

    April 2015
    HBsAg – reactive
    HBeAg – non reactive
    Anti-Hbe – reactive
    Ultrasound – normal sized mild fatty
    HBV DNA – 5,189 IU/ml
    ALT – 17

    I wanted to know your opinion about my status from those comparison. My HBV DNA is quite elevated does that mean I’m active carrier now? Should I benefit from the treatment now? I also applied for job abroad the HR told me they will consider if I’m inactive carrier so I really hope I’m still inactive 🙁 and i wonder how did my Anti-Hbe became positive now.

    I will wait for your reply. Thank you very much, as always you are very helpful to people like me.

    1. So it looks like you are HBeAg negative, with an elevated HBV DNA level – though not too high, but your ALT is very much within normal limits. Normal ALT is 19 IU/L or less for women. Do you have any evidence at all of liver damage? Looking at the guidelines a liver biopsy might be recommended though less invasive methods are being used to find evidence of liver disease. Do you have access to fibroscan? You’re sort of in a gray area and frankly treatment would vary with the liver specialist. If you look at a comparison of the guidelines, you would see that without evidence of liver damage and normal ALT you would not be recommended for treatment. However, some specialists might consider it based on an apparent upward trend in the viral load. It just depends. Perhaps you can talk to your liver specialist. Treatment with antivirals is a commitment so you want to you want to consider the pros and cons. Personally I would talk to the liver specialist and look at tightening up your monitoring schedule for at least 6 months – every 3 months, to see if you ALT elevates and/or if your viral load consistently elevates. I would also ask for some sort of means to evaluate any possible liver damage. If nothing else, look at the APRI ratio discussed in the new WHO guidelines. Here are guidelines comparing AASDL, EASL and APASL http://www.natap.org/2014/HBV/011614_01.htm and you can also look at the WHO guidelines. http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/154590/1/9789241549059_eng.pdf?ua=1&ua=1 Read them and discuss with your liver specialist. Hope this helps.

  76. What about the result of my anti hbeag? Was it supposed to be reactive? To rule out im no longer infected with HBV? Thanks a lot!

    1. Sometimes titers will wane. that or a possibly lab error. Did you ever your viral load run? Please include all info if you post again. The dashboard does not thread any of the comments and it can be tough to find the original post

  77. I was diagnosed of hbsag positive in 2011. Since then, my AST, ALT And CBC are all within norman range. Hbeag is also non reactive. However, in December, a doctor mistaken my situation and prescribed me lamivudine. I had taken it for two months when I decide to go and see a dr again. Being a different dr, he objected and order me to do another hbeag test which turns out non reactive. Bilirubin and other tests were within normal range. He asked me to stop taking lamivudine. It’s been two months now but recently I discover a bulge in my stomach and breast. I went back to the doctor and all the CBCs (NEUT=67, EOSIN=02, LYMPH=31, CLOTTING TIME=3mins 85sec, WBC=5.1×10 and PCV=44%) were within normal range. I am yet to see him with the result till monday. How can you interprete my incidence.

    1. I would discuss some sort of imaging study with your doctor to investigate any bulge in your stomach and breast. He may be able to learn something during a physical exam, but if not an imaging study certainly sounds appropriate. Since you were mistakenly prescribed lamivudne and stopped, you might discuss having your ALT and viral load checked to be sure there was not a flare from abruptly stopping the medication. I wouldn’t think there would be a bulge, but I think you will need to figure that out with your doctor. Be sure to continue with regular monitoring of your HBV and the function of your liver.

  78. Hi, I was waiting for a reply then when I checked again somehow my message was gone. Anyways, here’s my result;

    April 2014
    HbsAg – reactive
    HbeAg – non reactive
    Anti-Hbe – non reactive
    HBV DNA – 3,600 IU/ml
    Ultrasound – normal
    ALT – 24

    April 2015
    HBsAg – reactive
    HBeAg – non reactive
    Anti-Hbe – reactive
    HBV DNA – 5,189 IU/ml
    Ultrasound – normal size mild fatty
    ALT – 17

    I’m getting worried because my HBV is elevated 🙁 should I benefit from treatment now? I haven’t get back to my doctor yet as he is on leave and I just got the results.. And is it a good thing that my Anti-Hbe is reactive coz before it was non reactive.. I was trying to apply abroad and they will only consider me if they’re sure that I’m inactive, does the above result tells I’m “active carrier” now? I’m so scared, I’m 24 now and I still have so many dreams that I want to fulfill. If ever I start the treatment would it hinder me from working? Will it make me sick or will rather help me? Hope you could answer all my questions. Thank you very much!

    1. My previous response still stands, however, I did miss the notation about mild fatty liver disease. This might prompt some to consider treatment earlier just because you have more than one thing going on in your liver. Fatty liver is new – no real guidelines for treatment and monitoring and no studies on the impact with those with other liver diseases like viral hepatitis, though it would make sense to try to avoid multiple issues with the liver. Having a discussion with your doctor is important. Do your homework and be prepared to take an active role in the discussion. I’m not saying you have to get treatment, but it is worth the discussion. Take care with your diet, but really your ALT does not indicate any obvious impact on your liver thus far. Keep it that way and be sure to take care with your diet and exercise daily – even if it’s 30 to 60 minutes of brisk walking every day. I see that you’re young. Don’t let this squash your dreams. Take control as best you can. Empower yourself with healthy lifestyle choices and learn more about what is going on with your HBV and fatty liver. Do you have a family history of liver disease? This would go into the equation about whether or not to treat. Taking an antiviral is a commitment. You must take it every day and it can be expensive for those without insurance or programs to help with the expense. However, taking an antiviral is not an issue. It controls and manages HBV. One day there will be a functional cure for HBV, but until that time, you want to do all that you can to keep your liver healthy. It will not make you sick, there are rarely side effects. You do require closer monitoring – probably every 3 months initially and then bi-annually, but really that is it. Sorry I missed the fatty liver on the other response. Don’t panic, but look at some of the information I sent you. talk to your doctor about your situation. Follow us on Facebook as I update it everyday with articles on HBV, liver disease, healthy eating tips Friday, and info on fatty liver as well – though more often on the liver cancer connect Facebook page. Don’t be afraid to live your life to the fullest. No one wants to have this disease, but you do so you learn more, make adjustments and move forward with your life! 🙂

  79. hi,
    i am really confused about my tests results, some doctors says i have acute hbv and some says i have chronic hbv but here are my test results.
    hbs ag positive
    hbs ab negative
    Hbe ag positive
    Hbe ab negative
    Hbc ab positive
    please advise me my situation

    1. There is no way to know for sure at this point, but if a doctor has experience with patients with hepatitis B he likely has an idea of whether or not it is an acute or chronic infection. You do not mention if you have symptoms, or why you went for testings, or anything about you liver enzymes (ALT/AST) or liver function tests, but they also help a doctor determine if it is “likely” an acute or chronic infection. However, if you continue to test HBsAg positive for 6 months then this would be considered a chronic infection. You could ask your doctor to run an anti-hcb IgM test, but this is not always conclusive. take care of your liver while you wait and take care to not transmit HBV to others.

    1. Never mind what I said previously. I just saw this comment as well. Sounds like you have tested HBsAg positive for longer than 6 months, and if that is the case then you have a chronic infection and would benefit from seeing a liver specialist to learn more. Just check to be sure you are HBsAg positive and not HBsAb positive. These mean very different things.

  80. Hello,
    27 years old here. Just got my hep b panel test results today, I don’t think I ever got tested positive for the antigen before in my life (and I got tested few times before).
    I also believe I got vaccinated for it when I was in elemantry school.

    Test Name
    HEPATITIS PANEL, ACUTE W/ REFLEX TO CONFIRMATION

    HEPATITIS A IGM NON-REACTIVE

    HEPATITIS B SURFACE
    ANTIGEN W/ REFL CONFIRM
    HEPATITIS B SURFACE
    ANTIGEN REACTIVE

    HEPATITIS B CORE ANTIBODY
    ANTIBODY (IGM) NON-REACTIVE

    HEPATATIS C ANTIBODY NON-REACTIVE
    SIGNAL TO CUT-OFF 0.07

    Does this test means I’m hep b positive? Is there a way to tell if it’s acute or chronic condition (What additional tests should I ask my doc to take)? Also, if I did contract it, how is that possible if I got a vaccination for it.

    Also, am I sexually contagious right now? Or is it only when you become chronic that you become hep b contagious?

    Thanks a lot for your help!

    1. Your test results indicates that you currently have a hepatitis B infection and it appears that it is a chronic HBV infection since you are HBcAb IgM negative,which indicates a chronic infection.

      I’m not sure what to say about previous testing and or possible vaccination. You can try to confirm by reviewing your vaccination records or previous lab work, though it is possible that if you were vaccinated years ago without having a titer test run, that you are actually infected with HBV prior to vaccination. The vaccine does not work for those already infected prior to vaccination. I would suggest that you see a liver specialist so you can get more specific testing to confirm

  81. Sir I have hbv 29127 & log value 5.23 is there hbv for me and is there means what is treatment

    1. I would encourage you to talk to your liver specialist about all of your results – HBeAg pos or neg, ALT and AST within normal ranges (30 or less for men or 19 or less for women)? Your age and family history along with any imaging studies or fibroscan et. to also help determine if you are a good candidate for treatment.

  82. Dear Dr,

    My 20-year-old boyfriend has recently been diagnosed with hepatitis b. The doctor believes it’s chronic and according to the blood tests the virus seems to be inactive (HBeAg is negative, HBeAb is positive with a ratio of 0.01 and the viral load is 865 IU/mL (2.94 log). He’s not been given any treatment (the doctor believes that it’s not necessary at the moment, considering his young age and the fact that the virus is inactive), but I was just wondering if there is any non-invasive treatment option for someone like him. As for me, I have been vaccinated against HBV as a baby, and I recently tested negative to the virus.

    Thank you so much for any help you may provide.

    1. Sorry to hear of your boyfriends chronic HBV infection. Glad to hear he is in the inactive phase. I would agree that treatment would likely not be recommended at this time with today’s currently available treatments. In the future (next few years), hopefully there will be a functional or complete cure for chronic HBV. Please be sure your boyfriend continues with regular monitoring in case there are changes to his HBV or the health of his liver. Encourage him to adopt healthy lifestyle choices including NOT drinking alcohol, taking care with all medications and supplants and maintaining a healthy weight by eating a well balanced diet and getting regular exercise.

  83. Good day! What is the difference between quantitative and qualitative test of hepa b? Which is the first test to determine if u have infection?

    1. Qualitative returns positive/negative or reactive/non-reactive where as quantitative will return a number. For many of the serologies a qualitative test is perfectly fine such as HBsAg, HBeAg, HBeAb. However, sometimes a HBsAg titer is helpful and an anti-HBs titer determines immunity and the HBV DNA test is almost always best as a quantitative test. for your scenario, there is no reason for anything other than qualitative testing. Ask for a hepatitis B panel which returns HBsAg, HBcAb, HBsAb. qualitative tests are just fine.

  84. My test
    Hbsag pos
    Hbsab neg
    Hbeag neg
    Hbeab pos
    Hbcab pos

    Pls doctor is it right to start taken drugs to prevent it from getting worse. Moreover my doctor gave me liver cap capsule to take which I have been taken for 3days now. My liver function test shows OK. Pls advice me

    1. do you know if this is an acute (new) or chronic infection? A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. If this is an acute (new) infection, then it is very unlikely that you would require treatment. The problem is this may seem new to you, but you may have had it for many, many years. So first before considering medication, talk to your doctor to confirm if this is a chronic infection. Even then your doctor may wish to learn more. Ask him about your liver enzymes (ALT/AST) and your liver function tests. I don’t know if you are able to get a viral load test, but you may wish to do this if you know for sure if this is a chronic infection. Once you have all the information, you and your liver specialist can look at all of the data an determine if you are a good candidate for treatment. It’s important to understand that not everyone with chronic HBV needs treatment, but everyone needs monitoring to be sure there are no changes to your HBV or the health of your liver over time. You also want to be sure to take care of the health of your liver by NOT drinking alcohol, avoiding smoking and environmental toxins and maintaining a healthy weight through a well balanced diet and regular exercise. Consider looking at some of the guidelines. The capsule you are taking is likely supportive of the liver and not medicine to stop the virus from replicating.

  85. My test last week indicated the following results:

    Test Patient Count Cut off Value Remarks

    HBsAg Confirmatory 0.055 0.078 nonreactive
    Anti-HBs 0.129 0.141 nonreactive
    HBeAg 0.035 0.063 nonreactive
    Anti-HBe (reverse method) 1.38 0.427 nonreactive
    Anti-Hbc IgM 0.027 0.059 nonreactive
    Anti-HBc IgG (reverse method) 0.845 0.437 nonreactive

    This result was surprisingly pleasant news to me because over 20 years ago I was devastated when I tested positive reactive on a surface antigen during a screening test on my job. My question is – does this current test result has any indication of my past positive result? I thought my previous (+) result is a lifetime burden, so why am I non reactive this time after over 20 years? Please, I am unfamiliar with all these number, so kindly explain. Can I now have Hep B vaccination with these nonreactive results? I am a type 2 diabetic for about 15 years now and also have fatty liver. My SGPT/ALT result is 96.7 (normal values 0.0 – 45.0 and SGOT/AST of 46.4 (normal values 0.0 – 35.0

    Thank you very much

    1. No, this does not indicate any sort of current or past infection – no immunity at all. Do you think your tests were false 20 years ago? I don’t see any reason not to be vaccinated to protect, since I wonder if there was an error all those years ago? The vaccine is recommended for those with diabetes, and frankly you don’t want the combination of HBV and fatty liver, so it sounds like a good idea. Your ALT is elevated since it should be 30 or below, but perhaps it’s the result of fatty liver or other issues, or medications resulting in an elevation. It certainly does not appear to be related to HBV. The only other test you could consider is a viral load test. You can certainly discuss with your liver specialist.

    1. I have responded. Keep in mind I will be unable to answer until after June 8th as I will be away.

  86. It is a tremendous relief for me knowing that you believe it must be a false result. That was my contention to my doctor but he denied my request for another test, instead he tried to alleviate my anxiety that my case is asymptomatic and that is very common for those of Asian descent like me to get positive result. In the meanwhile I was tortured all these years with a lot of fears and scruples, shame and guilt -endless and innumerable – and I even suspect I might have contracted it from an airport x-ray screening personnel who took out my electric shaver and tried it on his face! Now, fully freed from all those torturous burden, it’s one great reason to celebrate every minute of my remaining years – as if a miracle just happened to me! Thanks a lot to your assistance.

    1. I believe it is a false positive, based on the information you posted, or perhaps just information that was mis-interpeted in the past? However, it would be best to confirm with a liver specialist. Was this past “positive” result interpreted by a liver specialist? HBV can be a very tricky virus. That is my only concern. Are you in the U.S.?

  87. Hi thanks for your response earlier, I got some additional test results, and was wondering if you could please comment and advice if treatment is needed in this case:

    ast 18 (ref range: 10-30 u/l)
    alt 19 (ref range: 6-29 u/l)
    vit d, 25-oh, total: 28 (ref range: 30-100 ng/ml)
    pth intact 35 (ref range: 14-64 pg/ml)
    hbsag positive
    hbsab negative
    hbcab positive
    hbeag negative
    hbeab positive
    hbv dna 1311 ui/ml
    hbsag count ??? ui/ml (can’t do the test in the US, but I’m guessing it’s going to be more than hbv dna?)
    alpha fetoprotein tumor marker 2.0 (ref range: <6.1 ng/ml)
    liver fibrotest score: 0.29 (F1) minimal fibrosis
    acti test (assesses activity (inflammation in chb)): score 0.05 (A0) no activity.
    hep a ab negative (should I get vaccinated?)
    hep d co-infection negative
    Ultrasound: No significant abnormality is identified.
    tests pending: hbv genotype

    Also, do you happen to have any liver specialists to recommend in LA area?
    And do you know where the hbsag quantity test can be done in the US? I heard a low level of it can be a good candidate for interferon treatment in order to seroconvert.

    Thanks!

    1. The Hepatitis B Foundation maintains a Directory of Liver Specialists for the U.S. and other countries. You will find our directory of liver specialists here: http://www.hepb.org/resources/liver_specialist_directory.htm. Enter California and you can view liver specialists available in the LA area. Any liver specialist will be able to run a quantitative HBsAg test, though your ALT is within range at this time (<30 for men and 19 or < for women) so you many not be a good candidate for an immune modulator at this time, but best to confirm with a liver specialist. It looks as though you have not had hepatitis A, so you would benefit from vaccination to protect.

  88. Thanks for your earlier assistance. Kindly let me direct to this inquiry to you since I don’t have a medical insurance and it will cost me a lot to see a Hepatologist and undergo a viral load test: Why would I need a viral load test? Can I proceed with a Hep B vaccination without a viral load test in my case? Or is it safer or better to get first the viral load test before the viral load test? (never mind the monetary cost on my part as I don’t want a regret later on). Thanks again.

    1. As I mentioned, HBV can be very tricky, and not all results are black and white. For example, a person that has resolved a previous HBV infection will typically test HBcAb positive and HBsAb positive. However, there are times where these wane – it’s not the norm, but sometimes it does happen. That is where the advice of a liver specialist would be critical since they take in the patient as a whole – blood work, physical exam, family history etc. Based on what you shared with me, there is not evidence base on that data, but best to confirm if you are able.

  89. correction on capital case:
    Thanks for your earlier assistance. Kindly let me direct to this inquiry to you since I don’t have a medical insurance and it will cost me a lot to see a Hepatologist and undergo a viral load test: Why would I need a viral load test? Can I proceed with a Hep B vaccination without a viral load test in my case? Or is it safer or better to get first the viral load test BEFORE THE VACCINATION? (never mind the monetary cost on my part as I don’t want a regret later on). Thanks again.

    1. It would be good to truly confirm with a liver specialist and put this to rest once and for all. That would be my advice, and if I were in your situation, that is what I would do.

  90. Sir my sister was diagnosed as hbsag +ve few days back and after a couple of more tests the result is Igm anti Hbc -ve and Hbeag/anti Hbeag -ve. Please help me understand the stage of infection.

    1. Thank you for your post. I’m also confused by her test results. If I understand she has tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Did she test positive for the hepatitis B core antibody (HBc-ve) and did she test positive for either HBeAg or the HBeAg antibody? Was she recently infected? It may be advisable to have the tests re-run in a few weeks in the event she is in the early phase of infection. Is it possible she was immunized recently? Thank you

  91. i was tested positive to hepatitis b , so i went to the doctor and he asked me to go for several test which i did… these are my result . please tell me what you think.
    bilirubin (total).. 1.23 (range 0 – 1)
    bilirubin (direct) 0.13 (range 0 – 0.6)
    bilirubin (indirect) 1.1 (range 0.1 – 1)
    SGOT(AST) 34.5 (range 5 -40)
    SGPT(ALT)31 (range 7-45)
    Alkaline phosphate 47 (range 40 -129)
    GGT 60.3 (range 8-78)
    total protein 7.3 (range 6.3 – 8.6)
    albumin 4.8 (range 3.7 – 5.6)
    glubolin 2.5 (range 1.8 – 3.6)
    A/G Ration 1.92 (range 1.1 – 2.2)
    HBsAg 13.5 positive
    anti HBsAg 1.35 negative
    anti HBcAg 0.23 positive
    anti HBcAg-igM 0.0 negative
    HBeAg o.o negative
    anti HBeAg 0.11 positive
    non replicating virus.

    1. Hello, It appears you have an inactive infection from what I can tell from your results. It appears you are not suffering any liver damage given your liver enzyme levels. I don’t see a viral load (HBV DNA) measurement but the fact you are HBeAg-negative and have normal liver enzymes shows well. The bottom phrase, “non replicating virus” is a good assessment of your condition. Be sure to continue to be tested regularly and take precautions because you can still spread the infection even if your infection is “inactive.”

  92. hi
    thanks for running such informative blog,
    i am 40 years male, during taking Ayurveda treatment of psoriasis in one of hospital i developed red patches on entire body and yellowish urine and yellowish eye thereafter taken anti alergic medicine and red patches gone doctor suggested hep B test and my result as follows

    HBsAg quantitative-2820
    HBV DNA quantitative-14000 iu/ml
    HBA1c- 5.2 /102.54 (normal range)
    Anti HAV igm-0.47 non reactive
    Anti HBCore Igm-2.94 reactive
    HbeAg-10.45-Reactive
    Anti Hbe-1.81 Non reactive
    Anti HevIgm-Non reactive
    AFP-13.01
    ANA-Negative
    Bilirubin-2.8/1.3/1.50
    AST-139
    ALT-329
    Alk phosphate-104
    GGT-80
    total protein- 8.2
    fibroscan-7.2kPa
    my ultrasound report is normal
    please inter prate my test result, my test result need medication ? am i in acute or chronic stage?

    1. Hello, You have chronic hepatitis B. When you have this infection and are treated with an immune-suppressing drug for psoriasis, your immune system weakens and it no longer can keep your hepatitis B infection under control. In your case, it appears that you experienced liver damage from the drug. Your ALT level reached 329 (normal is under 40 or 50), which means you are experiencing liver damage.
      I cannot say if this is acute or chronic, it will be important for you to be retested in the next few weeks. But most important, you should stop taking the psoriasis drug as it is harming your liver and allowing your hepatitis B infection to “flare.”
      Currently, before doctors prescribe any immune-suppressing drugs to patients, they are supposed to test them for hepatitis B. If they are infected, they should be treated with antivirals to stop the virus from reproducing while they are taking immune-suppressing drugs. Thank you and good luck.

  93. I am in the Philippines now. I went in for a blood test as a routine follow up for my diabetes type 2 when I chanced upon Hep B on the checklist. Out of curiosity I included it. That was last February; the result that came has only a single statement entry “non-reactive” and no numbers. Three months later on a similar diabetes 2 blood test, I had the Hep B repeated, this time for s higher fee with all those numbers and several “non-reactive” results.

    The original test was done in the US back in 1992 when I tested positive and there was no other follow up nor further confirmation with a liver specialist as my doctor dismissed my contention. If ever I could have contracted Hep B for sure, it could have happened in 2 separate single events back in 1982, a 10 years span. That’s why I lived with an unresolved puzzle all these years. Thanks a lot for all your great assistance.

  94. can a woman living with chronic hepatitis B give birth without infecting the baby.. what is the possibility that the baby wont be infected . thanks

    1. Hello Karen, Absolutely you can have children without infecting them–as long as they are vaccinated within 12 hours of birth with the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine and are given an injection of HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) also at birth. If that happens, and your baby gets the next two doses of vaccine (the second is administered 30 days after the birth dose and the third is given six months after the birth dose), then your baby has a 95% chance of NOT getting infected.
      If a woman has a very high viral load (the amount of HBV DNA in her blood) and tests positive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) then there is a small chance (3-5%) the baby will become infected, despite vaccination and HBIG treatment. If you have a high viral load (exceeding 1 million copies per milliliter — or 50 million international units per milliliter) and are treated with antivirals during your pregnancy, the risk that your baby will be infected drops to almost zero.
      Recent studies have found that antiviral drugs, which stop the virus from reproducing, are safe for both mother and child. These drugs, administered in a daily pill, were used for decades in HIV-infected women to lower their viral load and have been found to cause no birth defects or side effects to mothers. Hope this helps. If you’re pregnant or thinking of starting a family, it’s a good idea to see a liver specialist who can help you and make sure your liver stays healthy during your pregnancy. Good luck.

  95. What do this results mean?
    hep. B surface Antibody U/L= < 3= negative
    hep. B surface index < 1 index = H 1.07 = H Positive
    hep. b Core AS index < 0.5 index= 0.2
    hep. b e antigeen= negative
    hep. b e antibody = negative

    Why I don't have hep. b. e. antibody?
    What does hep. B core=0.2 means?

    That you so much to answer this.

    1. Hello, Thanks for you inquiry. I will tell you what I can from your results. As you know, you tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), which means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Is this the first time you have tested positive for hepatitis B or is this your newest lab test result? If you were recently infected, in most cases after a brief or “acute” infection you will clear the infection after several months. If you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, then you have a chronic infection. You tested positive for the hepatitis B core antibody (hep. B core) because you have been exposed to the virus. The core antibody is the first antibody your immune system creates to fight the infection.
      Now to your “e” antigen question. It could be that you are in the midst of converting from being “e” positive to being “e” negative, and you don’t have enough “e” antigens or “e” antibodies to show up on the lab test. It could be a lab error also. I encourage you to talk to your doctor and get retested in six months. Then, you can see what those lab tests show. In the meantime, take care of your liver by avoiding alcohol and smoking, and eat healthy foods. During this time you should consider yourself infectious. HBV is not spread casually, but is is transmitted through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Be sure to keep cuts, bites, etc covered, practice safe sex using a condom since HBV is transmitted sexually, and keep personal hygiene items such as toothbrushes, razors, body jewelry or nail clippers (anything that might have trace amounts of blood on them) separate from others so they are not accidentally shared. Good luck.
      Please be sure you follow up with a doctor, to confirm your HBV diagnosis and status, and whether or not you have an acute or chronic infection. If you learn you have a chronic infection, please be sure to see a liver specialist – a hepatologist or gastroenterologist or other doctor with experience treating patients with chronic HBV.

  96. i am 32 years old male. I infect chronicb . In 2006 , I made blood test, indicated
    Hbs ag reactive
    Hbs ab nonreactive
    Hbe ag reactive
    Hbe ab nonreactive
    Hbc ab reactive .
    Now in June,2015
    Hbs ag reactive
    Hbs ab nonreactive
    Hbe ag nonreactive (change reactive to nonreactive?)
    Hbe ab nonreactive
    Hbc ab reactive .
    Ultrasong show liver is normal size, increased coarse echoes.
    Urea 4.2mmol
    Creatinine 71.4 umol/L
    Total bilirubin 11.8 umol/L
    Alk phosphate 64.5U/L
    ALT 35.8 U/L
    AST 31.7
    Random blood sugar 5.5mmol
    HBV DNA.QTT 251,250 IU/ml
    I. Am taking alternative medicine for six months. I will continue or stop it. Hbs ag change reactive to non reactive , why?
    I am now dangerous liver?
    Help me what should i do.

    1. Hello: I am sorry to hear of your hepatitis B infection. The change in your lab results is good news. While you are still infected with hepatitis B (you tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen – HBsAg), you do not test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg). Generally, when you are HBeAg-positive you have lots of virus in your blood and have a high viral load (HBV DNA). When you “seroconvert” and lose the “e” antigen and develop “e” antibodies, it means your immune system is fighting the infection and the amount of virus in your blood, semen and other body fluids is starting to decline.
      However, you are still infectious and must use precautions to make sure no one comes into contact with your blood and body fluids, so make sure you practice safer sex and bandage any cuts.
      Your ALT level is 35.8 u/l, which shows you are not experiencing liver damage at this time, so it appears you are healthy. However you should still see your doctor or liver specialist regularly for testing, and make sure he or she knows about any herbal supplements you are taking. Good luck.

  97. Hi! What do this results mean?
    *I had this result last March
    SGPT/ALT – 14 U/L
    Alphafetoprotein (ECLIA) – 1.03
    HBsAg w/Titer (CMIA) – 3717.56 reactive

    *Then, I took another examination just this June
    SGPT/ALT – 27 U/L
    HBeAg (CMIA) – 0.33 non-reactive
    HBsAg w/Titer (CMIA) – 3354.92 reactive

    Does my condition get better or worse?
    Thank you in advance 🙂

    1. Hello: I am going to focus on the two lab results–the SGPT/ALT and HBsAg–that appear in both test results. The amount of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) appears similar in both results. Your ALT/SGPT is a test that measures a liver enzyme (alanine aminotransferase) that increases when your liver cells are damaged. For men, healthy ALT levels are under 30 and for women healthy levels are under 19. You’ve had a small increase in SGPT/ALT from 14 to 27, but the increase is not dramatic. And many things can cause a slight increase in ALT levels, including a passing illness that is not related to hepatitis B. Because you test negative for the hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), I suspect your viral load (HBV DNA) is not too high, however that should be measured in your lab test at some point. It is a valuable indicator of your infection stage, in addition to your ALT level.
      I’m sure you know this, but remember to eat healthy foods and refrain from drinking alcohol and smoking. Keep cuts, bites, etc. covered, practice safe sex using a condom because HBV is transmitted sexually, and keep personal hygiene items such as toothbrushes, razors, body jewelry or nail clippers (anything that might have trace amounts of blood on them) separate from others so they are not accidentally shared. Good luck.

    1. Hello: No, saliva does not transmit hepatitis B. However, if you have a sore in your mouth, have bleeding gums or wear braces and engage in vigorous kissing, it may be possible to spread the virus through blood in the saliva. But in general, saliva has not been found to transmit the virus so it is safe to share food etc. Thanks.

  98. Hello,

    I just have a question. I was diagnosed with hep b 2008 I took interferone but it did not work well so the Doc changed me to Intecavir and almost two yrs. now I am undetectable blood test my Doc said to pass it on to anyone is slin but still need to be careful. What really are the chance of passing it if ever I sleep with someone with no protection? Thank you!

    1. Hello: Even though your viral load (HBV DNA) is low because of your successful antiviral treatment, you can still infect your sexual partner and you must continue to practice safe sex and use a condom. As long as you continue to test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), your blood, body fluids and semen carry the virus. As you know, the higher your viral load the more virus your blood and semen contain, and the more infectious they are. But even with a low viral load, you do not want to risk infecting your partner. Your partner should be screened and immunized for hepatitis B. About one or two months after they have received all three vaccine doses, they should get a blood test to make sure their blood has enough hepatitis B antibodies (also called titers) to protect them from infection. Only then can you practice unprotected sex without risking infecting your partner. Good luck.

  99. PLease help me to interpret these datas.
    and if possible, please reply and let me know.

    Anti HBS non reactive (2.0)
    HBeAg non reactive (.117)
    Anti Hbe reactive (.005)
    Anti Hbc reactive (.007)
    Anti HBclgM non reactive (.036).

    I will wait for your reply.
    Thank you very much in advance.

    1. Hello: I am missing the most important lab result for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). I see you test negative for hepatitis B antibodies. If you test positive (reactive) for hepatitis B surface antigen, it is good news that you test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antibody (Anti Hbe), this means that your viral load may not be high, and that your body is starting to fight the infection. One of the other important lab test results is for ALT or AST. These are liver enzymes that liver cells release when they are damaged by the infection. In men, healthy ALT levels are 30 or less, and in women ALT levels should be 19 or less. Talk to your doctor and see if there are results for those lab tests. That will provide a more complete picture of your liver health. Good luck.

  100. hbsag postive hbeab postive hbcab postive hbsab negative hbeag negative means acute or chronic it has been like 33 days since i was infected.i am confused and what did i do to remove this virus from blood

    1. Hello:
      In order to find out if you have a short-term (acute) infection or a long-term (chronic) infection, you need to have hepatitis B tests that are six months apart. If you were recently infected, it can take up to six months for the immune system to get rid of the virus. After six months, then you will know. Until then, eat healthy and do not smoke or drink alcohol. There is no cure for hepatitis B right now, but there are effective treatments to lower your viral load and protect your liver. However, keep in mind that many people can live with hepatitis B for many years and do not need treatment. Be patient and make sure you are monitored regularly by your doctor. Good luck.

  101. is it possible i have a hepb since at first i was tested reactive…we sought 2nd and 3rd opinion the result is both non reactive…my mother undergone the same test and the result is non reactive.

    i am in great trouble which is which…what should i do? i was vaccinated already with 2 shots..afterwards..

    1. Hello: If I understand your question correctly, you tested positive for hepatitis B. If you can find that lab report, see if it shows that you tested “reactive” to the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)? When you test positive for HBsAg, it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. After that, you tested negative or nonreactive for hepatitis B (probably for HBsAg) on two subsequent tests. That is good news. There have been cases where a lab got a false positive, or perhaps the equipment was contaminated. If two subsequent tests showed you do not have HBsAg, that means you are not infected. For a chart to help you understand your blood test results, go to http://www.hepb.org/patients/understanding_the_results.htm
      It could be that you had a short or “acute” infection and have cleared the infection. If you have been infected in the past, your test would show that you test positive for the hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb).
      If you have recently been vaccinated with the two doses, talk to your doctor and you may want to get the third dose, and then get another blood test to make sure you have enough hepatitis B antibodies to protect you from infection in case you have not been exposed and the prior positive test was just a lab error. Thanks and good luck.

  102. i have been tested by
    HBSAg= +
    HBeAg= –
    HBEAb=+
    viral laod= less than 116 copies/ml and the used technique starts to detect viral load from 115 copies/ml
    the doctor told me that i dont need treatment but i fell some a symptoms such as chronic flu, loosing weights, lack of appetite, feeling weak ect…
    i need your advice am in Rwanda . God bless

    1. Hello: I am sorry to hear of your hepatitis B infection. Is this the first time you have been tested and found to be positive for hepatitis B? If it is, you will want to be tested again in about six months to see if you are still infected. When a healthy adult is infected with the hepatitis B virus, most are able to fight off the infection and clear it over several weeks or months. However, when newborns and young children are exposed (or adults with weak immune systems) they often develop long-term or chronic infections because their bodies don’t clear the infection.
      When people are first infected, a small percentage of them experience feelings of weakness and loss of appetite, I don’t know if that applies to you. It depends if you have a new infection. It is important that you talk to your doctor about your symptoms so you know if they result from your hepatitis B or from some other source.
      Good luck.

  103. Hello sir
    i have test and i have hap b januery this and i dont have any sytom of it i don known wish year and when were i get it. Am 24year and i don one to transmit it to my wife and my unborn children when i get marriage his is my test HBsAg+ HBsAb- HBeAg- HBeAb+ HBcAb+
    How can not transmit this Weaket varuis to them i do abdominal scan all it in good condition.

    1. Hello: I know this is a shock for you right now, but many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B; and they marry and have children. The good news, from what you indicated, is that your abdominal scan looks good. Have you had liver tests done? Particular for ALT/SGPT? This measures a liver enzyme that increases above normal (about 30 in men) when the infection is hurting your liver. It will be important when you plan to marry to make sure your prospective wife has been screened, (to see if she is infected) and immunized with all three hepatitis B vaccine doses if she is found to be not infected. She should be screened one or two months after her last vaccine shot to make sure she has sufficient antibodie3s (also called titers) to fight infection. Until then, you must practice safe sex and use a condom.
      It will be important that your children are immediately immunized at birth (within 12 hours) and given a dose of HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) to fight infection.
      For now, though, it is important that you take care of yourself, eat healthy, and refrain from drinking alcohol and smoking.
      Everyone in your household should be screened and immunized. Also, bandage any cuts or bruises you have and do not share razors or nail.
      Good luck.

  104. pls disregard the earlier comment
    hello Dr.
    i tested Hep B positive about three years ago. these were my results in june 2013
    HbsAg positive
    HBsAb negative
    HbeAg Negative
    HbeAb Negative
    HbcAb Positive
    in April 2015 i did another test and the results are
    HbsAg positive
    HBsAb negative
    HbeAg Negative
    HbeAb Positive
    HbcAb Positive
    i also did a liver function test and the results were
    SGOT(AST) 54
    SGPT(ALT) 35
    Alkaline Phosphate 127
    total bilirubin 8.43
    direct bilirubin 3.21
    indirect bilirubin 5.22
    total protein 80.1
    albumin 45.4
    Globulin 34.7
    i dont know what it means now and am not on any medication. am scared and i want to see a liver specialist ASAP. Thank you

    1. Hello: Your test results have not changed dramatically, from what I can tell, in the last two years. You are HBeAg negative and HB “e” antibody positive (HBeAb), which means your viral load may not be very high. The next time you have a test, you may want to ask to have your HBV DNA (viral load–the amount of virus in your blood) tested to see how that is. The good news is your ALT (SGPT) is 35, which is generally normal. ALT (alanine aminotransferase) is an enzyme that your liver cells release when they are damaged or die, so this shows that the infection does not appear to be harming your liver. I encourage you to review the results with your doctor, but from what I can see it does not appear that you need treatment, but I do not know your viral load and your doctor can certain assess you better. Good luck.

    1. Hello: Just to review, you tested positive once for HBsAg, and afterwards tested negative for HBsAg twice. If you are asking if you should have an HBV DNA test, which measures the amount of virus in your blood, I would think it may not be necessary. If you are concerned, talk to your doctor and in a while have another test for all of the hepatitis B antigens and antibodies. Hopefully this will confirm that you have generated hepatits B surface antibodies, indicating your have cleared the infection. Good Luck.

      1. Hello: The cost of a viral load test varies, depending where you live, and can be more expensive than regular hepatitis B tests. If you are concerned about your infection status, talk to your doctor and get another round of hepatitis B tests if the doctor recommends. Good luck.

          1. Hello: Did you have any reaction after the first or second vaccine shot? We are not aware of getting a cold as a side effect from the hepatitis B vaccine. However if you are ill, you should see your doctor and share your concerns. Good luck.

  105. why do doctors not allow the patient of HBV to be treated when viral load is still low and wait for signs of liver disease ? if HB is treated why can not treat it as soon as possible in order to prevent the risk? or HBV is the same as HIV ? i always wonder about such question

    1. Hello: Because there is no “cure” for hepatitis B, treating this infection is tricky and may seem counter-intuitive. Right now there are two treatments for hepatitis B and they work only when conditions are right.
      Pegylated interferon: This drug, administered weekly by injection, stimulates the immune system to fight the infection. However, it works only when your viral load is relatively low and your ALT levels are elevated, indicating your immune system is attacking your infected liver cells. If those two conditions aren’t present, the interferon won’t be effective in “waking up” your immune system to fight the infection. Also, this treatment is very expensive and causes some side effects, so you don’t want to use interferon unless the conditions are right.
      Antivirals: These daily pills make it hard for the virus to multiply, but they work only for as long as you take them. So doctors don’t want to prescribe antivirals in someone who already has a low viral load and no signs of liver damage. Hope this helps.

  106. where HB originally come from? because for me i dont know where i have been infected the only cause of my infection am doubting is medical drugs i took long time ( six months ) i was taking pills of tubercular can it be the cause of HB ?

    1. Hello: The hepatitis B virus is transmitted through contact with infectious blood and body fluids. The blood/fluids that contain the virus must enter your body. The majority of chronic infections are transmitted from mother to child at birth. If you have a chronic infection, it is likely you came into contact with the virus at birth or during childhood. The hepatitis B virus is very resilient and can live on hard surface in dried blood for several days. It is important to concentrate today and how you can keep yourself healthy. Good luck.

  107. hbsag postive
    hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab postive
    hbsab negative
    it has been like 7 weeks since i have been infected ,my doctor say normal liver and come back after 6 month .so what did i do? which foods are good to remove the virus please help me

    1. Hello: The best thing to do is eat healthy foods and do not drink alcohol or smoke. If you were recently infected, your immune system is working to get rid of the virus by creating antibodies and also attacking the infected liver cells. So get plenty of sleep, and take precautions so you do not spread the infection. Bandage any cuts and bruises, do not share razors or nail clippers, and practice safe sex (use a condom). Also, make sure everyone in your household has been screened for hepatitis B and immunized if they are not infected. Good luck.

  108. i want to know this an acute infection or chronic one?
    there is small discomfort onthe abdomain and night time sound,what did i do for this?
    i am going to get merry this have any side effect?i mean how many years i leave?on sexual intercourse(i am felling weak this days,what did i do to be strong)?on baby also?please give me deital analysis on my result and answer my queations breifly
    hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab postive
    hbsab negative
    hbsag postive
    liver biopsy normal
    no damage on the liver

    1. Hello: If you have a chronic infection, you will test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for more than six months. If you are newly-diagnosed, your doctor will test you again in six months to find out. To find out more about having a Hep B infection, visit http://www.hepb.org/patients/adults_and_hepatitis_b.htm
      You can eat meat with hepatitis B. As long as you have a healthy diet, and avoid alcohol and smoking, you are doing all you can. Usually, Hep B does not cause any pain or discomfort, that may be the stress you are feeling at this time, however I encourage you to talk to your doctor about your symptoms.
      You can of course marry. However, it is very important that your partner is screened for Hep B and vaccinated before you have unprotected intercourse. Hep B is transmitted through direct contact with blood and body fluids, such as semen. So you must use a condom, bandage any cuts or bruises, and do not share razors or nail clippers. Also, all of your family and household should also be screened and vaccinated.
      I am happy to hear the infection has caused no liver damage. Keep up your healthy diet, and good luck.

  109. thanks for your help and also i want to ask i go frequantely to toilet this beacuse i drink too much water or is it linked to hipitites b?i also loose 5 kg with one month so which my bmr is 18 what foods do i need to eat to get my kg back? how can i support my body to fight back the hipitites virus since it is in acute state i think?please help me

    1. Hello: If you are newly infected and experiencing symptoms from acute hepatitis B, they may last a few days or weeks. These can include nausea, loss of appetite and general weakness. The best thing to do, in addition to seeing your doctor, is to eat healthy foods and get plenty of rest, and of course avoid alcohol and smoking. I would also talk to your doctor about frequent urination, unless you feel it results from drinking water. Good luck.

  110. hi how are you?i have a question before 10 days i have sex with a prostitute i have drunk and i not use a condom she is on menstruation after i did not know after i finish there is a blood on dick.i am too much scared and the next day i go hospital to check std then i found out i have hipitaites b my result is hbsag hbcab and hbeab postive i am confused i have been before infected or that day too much virus enter my body?i am developing itching in my right leg now why?what should i do now no sleep too much freaked out one mistake is going to kill me

    1. Hello: It can take days or weeks for a hepatitis B infection to show up in a lab test, so there is a good chance you were infected before you had unprotected sex. Have you ever been tested for hepatitis B before? Has anyone in your family tested positive for hepatitis B? It is important that you see a doctor who specialized in hepatitis B, who will test you to see if you have a chronic infection (if you test positive for hepatitis B for longer than six months then it is a chronic infection) or if you were recently infected. The doctor will also test you to see if the infection has harmed your liver.
      This one mistake is not going to kill you. Keep in mind many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B, however it is very important that you avoid alcohol and smoking, and eat healthy foods to help your immune system fight the virus.
      Keep in mind that hepatitis B is spread through exposure to blood and body fluids, including semen, so the woman you had unprotected sex with was exposed to the virus. It is very important that you use safe sex (a condom) and that your partners or family members are screened for hepatitis B and immunized. For more information about hepatitis B, please visit http://www.hepb.org/patients/adults_and_hepatitis_b.htm
      Good luck.

  111. after i am infected hbsag postive is it ok to take vacination? it has any side effect ? it helps my immunity?

  112. how many years an acute infected person leave and a chronic paitent leave?tell me the average please,on one website i read one paitent at 18 he got infected with hep b chronic and after two years changed cancer i am too much worried and can not sleep please please what are my chances

  113. i have some queation this my first test before 7 weeks befor no check
    1)hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab postive
    hbsab negative
    hbsag postive
    liver biopsy normal
    no damage on the liver
    the doctor say come back after 6 month, is this acute or chronic from your experiance which one you think?
    2)how can i support my body to fight back the hipitites virus?
    3)i no smoke or drink i eat this days vegitables what foods you recomand me?
    4)if it is acutely infected paitent have 90% of chance developing imunity right,i am 30 years age other no disease have what are my chance to be in the 90%?
    5)if it is chronic with new medicnes what is the life expentancy of a paitent who is chronicaly infected?
    6)now i have some syptom,abdomainal discomfort( small pain, sound)around the right side is this due to new infection ( my body is fighting the virus) or because it is chronic?
    7)last is before 7 weeks i am good at sleeping, after i know this i have too much problem last night i sleep only 4 hours is it the stress or this also syptom of hep b or this one also linked to acute and chronic?please please answer all the 7 queation this will be a great relif for me since i know my status it helps me a lot please whether it is a good news or bad do not hide from me tell me the truth ok

    1. Hello: No one will know for sure if you have a chronic or acute infection until after your six-month check-up. It all depends on whether you were infected when you were young, or whether this is a new infection. I understand you are worried and stressed, and that may be causing your sleeplessness. The best thing you can do for yourself is eat healthy foods (which can include meat) and refraining from smoking and drinking alcohol, which you are doing. Good luck.

  114. i have not tested for hipitites before but my brother check and he is negative?as i told you before virus amount enterd the body have difference i mean large amount blood enter chronic small amout acute?

    1. Hello: How much virus you are exposed to does not determine if you develop a chronic (long-term) or acute infection. That is determined by your age and the strength of your immune system. Babies and young children who are exposed to the virus tend to develop chronic infections because their young immune systems don’t recognize the virus and eradicate it. Thank you.

    1. Hello: The “second” antigen to appear after infection is the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg). If you have an acute infection, your immune system generates the “e” antibody within a few weeks or months. If you have a chronic infection, you can be HBeAg-positive for many months or years.
      Remember, you are considered to have a chronic infection when you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months. The surface antigen is the last antigen to disappear when you clear the virus. Thanks

  115. Hello: The hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) or the hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) simply means you have been exposed to the virus. It’s the first viral antigen (protein) to appear in a lab test after you’ve been infected, and the core antibody is the first antibody to appear to fight the infection, usually within a few weeks of exposure to the virus. Thanks

  116. hi doc i check today before 2 month my resut is this
    hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab postive
    hbsab negative
    hbsag postive
    liver biopsy normal
    no damage on the liver

    today i check and
    hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab negative
    ant hbe may not be detectable in infections caused by non hbeag producing hbv mutant
    hbsab negative
    hbsag postive
    liver biopsy normal
    no damage on the liver
    hi doc i check today before 2 month my resut is this
    hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab postive
    hbsab negative
    hbsag postive
    liver biopsy normal
    no damage on the liver

    today i check and
    hbeag negative
    hbcab postive
    hbeab negative
    comment -ant hbe may not be detectable in infections caused by non hbeag producing hbv mutant
    hbsab negative
    hbsag postive
    liver biopsy normal
    no damage on the liver
    what does my result mean? is it a good sign or things are getting worse please help
    hbeab is antibody against the virus but my body stop to fight ?is it deafeted and now i am chronicaly infected?why not ant hbe not detected in comment part

    what does my result mean? is it a good sign or things are getting worse please help

    1. Hello: Your results have stayed the same, and neither shows any liver damage. Keep getting monitored and follow your doctor recommendations. Thanks.

  117. Hbs ag – reactive
    Hbe ag – reacative
    Anti hbe – reactive
    Anti hbs – non reactive
    Anti hbc – reactive
    Anti hbc igm – non reactive
    Hb antibody :2.0iu/l
    Anti hb surface – reactive

    Can u figure out my result??

    1. Hello: I’m afraid I cannot. The top two reports (HBsAg and HBeAg) show you test positive for them (reactive), which indicates an active hepatitis B infection. However, it appears you also test positive for the “e” antibody (anti HBe). It is rare to test positive for both the “e” antigen and antibody at the same time, less you are in the midst of seroconverting — losing the antigen and developing the antibody. I’m equally confused by the Anti hb surface – reactive, it is also rare to test positive for both the surface antigen and antibody at the same time. Please talk to your doctor. The report may be written down wrong, or there was some problem with the test result. If possible, ask your doctor if you should be retested if he/she also finds the results confusing. Good luck.

  118. what other test should i need to take? i am too much confused why hbeab and hbeag negative?what is hbv mutant?this mutant make hbeab negative before postive thid has any side effect or another problem have?my specialist say no need medicine now i leave in poor country i do not believe him,please please help him tell me all and also if i need to check another thing

    1. Hello: What is most important is whether you are experiencing any liver damage, and your test results (and your doctor) indicate there is no liver damage, so at this time you probably do not need any treatment. When it’s time for your next test, then you can see what the results are, especially in regard to your HBeAg status, and discuss them with your doctor. Good luck.

  119. you always not like to answer life expectancy for hep patient why ?we deserve to know
    i read on one site for chronic 2-5 years for carriers 10-15 years right

    1. That’s because no one can answer that question! There are too many variables! I know many, many people living long, full lives with chronic HBV. Some die of conditions totally unrelated to their chronic HBV. Live your life to the fullest. A chronic illness like Hepatitis B may shape you, but don’t let it define you.

    2. Hello: No one can predict your life expectancy with a hepatitis B infection. It depends on many things, including whether you have liver damage or if you smoke or drink. Many people with hepatitis B live long, healthy lives. No one can predict this. Thank you.

  120. do you know any body who is infected with hbv then after 6 month beacames free of hbv please tell the truth my doctor say after infected i have worked 25 years no one will remove the virus whether it is acute or chronic they say this only to give the paitents moral and until they are used to virus, only they have tretements is this true please help me and tell me the truth

    1. Hello: If you are infected with HBV when you’re a healthy adult, it can take up to six months for your body to fight off and clear the virus from your body, perhaps that is what your doctor is referring to. A short infection, under six months, is called an adult infection. If it lasts longer than six months, it is called a chronic infection. If you have a chronic infection, it can last several years or even a lifetime, and you should be monitored regularly. If the infection ever damages your liver, your doctor can prescribe treatment. Good luck.

  121. hello Dr. my results are :

    HBS Ag = positive
    HBC ab : negative
    HBS Ab = results ( 2.0), unit ( ui/l ) , minimum ( 2.0) , maximum ( 10.0)
    HB viral load results less than 20 unit ( ui/ml)

    i have been tested positive Hb in october 2014, and these results are of august 2015

    help me to know what is going on

    1. Hello: Your results show you are chronically infected with hepatitis B, however the good news is your viral load (HBV DNA) is very low. Has your doctor tested your liver enzymes (ALT – alanine aminotransferase) to find out how your liver is doing? Please talk to your doctor if he hasn’t tested your ALT yet. That is one more test to make sure your infection is not harming your liver. Good luck.

  122. if you are infected by HBV in adulthood and persist to be positive even after six months what is the cause ? and is it possible to be recovered after six months ? or you persist positively in your lifetime tell me Dr

    1. Hello: A small percentage of people who become infected as adults are not able to clear the virus and develop chronic or long-term infections. There are many reasons why this happens, usually it’s because the immune system isn’t able to get rid of the virus. We recommend you eat healthy foods, and stay away from alcohol and smoking, to give your liver and your immune system a chance to fight the infection. Good luck.

  123. i have been tested positive HBV in october 2014
    now the results of 2015 august are

    HBS Ag =positive
    hbs ab = at minimum level
    HBv viral load = undetectable
    but total bilirubin and direct bilirubin are at highest level ( over maximum )

  124. my results showed that viral load is undetectable, ALT is normal , but bilirubins are high
    is my liver being damaged

  125. My brother (now 35 year old) diagnosed with Hepatitis B Virus since past 12 years. Doctors advice no treatment currently and just to monitor the tests annually. Please see below the readings and advice. Also want to marry but the problem is to reveal or hide the condition. As revealing can get rejection from proposals and hiding would be unethical. Please advice.

    (Year 2011 test report):
    SGOT 21
    SGPT 37
    AFP 1.76
    HBeAG Non-reactive (0.559)
    HCV Negative (0.13)
    HBsAG Positive (4.355.83)
    HBV DNA 312
    Log value 2.49

    (Year 2015 test reports):
    HBV DNA 139
    Log value 2.14

    Please see the difference in the HBV DNA readings of 2011 and 2015. What does it mean. Also please tell about my status. We visit doctor annually with blood tests. The doctors suggested no treatment as of now. Just to monitor.

    Now worry is about the marraige proposals.

    Thanks.

    1. Hello: In general it appears your brother is doing fine and the decline in viral load is always good. I am glad that you are getting him tested regularly.
      I appreciate it is hard to raise the topic of hepatitis B with someone you would like to date and marry, but as you point out, it is unethical not to inform a sexual partner about your hepatitis B. We recommend that he takes it slow, find someone he likes and then tell her about his hepatitis B. It is important to explain that with the immunization, she can be thoroughly protected against hepatitis B. If she hasn’t already been immunized, she must receive all three vaccine doses (the second shot is 30 days after the first dose, and the third is six months after the first dose.) One or two months after the third shot, she should be screened for hepatitis B antibodies (also called titers) to make sure she has at least 10 mIU/mL to protect her.
      Until you are sure she has enough antibodies to protect her, it is very important to practice safe sex and use a condom.
      If she was immunized long ago, her titer levels may be under 10, if that is the case talk to the doctor and get one more hepatitis B vaccine shot (called a booster), and then test again to see if the antibodies have increased.
      It is hard to disclose your infection, but you can find out exactly what kind of person she is. Good luck.

  126. Hi I just got my HBV profile result today and he
    re are the results.

    Hbsag 2297 Reactive
    Anti hbs non reactive
    Hbeag 2142 Reactive
    Anti hbe 14.32 non reactive
    Anti hbc (igg) reactive
    Anti hbc (igm) non reactive

    Just want to ask what does this means. I am still looking for a liver specialist to make an appointment.

    Thank you

    1. Hello: Is this the first time you have tested positive for hepatitis B? If so, your doctor will want to test again in six months to determine if this is a new (acute) infection or a chronic infection.
      Because you are positive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg), you may have lots of virus in your body right now. It is important that you bandage all cuts and bruises, do not share razors and practice safe sex (use a condom) to protect your partner.
      Try to find a doctor who is familiar with hepatitis B. You can find a list of liver specialists familiar with Hep B at http://www.hepb.org/resources/liver_specialist_directory.htm
      Your doctor will order additional tests to find out if the infection is harming your liver and also what your viral load is.
      Make sure your family/household members are screened for hepatitis B and vaccinated if they need it.
      Try to eat healthy foods, and refrain from drinking alcohol or smoking. Good luck.

  127. Hi

    I have had semi risky sexual exposures on the 25th of may and 11th of june 2015. The second was the higher risk in my opinion.

    On the 1 of august 2015 i tested negative for hbsag (7 weeks after the second risky exposures)

    On the the 11 of sep 2015, exactly 3 months after the risky exposure, i tested the following:

    Hbsag – negative
    Hbcab igg – positive
    Hbcab igm -positive
    Hbsab – positive

    What does this mean? Is it a recent infection?

    Since then, during the three months, i have been in close contact with a woman, not sexual intercourse, but i have fingered her, and we have been holding hands, kissing, being close and coupley alot. ( i never took my underwear off)

    Did i infect her?

    1. Hello: During your Aug. 1 test, was only your hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) tested? And were the core and surface antibodies only tested during the second test? In both tests you have tested negative for the hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), which means you are not infected. However, because you tested positive for the core antibody (HBcAb) and the suface antibody (HBsAb), it means you have been infected at some point in your life. Because you test positive for surface antibodies, you are now protected from infection. When an adult is infected, it can take several weeks or months to clear the infection and produce surface antibodies. It is impossible to predict when exactly you were infected from this lab test.
      In order to infect someone, your blood or body fluids (semen) need to enter the other person’s body through sex, or fluids entering through an cut or other opening. You don’t have to worry about that because you are not infected. However, I recommend everyone practice safe sex and use condoms. Remember, about 70% of people with hepatitis B know they are infected. Good luck.

    1. Hello: The lab results you have shared show you are infected with hepatitis B. We cannot say if you need treatment without knowing whether the infection is harming your liver and if your viral load is high. The blood test that shows if the infection is harming your liver is called an ALT (alanine aminotransferase or SGPT) test. However, the best thing you can do for yourself is to eat healthy food, and stay away from alcohol and smoking. Also, remember to bandage your cuts or bruises, do not share razors or nail clippers, and practice safe sex (use a condom). Your blood and body fluids, including semen, can transmit the virus. Also, make sure your family and household members are screened for hepatitis B. Make sure they are vaccinated if they have not been infected. Thank you and good luck.

  128. Hi! I would like to ask for interpretation about this hepa profile results:
    Hepa B surface antigen: non reactive
    Anti HBs: reactive
    Anti HBC: reactive
    Anti HAC: reactive.

    Thanks

    1. Hello: These results show this person was infected with hepatitis B in the past. Luckily, he has “cleared” the infection and developed hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb or Anti HBs). He is not capable of infecting anyone and he is now immune to a new infection. Good luck.

  129. 23yrs femal
    Pregnant state
    HbsAg positive
    HbsAb negative
    HbeAg negative
    HbeAb negative
    Hbv real time PCR : no detect
    Ast/alt :normal
    What is diagnosis? False positive?

    1. Hello: Because you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), this means you are infected with hepatitis B. The good news is you appear to have “inactive” hepatitis B because you have no detectable viral load and your ALT levels are normal. The blood test that shows if the infection is harming your liver is called an ALT (alanine aminotransferase or SGPT) test. Our liver cells release ALT when they are damaged. In women, healthy ALT levels are generally 19 or less. Numbers can vary from lab to lab. I would recommend you see a liver specialist who is familiar with hepatitis B, and get retested. It is also very important that you make sure your baby is immunized within 12 hours of birth and given an injection of HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) to protect them against infection. It is very common for women to infect their babies during delivery because of the presence of the virus in their blood and body fluids. However, you can safely breastfeed without infecting your baby. Make sure your household members are screened for hepatitis B and immunized if needed. It is important to take care of yourself and have your hepatitis B monitored throughout your life if this is a chronic or long-term infection. Good luck.

  130. hi doc i was testedAGHBs positive, HBe antobodies positove and Hep b DNA vorus present in my blood.at 3.3ui/ml and 2206 ui/ml.
    dr , i don’t understand anythi g.please enlighten me especially as o am 6months old pregnant

    1. Hello: If you tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it means you are infected with hepatitis B. The good news is you already have developed antibodies to the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAb) and your viral load is not very high. It is important to have your ALT (alanine aminotransferase) tested. This is a blood test that measures ALT in your blood. Our liver cells release ALT when they are damaged by hepatitis B. A woman’s ALT level should be around 19 or under.
      It is important that you see a liver specialist who is familiar with hepatitis B who can monitor your health. It is also crucial that when your baby is born, he is vaccinated with the first hepatitis B vaccine shot and given HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) within 12 hours of birth. Even though your viral load is not extremely high, it is still possible for your baby to become infected during delivery because of the contact with your blood and body fluids.
      So please make sure your hepatitis B is regularly monitored, and make sure your family and household members are screened for hepatitis B and vaccinated if necessary.
      For more information on pregnancy and hepatitis B, please visit http://www.hepb.org/patients/pregnacy_and_hbv.htm
      Good luck.

      1. Hello Doc

        My test result shows as

        HBsAg = Negative
        HBsAb = Non-reactive (value = 3.29)
        HBcAb( Igm) = Negative
        HBcAb = positive

        I’m confuse with this test result. Can you advise my condition? Thank you

        1. Hello:
          Because you are HBcAb-positive, it means you have been infected at some point. You may have an inactive infection. You do not have enough hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in your body to be picked up by a lab test, and your immune system has not produced enough hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb) to be identified by a lab test either. We recommend that you continue to be monitored regularly for hepatitis B to track what is happening to the infection over time. With luck, you may eventually develop hepatitis B surface antibodies and clear the infection. Keep eating healthy food and stay away from alcohol and cigarettes. Also, continue to use safe sex practices (use a condom). Thank you and good luck.

  131. Hei Doctor:

    My test result show as
    Hepatitis Be antigen: negative
    Hepatitis be antibody:positive
    And
    HbsAg: positive
    HBcAb : positive
    HpC Ab : negative
    Dont feel Sick at all and am quite active young woman.
    Plz explain the result for me.
    Have a nice day

    1. Hello: It appears you are infected with hepatitis B, because you have tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Is this your first hepatitis B test? If it is, you should be tested again in about six months to find out if you were recently infected and have an “acute” or short-term infection, or if you have a long-term chronic infection, which you may have had since childhood. Has your family members been screened and immunized?
      The majority of people with hepatitis B feel no symptoms from the infection, and many lead long and healthy lives without ever requiring treatment.
      Have your had your liver enzymes (called ALT or SGPT) tested? This will tell whether the infection is harming your liver. Anyone with hepatitis B needs to be monitored and have their liver health checked regularly. Also, eat healthy foods, don’t drink alcohol or smoke, and always practice safe sex (use a condom.) Good luck.

      1. Hei Doctor,
        am a young woman who is married and active person. I dont drink or smoke, but for few days ago , I found out that am
        HBsAG : POSITIVE
        HBeAG: NEGATIVE
        HBcAB Tot : POSITIVE
        Hep C AB: NEGATIVE

        Bili :9
        ALP:51
        GGT:16
        ALT: 36 WHICH HIGH
        ALP: 45
        TP: 78

        I had ultrasound Abdomen:
        the live is normal and there is no significant sonographic abnormality demonstrated.

        please help me to know what is going on? is it an acute or chronic infection?
        should I have no medicine for that ?plz I need an answer as soon as possible

        1. Hello: Was this the first time you were screened for hepatitis B? You won’t know if you have acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) hepatitis B until you have been tested for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) six months from your first test. I expect your doctor wants you to return for another test in six months. If you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, you are considered to be chronically infected and may have been infected when you were an infant. When healthy adults are infected, it can take up to six months for their immune system to clear the virus and produce hepatitis B surface antibodies.
          Your ALT is 36, which is moderately elevated. The normal for women is 19 or less, but lab results can vary so allow some leeway. It sounds like you are receiving good care, considering your doctor ordered an ultrasound, which I’m glad to hear was normal.
          It is important that your husband and family members are screened for hepatitis B, and vaccinated if needed. You may want to use condoms with your husband until you know if he has the hepatitis B surface antibody either from immunization or past exposure to the virus.
          Keep eating healthy foods, and do not drink or smoke. It will be very important if you have children to make sure they are immunized with the first hepatitis B vaccine shot within 12 hours of birth, and that they receive HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) to prevent infection.
          Good luck.

    1. Hello: The minimum required hepatitis B surface antibody count (also called titers) to be fully protected against hepatitis B is 10 mIU/mL. I apologize, I’m not familiar with the ng/ml measurement. Thank you.

  132. Hei Doctor,
    am a young woman who is married and active person. I dont drink or smoke, but for few days ago , I found out that am
    HBsAG : POSITIVE
    HBeAG: NEGATIVE
    HBcAB Tot : POSITIVE
    Hep C AB: NEGATIVE

    Bili :9
    ALP:51
    GGT:16
    ALT: 36 WHICH HIGH
    ALP: 45
    TP: 78

    I had ultrasound Abdomen:
    the live is normal and there is no significant sonographic abnormality demonstrated.

    please help me to know what is going on? is it an acute or chronic infection?
    should I have no medicine for that ?plz I need an answer as soon as possible

    1. Hello: As I noted in my other response, you won’t know if you have acute or long-term hepatitis B until you have been tested for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months. If you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, you are considered to be chronically infected. When healthy adults are infected, it can take up to six months for their immune system to clear the virus and produce hepatitis B surface antibodies. Have you had a viral load (HBV DNA) test? This would determine if you have lots of virus in your body. Your ALT is a little high, (normal for women is 19 or less). ALT levels rise above normal when liver cells are damaged and release ALT into the blood. Whether or not you need treatment depends on whether you have a high viral load and elevated ALT. Your ALT is only moderately elevated, only your doctor who can see the “big picture” will know if you need treatment. Good luck.

  133. Dear Doctor,
    I was recently diagnosed with:
    HbsAg +
    HbeAg –
    HbeAb –
    HbcAb IgM 0.15 index (n.v. < 0.80)
    HBV-DNA: not detected

    Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase: 72 U/L with normal values between 8 and 62
    AST (SGOT): 21 U/L (normal values between 5 and 42)
    ALT (SGPT): 44 (normal values between U/L 5 and 42)

    These results are confusing to me. Would you be more inclined to think of a chronic or of an acute B hepatitis?
    Thank you for your help, I am quite worried!

    1. Hello: Was this the first time you were screened for hepatitis B? You won’t know if you have acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) hepatitis B until you have been tested for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months, I expect your doctor wants you to return for another test in six months. If you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, you are considered to be chronically infected. When healthy adults are infected, it can take up to six months for their immune system to clear the virus and produce hepatitis B surface antibodies.
      It is unusual to test negative for the hepatitis B “e” antibody AND antigen. It may be that you are in the process of losing the “e” antigen and developing the “e” antibody, which is a good thing. It’s also a good thing that your viral load is undetectable, and your ALT level is only a bit above normal.
      We recommend you get tested again in six months, and make sure you eat healthy food and do not drink alcohol and smoke, both of which harm your liver. Also, be sure to practice safe sex (use a condom) if you are sexually active. Good luck.

  134. Thank you for your reply!
    Yes, first test. Will repeat it according to my doctor.
    Is it possible to be both HbeAg – and HbeAb – on the long run (more than six month)?

    1. Hello: Eventually, either the “e” antibody or antigen will emerge. This may be confusing, but sometimes people lose the “e” antigen during antiviral treatment, but then it re-appears when they stop antiviral treatment. If you are not on treatment, the same process can occur as your immune system advances then retreats as it tries to clear the “e” antigen and produce “e” antibodies. Let us know what your next test shows! Good luck.

  135. Hei doctor. what do you think about the trial that the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute was involved in?is that true?do you any details about this medisin? Is There is any hope for us?

    Zineb

  136. Hello doctor,
    I got to know about my Hepatitis B in first year of my college in 2011 when they ask all the students to go for blood check up. After that I met doctor regarding this and went through tests. I am HBsAg positive and my viral count (HBV DNA PCR) remains between 100-900 IU/Ml.
    The main problem is now i am applying for further studies to United States and Germany. But i think i’ll have trouble getting student visa due to Hepatitis. I am very much healthy, all my reports are excellent from the very beginning only and never had any trouble with Hepatitis.
    So my concern is will i have problem getting student to either of the countries i.e US or Germany?

    1. Hello: You will not be rejected for a student visa to the U.S. if you have hepatitis B. I do not know what Germany requires for information for its student visas. Except for some Middle Eastern countries, which unfortunately discriminate against people with hepatitis C, most countries want to know about your general health status. It may be good to have your medical records available that show your good health and “inactive” hepatitis B status in case Germany or some other country requires it.
      Good luck.

      1. Thanks alot!!!
        I really appreciate it.
        Since i go for regular check ups in every 6 months, so i can show them reports. But should i report my Hepatitis beforehand?

        1. Hi: No I would not disclose upfront, I’d wait and see what each country requires. However, I would research Germany and each country before you apply for the school so you don’t waste time or resources. Good luck.

        2. Hello: No, I would wait for the paperwork that is required and respond only if they request that information. Good luck.

  137. when we go abroad our company checks for stds and at that time I was free I go Dubai for work meeting I slept with ***** the day I come back, I stay there for 4 days and come back my country,during sex condom broke up and I was also afraid so at 5 day when I reach my countryi go to check for stds I found out hep b positive.before I go i check for stds and negative all but after the incident all changed.when I read about hep b I am confused window period beacuse i check everytime I go there like 1 year 13 times for metting I am CEO for one company and my job is in problem please help i check 5 time all come postive

    1. Hello: If I understand, you have not tested positive for hepatitis B (the hepatitis B surface antigen-HBsAg) ever in the past several years. A few days after a sexual encounter, you were tested and this time tested positive for HBsAg. You are right, it would take more than a few days for the infection to be detected by a lab test. It could be that you were infected when you were a baby or child, but have had “inactive” hepatitis B for many years. In some people, the virus is so inactive (held in check by your immune system) that you test negative for HBsAg. Perhaps you were exhausted and sick or drank lots of alcohol and the HBsAg level increased enough to finally be picked up by a lab test.
      Or, perhaps you were exposed a year or a few months ago, and it is just showing up in your lab test now? If you were recently infected, you may clear the virus after a few weeks or months. I would get checked again and also get checked for the hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb). If you test positive for this antibody, it means you have cleared the infection and developed immunity, or you have been immunized in the past.
      Having hepatitis B should in no way affect your job. I know some countries unfortunately discriminate against people with hepatitis B.
      Because you have tested positive, it is important that you get your family screened for hepatitis B and vaccinated if needed. Also, eat healthy food, and do not smoke or drink alcohol. Continue to practice safe sex (use a condom) to prevent the spread of the infection. Good luck.

  138. Please help me to understand my report my test value is HBV DNA quantitative(real time pcr)=7667 iu/ml Anti HBe serum= Reactive HBe Ag=non reactive SGOT=55 IU/L SGPT=73 IU/L. ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE=171 U/L. I want to know in this report conditions I need treatment or not.

    1. Hello: If I understand your report, your viral is not terribly high, however your SGPT is a bit elevated, indicating possible liver damage. I could never say whether you need treatment or not because I don’t know your overall health, I would encourage you to see a liver specialist who is familiar with hepatitis B and review all of your lab reports over time to see how you are doing and whether you need treatment. In the meantime, please eat healthy foods, and refrain from drinking alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  139. Hi doc,

    Please help me interpret the blood report. Results as shown below.

    HBsAg Screening Reactive (>250.00) iu/ml

    Anti HBsAg. ANtibody to Heb B surface antigen: Non Reactive (0.77) mIU/ml

    HBeAg-Hep B Envelope Antigen: Non Reactive (0.38) S/CO

    Anti HBe-Ab to Hep B Envelope Ag: Reactive(0.02) Ratio

    HbcAb-IgM Ab Hep B Core antigen: Non Reactive (0.75) Ratio

    HbcAb-Total Ab to Hep-B Core Ag : Reactive (12.2) Index

    I want to know if this can be reversed.

    I dont have any symptoms of heb b

    my LFT results good as well.

    1. Hello: Is this the first time you have been tested for hepatitis B? Do you know for sure you have chronic hepatitis B or is there a chance you were recently infected? Chronic hepatitis B occurs when you test positive for hepatitis B for longer than six months.
      It appears that you may have “inactive” hepatitis B, given your SGPT is within the normal range, which means your liver is healthy. Also, you have developed the hepatitis B “e” antibody, which usually indicates your viral load (HBV DNA) may be reduced. Only your doctor knows your true health status, because he can examine you and follow your test results over time. So keep up the good work, eat healthy and avoid alcohol and cigarette smoking. Good luck.

  140. Hi Doc,
    Thanks for reply, I am not sure wat kind of hep b i have, actually i was planning to get visa for Saudi and they test for this also then only i came to know that i have hep b.

    I took hep b vaccination but never completed the full course last to last year i was in equador there also i took the first shot but was not able to get the other.

    Yes this was the first time i tested for it.

    Can you please tell me or suggest me tat is it serious or can it be reversed as my work is mostly in middle east countries but due to this hep b i cant get my visa .

    Thanks for your reply.

    appreciated.

    Akhtar

    1. Hello: Unfortunately, some countries discriminate against people with hepatitis B and will not issue them student or work visas. If you have tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), then you are considered infected. Getting vaccinated against hepatitis B will not make the infection go away. We recommend that you get tested again for hepatitis B. If you test positive (reactive) for HBsAg for longer than six months, it means you may have been infected when you were a baby or child, and your immature immune didn’t notice or fight the virus and you developed a chronic infection. Some adults with compromised or weak immune systems can also develop a chronic infection, but most healthy adults are able to clear the virus within a few weeks or months. If you have cleared the infection, and no longer test positive for HBsAg, it means your body has cleared the infection.
      If you are still infected, you get get a liver test to find out if the infection is harming your liver. Good luck.

  141. I want to know with out medication hep b paitent lives how many years?if I was infected at 30 when I use to start medication?with medication also how many years I live average

    1. Hello: Many people living with hepatitis B live long and healthy lives and never need any medication. If you are infected, you need to be regularly monitored by a doctor who is knowledgeable about hepatitis B. The doctor should perform tests to see what stage of hepatitis B you are at, and to find out if the infection is harming your liver. Usually, people are treated if they have high viral loads (lots of virus in their bodies) and if the hepatitis B infection is harming their livers. This is found out by a blood test for ALT or SGPT. This is a liver enzyme that damaged liver cells release into the blood when they are damaged. Please talk to your doctor, you may be fine and not require any medication. Good luck.

  142. My friend tests positive to Hepatitis b and his results shows:
    HBeAb 0.25 positive
    HBeAg 0.0 negative
    Dna quantification 79IU/ml
    Dna quantification 459.78copies/ml
    Log value 1.90

    Pls does he needs treatment or not?

    1. Hello: To find out if he needs treatment, his doctor needs to conduct a thorough exam and also determine if the hepatitis B infection is harming his liver. This is shown through a blood test called an ALT (alanine aminotransferase) or SGPT test. When liver cells are damaged, they release ALT (also called SGPT) into the blood. A healthy ALT level is 30 or less.
      Under medical guidelines, a doctor takes into consideration the patient’s family history (if there is any history of liver cancer), his overall physical condition, viral load (HBV DNA) and whether the infection is harming his liver. Only his doctor knows if treatment is called for. Good luck, you are a good friend.

    1. Hello: I’m sorry but no one can predict how long one will live. You can live a long life if you take care of yourself and eat healthy food, and avoid alcohol and smoking. No one but your doctor can predict how a hepatitis B infection will affect your liver. It is important to enjoy your life. Do not let hepatitis B define you, it is just an infection that you happen to have that you need to monitor and treat if you should ever need treatment. Keep getting monitored and enjoy your life. Good luck.

  143. I have two questions 1) I am filling burning pain in my liver area constant pain for all day but the doc say no need medication so what should I do?it has penetrating effects with a sharp objects.is my liver damaging or what I was infected before 4 month and 2)i Am thinking of marriage is it ok

    1. Hello: I am sorry to hear you are experiencing abdominal pain. There are very few nerves around the liver, so often abdominal pain comes from another source, such as the gall bladder. I encourage you to talk to your doctor and describe the pain you are experiencing to see what can be causing it. Many people living with hepatitis B marry. What is important to do is before you marry, make sure your future partner has been tested for hepatitis B and immunized with all three vaccine shots. About one or two months after the third shot, she should be tested for hepatitis B surface antibodies to make sure she is full protected against infection.
      Good luck.

  144. Hi, in October 2014 I run regular check up and I was negative on HBV markers. In 2014 I was completely vaccinated for HBV.
    In May 2015 I’d have pains in abdomen and then I run laboratory. This was findings:
    AST 240, ALT 790, HBsAg 1034, HBsAb negative, Anti HBcIgM 34.03, PCR HBV > 6.704 x 10to8, antiHBeAb negative.
    In October my findings are:
    AST 54, ALT 128, GGT 30, Anti HBcIgM reactive 1.5, ANti Hbe reactive 69.37 sco, HBeAg reactive 964.606 sco.
    Pls Can you explain what happens? (sorry for English, from Europe).

    1. Hello: You may have been newly infected with hepatitis B and the lab test in October 2014 didn’t pick up on the infection yet, or else there was a lab error and you were already infected, I cannot explain it.
      It would appear your immune system is working hard to fight the hepatitis B infection. When a healthy adult is infected, it can take up to six months for the immune system to fight and eradicate the infection. In May, you may have been in the midst of this acute infection phase. In October, you were still infected, which suggests perhaps it’s a chronic infection, but thankfully your ALT levels (which indicate liver damage) have declined. I recommend you talk to your doctor about whether treatment is needed given your elevated ALT levels. I assume you are being monitored on a regular basis. Also, if you can afford it, getting your viral load (HBV DNA) tested might give you and your doctor more information about your hepatitis B. Good luck.

  145. Hi, Please help me to understand what does mean this test.
    Test – HBsAG w/titer CMIA / Result – 3071.21 / Cut off value – 1.000 Reactive.
    Test – Anti HBs CMIA / Result – 0.00 mIU/mL / Cut off value -10.000 Nonreactive.
    Test- HBeAg CMIA / Result – 0.34 / Cut off value 1.000 Nonreactive.
    Test- Anti HBe CMIA / Result – 0.03 / Cut off value -1.000 Reactive.
    Test – Anti HBc IgM CMIA / Result – 0.06 / Cut off value – 1.000 Nonreactive.
    Test – Anti HBc Total CMIA / Result – 8.66 / Cut off value – 1.000 Reactive.

    Thank you

    1. Hello: You test results show you are infected with hepatitis B. However, the fact that you test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antibodies (Anti HBe) shows your immune system is fighting the virus and has created “e” antibodies. This often indicates that your viral load (HBV DNA) may be low or moderate. Have you had an ALT or SGPT (blood) test? This test looks for liver enzymes and an above-normal reading can indicate that the virus is harming your liver cells. Liver cells release ALT or SGPT when they are damaged. Average ALT levels are less than 30 for men and under 19 for women. Good luck.

  146. I have been diagnosed of having hepatitis B infection. My profile as at August 1st, 2015 shows hbeag = negative, hbeab = positive. I had an LFT and test result showed Total BILIRUBIN=40umol/L (High), conjugated bilirubin = 12umol/L(High), ALT(GPT) = 17iu/L, AST(GOT) = 21iu/L, Alkaline phosphatase = 72iu/L, Glutamyl Transferase = 19iu/L, Total protein= 79g/L, Albumin =50g/L (High) . Occasionally, I feel sharp pain in my right upper quadrant and my eyes are yellowish they say is because of the high bilirubin in my blood. They say am chronically infected but less infectious. But am worried about the symptoms am experiencing . My ALT and ASTRO I learnt are normal. What can I do, but my eyes are very yellowish. Any advise. Am currently on a drug called heptovit

    1. Hello: While it is good news that your ALT and AST levels are normal, clearly something is wrong that the whites of your eyes are yellow. We recommend that you see your doctor and discuss your condition. The drug heptovit is an herbal supplement. The Hepatitis B Foundation cannot endorse any herbal supplements unless they are endorsed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and heptovit is not. The problem with herbal supplements is they are not regulated closely, so you can never tell exactly how much of the herbal extract is in the capsule or liquid. Please see your doctor to find out what is causing the yellow tinge in your eyes. Good luck.

  147. my queatuions helps us all why they always delete them
    10hbeag is detected after how many days?
    20hbasg is detected after how many days ?
    3)for babies born with hbasg postive mam they tested postive for hbsag after a minite they are born but what changes it from hbsag potsive and immoglobin?if it is why not given to us?
    40is there a thing called hbeag spontanious serconvertion to hbeab?
    50if one knows he has hbsag and no damage and moniter every three month what are the effectes that hbsag will do to him?life expectany?physicaly?mentaley?
    i have other queations lets first discuss

    1. Hello:
      It can take up to nine weeks for the hepatitis B surface antigen to show up in a lab test, and the hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) shows up quickly after that.
      When a baby or an adult is exposed to the hepatitis B virus through exposure to blood, immediate administration of the first dose and HBIG (immune globulin) are effective to fight off a new infection. However, once we are infected with the virus, neither the vaccine nor the HBIG are effective in spurring our immune system to fight the infection, because it is already present.
      We can spontaneously lose HBeAg and develop “e” antibodies as our immune systems notice the virus and start producing antibodies. The order of hepatitis B antibodies that the immune system produces is: 1. core antibodies, 2. “e” antibodies, and 3. surface antibodies, which indicate we have cleared the infection.
      Many people test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen, but have no liver damage from it. This is called “inactive” hepatitis B. As long as they are monitored regularly (every 3, 6, or 12 months, whatever your doctor recommends) and they eat healthy food and avoid alcohol and cigarettes, they should live a long and healthy life. Good luck.

  148. Hi Sir
    Story is I had jaundice in 2007 with all symptoms. And it diagnosed as HBV infection. After 5 months we did test again and result was as follows

    Hbsag neg (repeated 3 times)
    Hbsab .5 miu/ml
    Hbeag neg
    Hbeab positive

    With normal LFT

    In 2007 we cheked again

    Hbsag non detected (cmia)
    Hbsab 4 miu/ml
    LFT normal

    Note: Hbsag not persist more than six month from the acute infection. There are some questions. Please answer.

    1. Am i consider as chronic carrier of hbv. And i can spred virus.

    Or

    Am I free of infection

  149. Hbsab 4 miu/ml
    Hbsag negative

    LFT normal.

    Is it meant recovery of previous infection? As I had infection in 2007. Reply me please.

    1. Hello: As I indicated in an early response, you have inactive hepatitis B and are at low risk of liver damage. In order to be considered to have cleared hepatitis B, you need 10 to 12 mIU/mL of hepatitis B surface antibodies. Your immune system is working to clear the infection. Keep eating healthy food and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  150. Hi Sir

    Please single advise me

    In 2007 i had acute infection. And i was no longer positive hbsag more than six months. After six months of infection reseult were as below.
    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab .5 miu/ml
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab positive

    LFT was normal

    In 2015 result are

    Hbsag non detective
    Hbsab 4 miu/ml

    LFT is normal

    Am i have infetion?
    Am i free of infection?
    Can i take vaccines. As hbsab not more than 10 miu/ml?
    Do i have need treatment?
    Can i do infect others?

    Sir please answer me. I waiting…

    Thanks

    1. Hello: According to experts, you have cleared the infection if you test negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), which you have, and if you have at least 10 to 12 mIU/mL of hepatitis B surface antibodies. According to your results, you have some surface antibodies (4 mIU/mL) but not enough to be declared totally cleared of infection. But there is good news, your LFT is normal and because you test negative for the surface antigen, your hepatitis B is “inactive.” Have you ever had a viral load test that measured the HBV DNA in your blood? That would indicate if there are any detectable virus in your body.
      A vaccine will not do anything at this point. You probably are at low risk of infecting others, considering you do not test positive for HBsAg, but we always recommend you take precautions, even if the risk of transmission is low. Good luck.

  151. Dear doc hope wiil be OK
    In 2004
    Hbsag was positive
    In 2013
    Hbsag positive
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab positive
    Hbv DNA negative
    Since then no tests only taking vitamin E capsule occasionally what should I do thanks

    1. Hello: It sounds like you are doing well, with undetectable viral load. What you did not indicate was whether you have had any liver damage. This is identified by a blood test for the liver enzyme ALT or SGPT. Damaged liver cells release ALT into the blood when they are damaged by hepatitis B. So continue to eat healthy food, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Thanks.

  152. Hi doc
    My question is abt my bro, he ws under medication for right eye vascularitis fr past 5 mnths,evrything ws going well but in his last visit of doc ….his doc said that recurrence of inflammation in right eye…so his doc suggested to rheumatologist …..there he did some blood work…he deionized
    HBsAg positive…. HbeAg negative, dna test result is 150000 iu/ml…sonograohy normal …endoscopy normal…sgpt 72… My question s abt ,is retinal vascularitis s connected to Hbv…if he takes treatment fr hbv …..his eye problem also solve r nt…. ..how much his liver s infected……thank u……

    1. Hello: I do not know much about links between eye diseases and hepatitis B, however your brother’s SGPT level of 72 is above normal (which is 30 or less for men), which shows some minor liver damage. Also, his viral load is moderately high. Is he receiving medication for his eye problems that is possibly suppressing his immune system? Immune-suppressing treatments are used for certain cancers and rheumatoid arthritis, for example. He should see a liver specialist who is familiar with hepatitis B in the event he needs treatment. Also, he should make sure he eats healthy foods and avoids alcohol and cigarettes.
      Do both you and your brother have hepatitis B? You should make sure your other family members are screened for hepatitis B and immunized if needed. Good luck.

  153. Hello Doc
    I had hbv in 2007 as acute in infection. And i was no longer positive hbsag six months. And result was as follows
    Hbsag neg
    Hbsab .5 miu/ml
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab positive
    LFT was normal.

    In 2015 check again

    Hbsag non detected
    Hbsab 4 miu/ml
    Hbsab lelel as low. And not protective. I am non alcoholic. But i am smoker. Is it possible that smoking may be cause of low hbsab????

    Hbsab lavel may be increase in future. Or hbsag may be positive again? Till now LFT is normal. How can increase hbsab level.

    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab negative
    Above both test repeated 5 time with cmia and elisa method. How it possible both are negative as i exposed the virus.
    Doc says that you are not chronically infetected. Because your hbsag become negative within six months after acute infection.

    Some Doc told me. Once infected hbv never get rid of virus. Is it true. While some says a man recover completely from the infection, if that person become negative within six months. I am very confused one is telling never get rid off, another telling mostly person eliminate the virus by his immune system. Whose one is right or wrong. While botha are qulified and having same degree MD.

    Thanks

    1. Hello: Once we have been infected with hepatitis B, researchers believe our livers continue to have a very low level of virus in them, even if we have developed the hepatitis B surface antibodies. It’s a little like chicken pox, our immune systems keep it under control, but there is always a tiny amount of virus left.
      Your tests show you have inactive hepatitis B. You have cleared the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), which is excellent news, however your immune system hasn’t generated enough hepatitis B surface antibodies to completely get rid of the virus. Experts say you need at least 12 mIU/mL of surface antibodies to have cleared the infection. It is actually very good news that your level of surface antibodies are increasing.
      As you know, smoking weakens our immune system, it would be good for you to stop smoking and protect your health. Good luck.

    1. Hello: Both hepatitis B and hepatitis C infect the liver and can cause liver damage. I don’t think one is more dangerous than the other. Recently, a cure was developed for hepatitis C. Researchers are working hard to develop one for hepatitis B and predict they will in the next few years. Good luck.

  154. Please doctor can u interpret this result for me.
    Hbsag positive
    Hbsab negative
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab positive
    HBcAb positive and normal liver function test

    1. Hello: It appears you have “inactive” hepatitis B that is currently not causing any liver damage, as indicated by the normal liver function test. Because you test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen, it also indicates you may not have many virus in your body. Keep up the good work, and remember to eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  155. Hi Dr,

    Firstly, i congratulate you on maintaining such blog which enlighten patients about their condition and help them make decision..

    I have been diagnosed as HBSAg positive. Further doc has suggest to under go
    virul load test
    HbeAg
    Hbv e Ab
    LFT

    Test results are as below:
    HBsAg – Positive
    HBV DNA – Detected 30175236 IU/ML
    HBeAg – postive 0.817
    HBeAb – Negative 0.461

    LFT:
    SGOT – 38 U/L
    SGPT – 54 U/L
    other readings within the normal range.

    Can you please detail me about my health condition/medication. Can my HBsAg/HBeAg results go normal at any point after future medication? What should be my Diet to improve my Liver conditions , however i am non-alcoholic and non- smoker .

    Thanks in advance.

    1. Hello: You are in the stage of hepatitis B where you have lots of virus in your body and the virus is replicating rapidly in your liver. Are you in your 20s or 30s? If you were infected at birth, many people go through an “immune tolerant” phase where their immune system doesn’t notice the virus. Another indicator of this is the fact you test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg). Your SGPT liver enzyme level is only slightly elevated, which means your immune system hasn’t notice that your liver cells are “occupied” by the virus and it hasn’t started attacking the infected liver cells yet (which makes your SGPT levels go up as your immune system tries to eradicate the infected liver cells.)
      Because you have a high viral load, it’s important for you to practice safer sex (always use a condom) and don’t share your razor, toothbrush, or nail clippers. If you have siblings, they should also be tested for hepatitis B and vaccinated if needed.
      Over time, your immune system will start to fight the hepatitis B infection. When that happens, you will enter an “active” phase of the infection. It is important that you continue to be regularly monitored, especially your liver enzymes, and of course continue to eat healthy foods and avoid cigarettes and alcohol. Treatment is not recommended for people in the “immune tolerant” stage. So take care, and good luck.

      1. Thanks for the detailed explanation. I am 25 years old . I was having TOF by birth (hole in heart) . have undergone surgery thrice in early childhood. One of my lab reports during third surgery at age of 8 years detected Hep B positive. Everything pertaining to that heart disease has been cured after third surgery and also dint require to take any medication after that.

        I am quite unclear on your statement that “treatment is not recommeded for people in the immune tolerant stage” !! Do you mean that its not currently harming my liver function though i dont have any symptoms?

        Just for idea – what would be the medication dr’s suggest me at this stage of disease?

        Thanks.

        1. Hello:
          Ironically, what causes liver damage is when our immune system attacks the hepatitis B-infected liver cells as it tries to eradicate the virus in our liver. However, when we are in the immune-tolerant stage, our young immune systems don’t notice or attack the virus or the infected liver cells. Treatment to reduce the amount of virus in our bodies is not highly beneficial, because we don’t have our immune system joining the fight. Ideally, treatment works when we can achieve a two-pronged attack on the infection–reducing viral load through antiviral treatment while the immune system attacks the infected liver cells. This is a highly complex infection with complex approaches to treatment. Doctors are now experimenting with various antivirals and different approaches to help people who are in the immune-tolerant stage. They predict we should have a cure in a few years. Thank you.

  156. One single query
    Advise me…
    If a person infected in 2007. And he did checked after six month of infection and got result as below

    Hbsag neg
    Hbsab .5 miu/ml
    Hbeag neg
    Hbeab positive
    LFT was normal

    In 2015
    Hbsag non detected
    Hbsag 4 miu/ml
    LFT was within range as normal
    One thing that i couldn’t recognized. As I checked hbv profile only two time, once at after six months of acute infection and secondly after 8 years of infection. All is well…

    Question is

    As I didn’t cheched in betwee 2007 to 2015… Is it possibilities that Hbsab may be positive as in between 2007 to 2015. And finally it reduce as i got only 4 miu/ml.

    So sir
    Tell me that hbsab may be convert positive to low level.

    1. Hello: When our immune systems get rid of the hepatitis B virus, it attacks the infected liver cells and it creates antibodies to eradicate each of the hepatitis B proteins or antigens that make up the virus. The final antibody that the immune system generates to finish off the infection is the hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb). We WANT this antibody to reach levels of at least 12 mIU/mL to show that we’ve totally rid our bodies of the virus. Many people with “inactive” hepatitis B have undetectable hepatitis B surface antigen, (which is very good) but they haven’t quite generated enough hepatitis B antibodies to eradicate the infection. You’re one of those people. Your surface antibodies have been increasing over time, but they haven’t reached the 12 mIU/mL mark yet. So make sure you eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and get monitored regularly to check on the status of your hepatitis B infection. Good luck.

  157. Hello I’m chronic hep b. Just recently I had my liver checked.
    Labs were taken and the results are as follows. HbsAg-reactive,Anti HBs -non reactive,
    HbeAg-non reactive,anti HBe -reactive,anti hav IGm – non reactive,anti-hbc total- reactive,. I would like to know if this results would mean that I need to take medications such as anti viral because for a long time I wasn’t adviced to take medicine. If I will be planning to work in Canada am I admissible in going their or it could be a hindrance because of my status? Please enlighten me. Thnks

    1. Hello: Doctors recommend treatment only if your viral load (HBV DNA) is high and you have signs of liver damage, indicated by a blood test for the liver enzyme ALT. Unfortunately, the lab test results you provided do not include those two reports. From what I understand, Canada will ask about your hepatitis B, but only to determine if you are healthy and receiving any kind of medical care. So, they may ask for a doctor’s report on your liver condition. Good luck.

  158. Hi sir
    I satisfied with you. I have only 4 miu/ml hbsab. Checked as on 2015 dec with hbsag negative. Is it possible that level of hbsab may be decrease or increace as well as time is passing… Or hbsag, which is quite negative, may pe possible change to positive as with the pass of age.

    Should I repeat hbsab level again?

    Dr advised me there is no need to checked hbv dna as i got hbsag negative and alt and ast also normal. Is it righg decision?

    Thanks Dr.

    1. Hello: Current medical guidelines recommend that you continue to have your liver enzymes tested (ALT) at least once a year, and have your HBsAb and HBsAg tested also. If you are sick from an illness unrelated to hepatitis B that weakens your immune system, you could experience a resurgence in hepatitis B, so monitoring is important each year, or more often if you have signs of liver damage. Good luck.

  159. Please give me single answer. When i suffering from another disease like cold cough for a long Period, and in such condition I checked hbsab, is there possibilities that my immune system would be week so that I found low level of hbsab like 4 miu/ml.

    And now I am free of cold and cough and feel healthy. So that, should I go for further hbsab test.

    One remember

    I found

    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab 4 miu/ml

    Above test done at that time when I was facing anoghe illness like cold and cough for a long period. And now I am feeling very healthy and rid off from chronic cough. If I go for further test hbsab, may be possible I got some increasing hbsab level.

    Thanks

    1. Hello: A cold is not likely to affect the level of hepatitis B surface antibodies in your body. The best thing you can do is eat healthy foods, exercise, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Thank you.

  160. Any hope….

    In future….

    As I have negative for hbsag and also contain low lavel of hbsab like 4 miu/ml. One remember I was no longer positive more than six months after acute infection. So as per Dr advise I am not consider as chronic carrier. Is it right? Sir such me candidate going to frustation because no declarin such condition of hbv infection due to hbsag negative and 4 miu/ml hbsab. Might be virus remains in my body as very low quantity or body may be free of infection as per my Dr expressions.

    So Sir please tell me a very sensitive test that define about virus… Either remains in body or a free of infection.

    Is there some hope that in future hbsab level will be increase as Dr declare me infection free…

    Please sir reply me as I am very disappointed…

    Sorry for a lot of query. And hope don’t mind Sir…

    Thanks

  161. This my hep b profile.
    HBcAB positive
    HBcIGM negative
    HBsAg reactive
    HBsAb negative
    Surface Ab value 1.00
    HBeAg negative
    HBeAb. Positive.
    Pls what does this mean.

    1. Hello: As you know, you have hepatitis B, however the fact you have developed the hepatitis B “e” antibody (HBeAb) means your body is fighting the infection. Is this the first time you have been tested for hepatitis B? If you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it means you are chronically infected. You should be monitored regularly at least every year if not more often.
      What you did not mention is what your liver enzyme (ALT or SGPT) tests show. Do you know if they indicate any signs of liver damage? This is a very important test to show if the infection is damaging your liver. Liver cells, when they are damaged or die, release ALT into the blood, so an ALT test shows the health of your liver.
      Good luck.

  162. I have 4 miu/ml hbsab…

    I am non alcoholic. But I am little smokers. I have question

    Is smoking is cause of low level of hbsab?

    1. Hello: Smoking stresses our immune system and introduces toxins to our body, which must be processed by our livers. Smoking certainly does not help our bodies eradicate the virus and generate hepatitis B surface antibodies. I cannot guarantee you would generate more surface antibodies if you stopped smoking, but your chances of clearing the infection would definitely improve. Good luck.

  163. Complete story in short….

    I had acute infection in 2007. And within six month. I got repeated result by elisa and cmia method almost 5 time.

    In 2007. After 5 months of acute infection.

    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab .5 miu/ml
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab positive
    LFT normal

    In between 2007 to 2015 no one test done…

    In 2015 dec. I did check hbv status and result found as below

    Hbsag non detected
    Hbsab 4 miu/ml
    LFT normal

    On behalf of above test my Doc told me no need to hbv dna test.

    Sir, i can’t understand what is my actual stage.

    Am I consider as chronic carrier?
    Or
    Can I spread infection to others in such condition.

    Is there any hope… That I have only 4 miu/ml hbsab. Is may be increase in future. Or remains same… Or may be decrease??

    As I got now. Hbsag negative. Please tell me. In future, Is may be change negative to positive? I newer take a single medicine till now.

    Thanks

  164. Hi Dr.
    I want to know. Hbsab is fluctuate as overtime.
    As i Had hbv infection in 2007. And within six months, I found hbsag negative and hbsab .5 ium/ml. After that no one test done. I dont know, what happen with hbsab. How much up and down.

    But in 2015 i repeat hbsag and hbsab again. And further report
    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab 4 miu/ml

    Is there any possibility that hbsab lavel more than 10 in between 2007 to 2015. As I did not checked in mention period. And I did checked in 2015 dec, hbsab level found 4 miu/ml. I read here hbsab may be fluctuate. Its hard luck to me that I newer check for last 8 year. So what happened with hbsab titre, don’t know…

  165. Hi
    I did my heb B profile and below are the results
    HBsAg reactive at the result column but non-reactive at the expected result column
    HBsAb non-reactive
    HBeAg non-reactive
    HBeAb reactive
    HBcAb reactive
    The following are also the result of my liver function test
    Total protein 83.4 g/L
    Albumin 55.7 g/L
    Globulin 27.7 g/L
    Alkaline phosphatase 99.8 U/L
    AST 3.0U/L
    ALT 13.0U/L
    GGT 13.0 U/L
    Total bilirubin 3.6 Umol/L
    Direct bilirubin 1.7 Umol/L
    Indirect bilirubin 1.9 Umol/L
    I did this test in October 2015. My Dr asked me not to worry because my liver is in a good state and the that the virus are inactive and they not in the replicating phase.
    Please do i still need to check my viral load? Do have the chance of infecting my partner? Do I need to be on any treatment? How often should i have this test done?
    Thank you

    1. Hello: Based on your ALT test, you are not experiencing any liver damage and do not require treatment, though of course only your doctor can give you an accurate diagnosis. “Normal” ALT levels for women are 19 and less. However, it is always a good idea to know your viral load, even if your liver enzymes are normal. Any time you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you are capable if transmitting the infection, so you should practice safe sex with your partner, and make sure they’re immunized. Your hepatitis B status and ALT levels should be tested every six to 12 months, or more frequently if you have a high viral load or are experiencing liver damage. Good luck.

  166. Im looking at adopting a child and am not sure if they have a form of hepatitis or not. Here are the test results:
    Item Result S/C.O. Reference
    HBsAg negative .095 <1
    HBsAb Negative .639 <1
    HBeAg Negative .034 1
    HBvAB Positive .802 >1
    RPR Negative Negative
    Anti-tp Negative .047 <1
    1 month later
    HBV-DNA <500 copy/ml 0-500

    HBV vaccine was given 2 months & 1 month before the test

    Thank you so much

    1. Hello: I’m sorry but I am confused by the test results. Usually, the key indicators of a hepatitis B infection is a positive HBsAg test (the child’s test was negative) and detectable viral load or HBV DNA. It appears the child’s HBsAg test was negative, but yet the “e” antibody test was positive and the HBV DNA seems to suggest there was a detectable viral load. All of this may result from the hepatitis B vaccine. I believe the child is not infected. You should follow your heart, but if you are worried ask for one more test. Good luck.

  167. Ok….I think I typed in the results incorrectly.
    Here they are:
    HBsAg neg .095
    HBsAb neg .639
    HbeAg neg .034
    HBeAb Pos .390
    HBcAb Pos .802
    RPR neg neg
    Anti-tp neg .047
    1 month later
    HBV DNA <500
    BUT, I don't see that the child received a hep B vaccine – just the HBV vaccine, OPV & DPT. Or is there Hep B in the HBV vaccine?
    Thank
    You
    So much for your help!

    1. Hello: It appears the child has been exposed to hepatitis B, as indicated by the positive tests for the “e” antibody and the core antibody. He (or she) may have inactive hepatitis B, and may have lost the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), but has not yet developed enough hepatitis B antibodies (HBsAb) to be picked up in a lab test. I’m completely confused by the HBV DNA less than 500 indication. Ideally it would be good to have an ALT or SGPT test to show if there is any liver damage, but if the viral load is low and there’s undetectable HBsAg, it would probably come out healthy. Good luck, wish we could help more.

  168. If a person had acute hbv infection in past. And within six months hbsag become negative… .

    After 7 years of infection. Result shows as below.
    Hbsag non detected
    Hbsab 4 miu/ml
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab postive
    LFT normal

    On behalf of above result. A person can infect to others by his sliva, semen. Please answer.

    Thanks

    1. Hello: Your past resolved acute HBV infection seems to continue to concern you. Based on all of the test results you have shared, there is no reason to believe you have a current infection or that you are infectious to others.
      If you wish you can talk to your doctor about getting an HBV DNA test. When this comes back negative, then hopefully you can let it go. You cannot infect anyone with HBV if you recovered from a past infection, just like you cannot give someone the measles if you had it as a child and recovered. I’m afraid I don’t have much more I can say about this. I would suggest that you speak to your doctor. Good luck.

  169. One more question!
    I don’t have that specific ALT or SGPT test but I do have blood panel results. Would that give any indication? LYM is 2.7, LYM% is 38, WBC is 7.2
    Is there another part of a panel that would be helpful?
    Thanks again!!

    1. Hello: The blood panel tests do not look at liver health, you need the ALT/SGPT test (which is a blood test) to see if you are experiencing any liver damage from the infection. Good luck.

  170. Hello,i was tested for hep b and the result was

    Hbsag non reactive
    Hbsab non reactive
    Hbcab reactive

    What does this mean?am i contagious?will my sexual partner get infected?
    Its been bothering me for quite sometime,i really appreciate your answer.
    Thank you so much.

    1. Hello: The positive or “reactive” test result for Hbcab – the hepatitis B core antibody – means you have been infected at some point. You may be in an “inactive” infection phase where you don’t have hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), but your immune system hasn’t generate enough hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb) to totally eradicate the virus. I recommend you talk to your doctor and have your viral load (HBV DNA) tested, as this will give you another picture of your infection status. Good luck.

  171. I had sex with hep b postive lady after 1 hour i go for cgeck up i am also hbsag postive?so this kills me Quikely

    1. Hello: Have you been vaccinated against hepatitis B? If you haven’t, I recommend you immediately get vaccinated to protect you now and for the rest of your lives. It can take several weeks for a lab to see if you have become infected. So please practice safe sex from now on, and get immunized. Good luck.

  172. Hi Dr

    If a person pecome hbsag negative or no longer positive with hbsag, but immune system doesn’t generated egough hbsAb. Hbsab just like 4 miu/ml.

    As you written in earlier post many time. If hbsag remains positive more than six month consider as chronic infection.

    As I getting repeated report hbsag negative within six months from the onset of symptoms. So that am I also consider chronic candidate of hbv.

    Why my test hbsag shows negative with hbsab 4 miu/ml. Which is totally frustrate me. Because No one idea that virus is in my body or not.

    In such above condition a candidate, how much living long, while LFT is normal.

    Why the doctor told, a person become hbsag negative. Never consider chronic carrier. I become hbsag negative within six month, but as previous reply by you I am inactive carrier. I am not getting your point.

    If a person has 12 miu/ml hbsab, is may be fluctuate and come down as 4 miu/ml in future. Fluctuations of hbsag and hbsab is common?

    Please tell me what is black jaundice. What is medical name of black jaundice.

    Thanks
    I really appreciate with you. You may solve of a lot of query for people. I pray to God for better health.

    1. Hello: Following infection with hepatitis B, until you have achieved a hepatitis B surface antibody level of 12 mIU/mL, you have not totally eradicated the infection. Your immune system has not been able to totally clear the infection. I do not have information about black jaundice. Good luck.

  173. Dr. I was about to donate blood to my relative and took decided to have Hep b test. Below is the result.
    HbsAg……..Reactive
    HbsAb………Reactive
    HBeAg…..Non reactive
    HbeAb……Reactive
    HbcAb….. Reactive.
    Also
    Also i have a liver function test with
    Albumin as 43.1,Globulins 49.2
    Total protein 92.3
    Alt 75.2
    AST 99.7
    Direct bil 26.4
    INE.bil 23.5
    Total bil 49.9
    GAMMA GT 123.2.
    Please Doc. Can offer a detail comentary on the above lab test form me.
    Thank you ver y much form tour great job.

    1. Hello: When you test positive (reactive) for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. When healthy adults are infected, it takes about six months for their immune systems to get rid of the infection. When we’re infected as children, our immature immune systems don’t notice or attack the virus, and the infection becomes chronic or long-term. It is important that you are tested again for hepatitis B in six months to find out if you have a chronic or acute (short-term) infection. Also, are you sure you’re “reactive” for the hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb)? It’s unusual to test positive for both the surface antibody and antigen.
      Your ALT level, which indicates liver damage, is elevated at 75. Usually normal ALT for men is 30 or less. This could be caused by hepatitis B, or some other cause. It is important for you to eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and make sure your family members are tested and vaccinated if needed. Also remember to practice safe sex, as body fluids can transmit the infection. Good luck.

  174. Hello again,you said that im maybe in inactive phase,i had research regarding my result,with positive hep b core but both hbsag and hbsab was negative,i’ve come to know that there’s possibility that my result is false positive and i can have vaccine for protection.
    Is this really possible?

    1. Hello: It is possible to be negative for both the surface antigen and antibody, as I explained. If you have doubts about the test result, simply have them repeated six months after your last test. Good luck.

  175. I have
    Afp 21
    hbsag 14567 and
    hbcab Dna 860
    hbeag negative
    hbeab positive
    hbsab negative
    Alt normal
    Fibroscan normal
    what medication should I take the doctor say no need but I have pain around liver area city scan is normal,my stomach and my right leg are burning at night time I have too much pain what should I do please help me what medication should I start afp and hbsag are very high?what other test should I take?hiw can I lower hbsag?please help me I have pain around liver other body parts I check and they are normal?with this result how long do you think I have been infected?

    1. Hello: Hepatitis B very rarely causes any abdominal discomfort. The liver has very few sensory nerves, so even if it’s infected, usually we feel no pain or discomfort. Given that your liver tests appear to show no damage, I recommend you talk to your doctor to see what else might be causing your symptoms.
      Because you have no signs of liver damage, most doctors would not recommend treatment. You need a combination of high viral load (HBV DNA) and signs of liver damage to qualify for treatment. Please talk to your doctor, and remember to eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  176. Hbv can be transmitted with saliva,semen,if some lady suck my thing,licking.please tell me which methods transfer

    1. Hello: Saliva does not transmit hepatitis B, unless your gums are bleeding or you have a cut or sore in your both. However, blood and semen do contain the virus and can spread infection. Good luck.

    1. Hello: Average ALT for men can range up to 50, depending on the lab. Medical guidelines say 30 or less, but some labs classify a level of 50 or less as healthy. So, 75 is elevated, but not alarmingly. ALTs can increase if you have been exposed to toxic chemicals, or drank a lot of alcohol, for example. So it’s important to follow your ALT levels over time and not rely on just one test. Good luck.

  177. Within six months of infection

    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab .5 miu/ml

    As well as time is paasing in 2015

    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab 4 miu/ml

    Meant that level of hbsab being increase with the pass of age.

    Dr! Any hope in future it will rise upto 10 miu/ml for declaring the totally eradicate the infection as per hbv guideline.

    How much percentage of people. Which dovelop reactive hbsag in such this condition.

    Level of 4 miu/ml. Is considering no number of surface antibodies in blood?

    Level of 4 miu/ml. Is considered as a person has surface antibody in blood?

    What difference between 0 miu/ml and 4 miu/ml. While both are not protective.

    Thanks

    1. Hello: No one can predict if your hepatitis B surface antibody level (HBsAb) will rise. It depends on the strength of your immune system. Be happy that you have inactive hepatitis B and test negative for the surface antigen. Thank you.

  178. I am hepatitis b positive I know it almost 9 month now,I donot start treatment yet the doctors say no need,should I marry or not?i want your opinion especially those who marry can I have baby?this virus has no side effects on me my wife or my baby if I marry?

    1. Hello: Yes, you can marry and have children if you have hepatitis B. But there are some important steps to take to make sure your partner and your future children do not become infected. Before you marry or have sexual relations, you must make sure your partner is vaccinated against hepatitis B and has enough hepatitis B antibodies (also called titers) to protect them. Have them go to a doctor and get screened for hepatitis B. If they are not infected and haven’t been vaccinated in the past, they should get the three shots of the vaccine. (They may have been immunized during childhood.) The second shot is given 30 days after the first, and the third shot is given six months after the first shot. Good luck.

  179. How long do you think I was infected?
    After I wAs exposed in sex with a blood the next day after 24 hours I go for Check up and found out hbsag positive 17580 out/ml hbeag negative hbvdna 870 hbeab negative and hbcab positive,I have questions I ask my self
    1) is the window period for hep b correct always befor I was yearly check up. And hbsag negative after blood exposed during sex the next day this happen ?
    2)hbsag can be detected the list how long?
    3)how long i takes hbsag to be high like this?
    4)hbeag(+) converts to hbeag (-)after how long?
    5)hbeab(-) converts to hbeab (+) after how long?
    Please answer all questions one by one just tell me what you think ok?

    1. Hello: Generally, it takes several weeks after exposure to the hepatitis B virus for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) to show up in a lab test. If you tested positive for HBsAg one or two days after having sex, it’s likely that you infected before this sexual encounter. Also, it can take several weeks or even months for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) to disappear and the “e” antibody (HBeAb) to appear, so it appears you were infected much earlier. Good luck.

  180. What difference between hbsab titre 0 miu/ml and 4 miu/ml. While both are not protective. And both are consider as non reative.

  181. Hello Dr.

    As per you and other medical practioner, a person remainsremains positive with hbsag consider as chronic infection.

    In my case I was no longer postive more than six months. And become negative from hbsag. But not dovelop enough hbsab. I have only 4 miu/ml hbsab.

    I want to know, as per your statement “if hbsag not persist more than six months” not consider chronic infection.

    What is my actual condition. Please reply…

    I have chronic infection or not. On behalf of below test result. While hbsag first time detected in 2007.

    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab 4 miu/ml

    LFT is normal till now.

    Thanks.

    1. Hello: As we have indicated earlier, until you have developed at least 10 miu/mL of hepatitis B surface antibodies, you are not considered to have completely cleared your hepatitis B infection. However, you have inactive hepatitis B and are healthy, which you should be thankful for. Good luck.

  182. How long I was infected?
    With my result how long do you think I was infected
    hbsag positive
    hbcab Positive
    hbeag negative
    hbeab positive
    hbsab negative
    I was not active in sex,non of my family is infected how I got this virus?

    1. Hello: I’m sorry but it’s impossible to judge from these lab results how long you have been infected. Was this your first positive hepatitis B test result? Have you tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months? If so, it means you have a chronic infection and you may have been infected at birth or during early childhood. It’s very difficult to tell, in some families some siblings are infected while others are not. It depends on the mother’s viral load at the time of delivery and whether they got the hepatitis B vaccine at birth. Good luck.

  183. Hello. Please interpret my result. I am 29 years old I learned that I am Hepa B positive when I had my pregnancy test 7 months ago. So as of now, I am not sure if this is acute or chronic since the test was my first time. And my OB told me to wait until I delivered my baby. Also, we already discussed the possibility of transmitting the virus to my baby that is why we yhave a scheduled vaccine for my baby during my delivery. This is my lab test result:

    HBsAg with Titer (CMIA) – 3182.05 REACTIVE
    Anti HBs (CMIA) – 0.31 NON REACTIVE
    HBeAg (CMIA) – 0.37 NON REACTIVE
    Anti HBe (CMIA) – 0.01 REACTIVE
    Anti HBc IgM (CMIA) – 0.05 NON REACTIVE
    Anti HBC Total (CMIA) – 10.45 REACTIVE

    I am on schedule to do my HBV-DNA.

    Can you please tell me if I am highly infectious based on my results? I do not know if I infected my husband since he is not yet doing his blood tests.

    1. Hello: To find out if you have a chronic or acute infection, you should be retested immediately for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). If you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it means you have a long-term or chronic infection and were probably infected during childhood.
      I am glad you are getting a viral load (HBV DNA) test. If your viral load is high (more than 200,000 IU/mL HBV DNA), doctors recommend that you take antivirals during the last trimester of your pregnancy to bring down your viral load and reduce the risk your baby will be infected. The vaccine is very effective, but when mothers have very high viral loads, the vaccine may not be enough to halt mother-to-child infection. For more information on this, please visit http://hepbblog.org/2015/06/25/expert-calls-for-viral-load-testing-in-all-pregnant-women-with-hepatitis-b/
      Also, medical guidelines about treating pregnant women with antivirals are found at http://www.aasld.org/sites/default/files/guideline_documents/hep28156.pdf
      Good luck.

      1. Thank you for your reply. I really appreciate it. I have another concern, which is my husband. I believe that he has no HBV even before since he is working in Middle East for quite some time and I am pretty sure that the govt there is very strict when it comes to this virus. My question is, based on my result without my HBVDNA can you tell me if I am highly infectious? Did I passed it to him immediately after I conceived? I am not sure if he has a vaccine but he is healthy and do not smoke mor drink alcohols. I am really concerned because it might affect his work. He will be taking his annual medical next month on his company and I am really praying that he is negative. 🙁

  184. Hello,
    Kindly interprete this result. I’m confused my niece was just diagnosed and has this result:

    HBS AG – positive
    HBS AB – negative
    HBE AG – negative
    HBE AB – negative
    HBC AB – positive

    1. Hello: These results show she is currently infected with hepatitis B because she tests positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). However, because she tested negative for the “e” antigen (HBeAg) and positive for the “e” antibody (HBeAb), it means her viral load may not be very high. However, more test results are needed to make sure the virus is not harming her liver. We recommend if possible that she get the ALT/SGPT blood test that shows if the infection is harming the liver. When liver cells are damaged, they release ALT into the bloodstream. Healthy ALT levels are less than 19 in women. Also, if it’s available, she should get a viral load (HBV DNA) test to see how much HBV she has in her body. Good luck.

    1. Hello: Please tell us which hepatitis B antigen and antibody you have tested positive for and we can answer that question. The major antigens and antibodies you are tested for are the surface, “e” and core antigen and antibody. Thank you.

  185. if you have hep b now and had sex with another hep b guy unprotected what will happen?is there any side effects?

    1. Hello: Because you are already infected, the fact you may have been exposed to hepatitis B again should pose no risk, according to our medical advisor. However, keep in mind that every time you have unprotected sex, you could be exposed to other sexually transmitted infections ranging from HIV to chlamydia. Good luck.

  186. HI.. I had a series of Hep b vaccine last 2010 (i believe).

    Last 2015, when I had a hep profile it shows.

    Hep B Surface Antibody Titer 42.5
    Hep B Core Antibody (total) = Positive
    Hep B envelop antibody= Positive
    Hep B envelop antigen =Negative
    HBS AG Screening = Negative.

    Then first they told me to get 1 dose of vaccine

    After that, just recently i was had my profile checked again.

    Hep B Surface Antibody Titer = 11.3
    Hep B Core Antibody (total) = Positive
    Hep B Core Antibody (IgM) = Negative
    Hep B envelop antibody= Positive
    Hep B envelop antigen =Negative
    HBS AG Screening = Negative.

    PLease help..

    1. Hello: These test results show that at some point you were infected with hepatitis B. The fact you have tested positive for the hepatitis B core antibody and “e” or envelop antibody proves that. The good news is you have cleared the infection, indicated by your positive hepatitis B surface antibody result. Good luck.

      1. Will i be able to immigrate to australia or canada?

        And how come I was infected by it? I nean i have a completed vaccine. My titer before was high. I should have been immuned by it.

        When you say cleared, do you I am naturally immuned?

        1. Hello: Yes you can immigrate to any country. As I explained, you at some point were infected with hepatitis B and you cleared the infection on your own. Now, you are naturally immune because you have the hepatitis B surface antibody. You probably developed the surface antibody when cleared the infection, it had nothing to do with the vaccination.
          Good luck.

          1. Revently, I have done my medical for contract renewal and the results are the followong:

            Hep B Surface Antibody Titer = 19
            Hep B Core Antibody (total) = Positive
            Hep B Core Antibody (IgM) = Negative
            Hep B envelop antibody= Positive
            Hep B envelop antigen =Negative
            HBS AG Screening = Negative.
            ALT = 44

            I am quite concern about my ALT, which is the only abnormal result in my liver function test.. Is this significant? Is my liver damaged? Is there anyway it can go back to mormal? What about its relation from my past hep b infection?

          2. Hello: Normal ALT levels are 30 or less for men and 19 or less for women. However, keep in mind that every lab has their own “healthy” range that can reach up to 50. Find out what range your lab characterizes as healthy, and keep getting monitored as your doctor recommends. ALT levels can rise for reasons unrelated to hepatitis B, including alcohol abuse, medication, and other illnesses. Good luck.

    1. Hello: Your results show you are chronically infected with hepatitis B. Whether or not you require treatment depends on several factors, including age, gender, your viral load (HBV DNA) and whether the infection is causing any liver damage. Your liver releases the enzyme ALT (or SGPT) when it is damaged. ALT is measured in a simple blood test. You should be monitored regularly for liver damage and viral load, if those tests are available to you, and also be sure to eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and smoking. Good luck.

  187. Helo sir. My results are the ff. Anti hbs reactive 10.42. Hbsag nonreactive. Anti hbe nonreactive…hbeag non reactive.anti hbc igm non reactive…anti hbc igg reactive .109.. a fp 1.39iu/ml. I have a vaccine of hepa b…can u translate this for me? TNX

    1. Hello: Your results show you appear to be protected against hepatitis B. The fact you test positive (reactive) for the hepatitis B surface antibody demonstrates this. I am confused your other results, it appears you may have been exposed to hepatitis B in the past, but your immune system was able to clear the infection. Good luck.

  188. Hello sir
    In 2007 i had acute infection and after 5 months result was as below

    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab .5 miu/ml
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab positive

    LFT was normal

    I check again in dec 2015

    Hbsag non detected
    Hbasb 4 miu/ml
    LFT normal

    On behalf of above test whats my actual condition. There are some questions. Please reply me one by one. I realy appreciate….

    1. Am I have chronic infection?
    2. Can I spread by sex?
    3. I am on liver damage risk?
    4. Hbsab may be rise upto protective lavel in future?
    5. In the lack of proper information. Unprotected sex with partner. While she is not vaccinated. And having kids. But during delivery period, she tested for hbv. And result shows negative. In such case any harm mother to kids?
    6. While I am a carrier or occult as well as not found enough hbsab level. But my wife is not infetected. Thats meant occult can’t spred by sexual activities?

    Thanks

    1. Hello:
      1. Am I have chronic infection? Yes, though you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you are considered to have a chronic (though inactive) infection until your immune system generates at leave 12 mIU/mL of hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb).
      2. Can I spread by sex? Yes, though your viral load and risk of transmission is low, you can still transmit the virus. And, you want to practice safe sex in order to protect yourself and your partner.
      3. I am on liver damage risk? Your risk is much lower, because your infection is “inactive,” but you are still at risk of liver damage and need to be monitored regularly.
      4. Hbsab may be rise upto protective lavel in future? Yes, over time some people eventually generate enough surface antibodies to clear the infection. Eating healthy foods and avoiding alcohol and cigarettes can help.
      5. In the lack of proper information. Unprotected sex with partner. While she is not vaccinated. And having kids. But during delivery period, she tested for hbv. And result shows negative. In such case any harm mother to kids? Yes, I hope the baby was vaccinated within 12 hours of birth. The mother may have been experiencing an acute infection during her pregnancy. Please have the baby tested for hepatitis B, and make sure he or she is vaccinated if needed.
      6. While I am a carrier or occult as well as not found enough hbsab level. But my wife is not infetected. Thats meant occult can’t spred by sexual activities? You can still spread hepatitis B even if your HBsAg levels are undetectable. Have you had a viral load test? That will give the true picture of how much virus you have in your body.
      Good luck.

  189. If I am inactive carrier with hbsag negative. And my wife not vaccinated. Unprotected sex is done several time. But my wife is not infected till now. I having 2 kids one is 5 year old and other is 2 year old.

    During delivery wife tested with elisa method and result shown as negative. Because i belong to rural area and don’t have proper knowledge of hbv infectoion also there is not knolegebale Dr. there.

    So, at the time of delivery hbv vaccines not given to both baby. But after one months of delivery 3 vaccine shot done accordingly.

    In such case, I am inactive carrier with hbsag negative (as I am having only 4 miu/ml hbsab). But my wife is negative with hbv infection.

    In such condition she gave birth two baby. Is there possibility, she can give infection to baby, while she is negative with hbsag and never faced any symptom of jaundice.

    Yes Dr. I am worried father and confirm going to test for babies. Dear Sir on behalf of abve circumstance. Can You explain about my childs…

    I really appreciate you.
    And very thankful for your very valuable and informative blog.

    Thanks …..

    1. Hello: Have you had the children tested for hepatitis B after their immunizations? And, has your wife been vaccinated against hepatitis B? I highly recommend you get the children tested to be sure –though their risk of infection is low because your wife has been negative–and of course get your wife tested and immunized. Many people infected with hepatitis B never experience jaundice, so don’t assume people with hepatitis B have symptoms. Good luck.

  190. Hiii,

    Me and my wife both are positive for hep b our results are hbsag positive and anti hbc igm value is 0.17 of my wife and 0.04 was mine hbv dna level high
    Now what is my question we HV acute or chronic infection?? And never ever we can do unprotected sex??? Is there any risk if we do unprotected sex??

    1. Hello: To determine if you have an acute or chronic infection, you must be tested over a six-month period. If you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months, it means you have a long-term or chronic infection and were probably infected at birth or during childhood. It is important that you are both monitored regularly, and also get your liver enzyme (ALT or SGPT) blood test done to see if the infection is harming your liver. When liver cells are damaged, they release ALT/SGPT into the bloodstream. Normal ALT levels are 30 and less for men and 19 and less for women. Because you are both infected, you can have unprotected sex. Good luck.

  191. good eve doctor.

    kindly read my results as if 16 feb 2016

    01.hbsg .positive
    02.hbeag.negative
    03.anti hbe .negative
    04.sgpt.81 and sgot 56
    liver ultra sound.within normal size

    re test dated 26 feb 2016
    2nd opinion

    01.hbeag.negative
    02.anti hbe positive
    03.sgpt64.sgot 36
    04.hbv viral load 7,8000.00

    doctor recommend me to take med for one year.pls advise about my result and do i have a chance to recover as soon as possible.since my profile is ok except my viral load.what should i do now.is it safe to use the anti viral which is entecavir?

    thanks jeery

    1. Hello: Your recent tests show your liver enzymes are very slightly elevated, and your viral load is elevated, considering you test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antibody (HBeAg). Your doctor would like to put you on antivirals to reduce your viral load. Current medical guidelines recommend either tenofovir (Viread) or entecavir, which in the U.S. is now available as a generic drug. Entecavir is definitely recommended. Don’t forget to eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and get monitored regularly so you and your doctor can monitor the effect of the antiviral on your viral load. Good luck.

  192. hi doct.kindly explain my result.

    as of 16 feb
    hbasg .positive
    hbeag.negative
    anti hbe.negative
    sgpt

    1. Hello: As you know you are currently infected by virtue of your HBsAg positive test. Please include your other test results, including your SGPT level, for more information. Thank you.

  193. Dr
    I had lab work done and was referred to a GI doctor. It was never explained to me what the labs mean. I know its something to do with the liver. Please help me understand what all this means .

    UIBC- 301
    RBC- 30.8
    Hep B core lgG- N
    Hep A antibody total-N
    Hep A antibody IgM- N
    Hep B core antibody total- reactive
    SGPT-67

      1. Hello: The elevated liver enzyme levels are concerning, but it could be linked to childbirth. It’s important to get the full hepatitis B tests performed and review them with your doctor. Good luck.

    1. Hello: There are a few hepatitis B-related results missing, but I can tell you that because you tested positive or reactive for the hepatitis B core antibody, it means you have been exposed to the hepatitis B virus at some point. What is missing is information showing if you are currently infected. If you are infected, you would test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). If you have a resolved infection, you would test positive for the hepatitis B surface antibody. Your specialist will undoubtedly test you for these antigens and antibodies. The tests show you tested negative for the hepatitis A antibody, which means you haven’t been exposed to the virus, but you need to be vaccinated against it. Also, your liver enzyme (SGPT) is elevated, showing you have minor liver damage at this time. Our liver cells release SGPT when they are damaged. Normal ALT (also called SGPT) levels are 19 or less for women, though this amount can vary with your lab. Good luck.

  194. Hello, i am 29 male i have HBS non-reactive for years, i have tested my blood the result was reactive > 1.3, and 3 month before it was 3.7 reactive.
    Please help me out, am i getting better or ?????????

    1. Hello: Had you at one point tested positive or reactive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsASg), before you tested nonreactive for several years? It is not uncommon for people with “inactive” hepatitis B to test undetectable for HBsAg, and then test positive for it, though at low levels. In an inactive infection, our immune systems keep the virus at very low levels. However, there may be times when HBsAg may increase in numbers, either because our immune systems were fighting another infection, or perhaps the lab that performs your test is now using more precise equipment. What is important is that your viral load (HBV DNA) and your liver enzymes (ALT/SGPT) are tested regularly to make sure your infection has not become active or is harming your liver. Good luck.

  195. Hello DR.
    I putting here hbv steps one by one.

    Figure 1
    ————————————————————
    In 2007 had acute Hbv infection. After 5 months result are below.
    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab .5 miu/ml
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab positive
    LFT normal
    ————————————————————
    Figure 2
    ————————————————————-
    Between 2007 to 2015
    No one test done for hbv. So, Dr. Don’t know about infection. Hbsab, how much rise or decline.
    ————————————————————-
    Figure 3
    ————————————————————
    In 2016. Checked again. Result are below.
    Hbsag non detected
    Hbsab 4miu/ml
    LFT normal
    ————————————————————-
    Discussion: Yes on behalf figure 3 result. I am consider inactive carrier of hbv. Because don’t have enough hbsab level. Dr., My question is that According to medical practioner hbsab level mah be increase or decrease overtime. So Sir, as I mentioned in figure 3 no test done. Can we assume in between 2007 to 2015 hbsab level mayh be more than 10 miu/ml. And according to figure 3, it will decline overtime.

    I wang to know. May Hbsab increase in future.

    Thanks

  196. Hi doctor
    Could you please explain the difference between hep b core serum lgG and hep b core antibody? Thank you

    1. Hello: The hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) appears shortly after hepatitis B infection, about the same as appearance of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). When first infected, the anti-HBc is made up of the IgM class followed by appearance of IgG, for which there is no commercial lab test. The anti-HBc total antibodies test, which detects both IgM and IgG antibodies, and the test for anti-HBc IgM antibodies may be the only markers of a recent hepatitis B infection detectable in the “window period,” after the immune system clears HBsAg and before it develops surface antibodies. Thank you.

    1. Hello: Your test results show you are currently infected with hepatitis B because you’ve tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). It is impossible to know when you were infected. When we’re infected as newborns or children, it can develop into a long-term or chronic infection because our immature immune systems don’t recognize the virus. When we’re infected as healthy adults, our immune system recognizes the infection and is able to clear it within six to eight months. The first thing to do is find out if your infection is recent (acute) or chronic. To do that, get tested again in about six months. If you are still positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it may mean that you have a chronic infection and were infected during childhood.
      What you did not include was a liver enzyme (ALT or SGPT) test result. Liver cells release the ALT enzyme when they’re damaged. When you return for another hepatitis B test, make sure they do a blood test for ALT to make sure the virus is not harming your liver. Good luck.

  197. Ples my lab test is HBsAg=+and HBsAb=- HBeAg=-and HBeAb=+and HBcAb=- ples can you explain it to me .thanks

    1. Hello: If you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Is this the first time you’ve ever tested positive for hepatitis B? When we’re infected with hepatitis B as newborns or children, it can develop into a long-term or chronic infection because our immature immune systems don’t recognize the virus. When we’re infected as healthy adults, our immune system recognizes the infection and is able to clear it within six to eight months. The first thing to do is find out if your infection is recent (acute) or chronic. To do that, get tested again in about six months. If you are still positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it may mean that you have a chronic infection and were infected during childhood. Also, make sure you have your ALT or SGPT (liver enzymes) tested during your next lab test to make sure the infection is not harming your liver. Thank you.

  198. Hi,
    Could you please interpret the change in these results. These are for a two year old child we are looking to adopt.
    At 4 months of age:
    HBsAg Neg .095
    HBeAb Pos .390
    HBsAb Neg .639
    HBcAb Pos .802
    HBeAg Neg .034
    HBV DNA <500
    HBV vaccine at 2 months of age and again at 3 months of age
    Current test at 2 years of age:
    HBsAg Neg .181
    HBsAb Neg .680
    HBeAg Neg .102
    HBeAb Neg 3.833
    HBcAb Neg 4.389
    ALT 13.7
    AST 40.0
    AST/ALT 2.92
    Thank you!!

    1. Hello: It appears the child was infected with hepatitis B but now has an “inactive” infection. At this time he/she is testing negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), has a very low viral load and has no signs of liver damage (his/her ALT levels are normal). It’s confusing that the child is testing negative for both the hepatitis B “e” antigen and antibody, but clearly the child has more “e” antibodies (HBeAb) than “e” antigen, which is a good thing. Again, it appears the child is healthy in terms of hepatitis B and shows no signs of liver damage. Good luck!!!

  199. Having below result for hbv

    Hbsag negative
    Hbasb 4 miu/ml
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab positive
    LFT normal
    Question is in such condition, can infect to others? If yes. My wife is not vaccinated and I am living with her for 6 year. My Doctor told me that I cant spread virus. And she is negative for hbv checked her during pregnancy period. I am little confused because I had this infection in 2007 and after six months I got hbsag negative with low level of hbsab. But I did hbv pofile till 2015. So its very difficult to say, how much level of hbsab in between 2007 to 2015.
    Accordind to Dr advise I checked again in 2016. So got below result.
    Hbsag negative
    Hbsab 4mi/ml
    LFT normal

    I asking to my Dr that infection is elevated. Dr said to me, Its very difficult to say about infection that you have not documented hbsab more than six month. Is My Dr right?. He also brief that in my present situation several condition appear.

    1. You have a true inactive carrier and no need to any treatment.
    2. You had clear infection. Because you dont checked hbsab 2007 to 2016. May be possible in between this periods hbab level more than 10 miu/ml at some point and as we know level of hbsab fluctuate. You did test of hbsab 2016 and got 4miu/ml, may hbsab reduce.
    Finally Dr told me that You are with your wife and she is negative. That mean you are free of hbv infection or risk of spreading is very very very low.

    So sir i want to know. Are you agreed with my Dr

    1. Hello: We agree with your doctor, you are lucky and have inactive hepatitis B and require no treatment. It may be likely that you will never generate hepatitis B antibodies, and will continue with inactive infection all your life with no signs of liver damage, especially if you avoid alcohol and cigarettes and eat healthy. As mentioned before, it is imperative that your wife and child are vaccinated against hepatitis to protect them. Good luck.

  200. Dear Sir, I am 32 years male recently I was check my hbv and results is below.

    HBeAb – Reactive (0.02)
    HBeAg – Non-reactive (0.331)
    HBsAg- Reactive(>250)
    HBV -(Quantitative) -Less than 20 IU/mL
    Log Value- —

    Alpha Feto Protein (AFP)-2.27

    ALT-24

    Please suggest is there any serious concerned?

    1. Hello: While you test positive or reactive for hepatitis B (HBsAg), the rest of your tests show you are healthy and appear to have inactive hepatitis B. Your ALT level is within the healthy range, which means you are not experiencing liver damage, and your viral load (HBV DNA) is undetectable. Keep up your healthy lifestyle and avoid cigarettes and alcohol! Good luck.

  201. If one was determined to be a hep b inactive carrier, it is not transmitted during this phase (to unvaccinated)? If this inactive carrier tested negative for all parts of the hep b panel with no liver damage and low viral load, could the HBsAb later become positive and then this person can’t transmit the virus to unvaccinated people? Is there any way that one infected at one point, become unable to pass the infection to an unvaccinated person? Also, is this virus passed from blood to blood or body fluid to blood?

    1. Hello: If someone tests positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and/or HBV DNA (detectable viral load), then they are capable of spreading the infection to others, if they are unvaccinated, through exposure to blood, semen and body fluids. If you eventually are undetectable for HBsAg and HBV DNA, but have not developed hepatitis B surface antibodies, it is more difficult to transmit the infection. For more information on “functional cures” for people who have cleared both HBsAg and HBV DNA, please read: http://hepbblog.org/2016/03/23/forget-surface-antibodies-if-you-have-both-undetectable-viral-load-and-hbsag-you-might-be-functionally-cured/
      Thank you.

  202. Hello Doc, I received my test result : HBcAB 3.1 mUI/ML
    Hep B Core Antibody (IgM) Negative
    HBsAG Positive
    HBeAg Negative, HBeAB Positive, HBV DNA 29 Ul/Ml, ALT AST ( In norms), Bil (in norms), INR 1.28 ( normal value 0.8-1.2), Total Iron 175 mcg/dL ( 50-170 normal value) Alpha 1,2 Gamma , Beta, Albumina ( in norms). I was recovered in hospital in 2010 bc of an encrease of liver enzyme AST, ALT and high fever, HBsAg results positive after three weeks being in hospital. I have done regulary ( every 6 mouth) test of liver enzyme and viral load that has result negative or very low level but I am still carrier of HBs Ag with low level of HBcAB. I have fear of living my future because I consider my self a sick person and prejudice of having HBsAg positive even I don’t have ever abuse with my health and have had only one partner that is HBsAG Negative. I was just ulucky being HBs Ag and I still don’t know where I get it as none of my family has it ( probably at the dentist or during a crash in my young age) I am now 29 years old and I do regulary chek up. Somtimes I have itching especially during night and I have also stomach pain but my GP told me that has nothing to do with my status of HBs AG and my liver ( my liver was injured and has some scar but it works properly ) . Could you plese kindly give me an opinion about my last result ? I have not being vacinated for hepatits A, do you this I have to take the shoots in order to be protect of Hep A? Is it possible to clear definetly Hep B from my body with treatment ? Thank You !

    1. Hello: Your test results show your viral load (HBV DNA) is quite low and you indicated your ALT is now normal. This shows your hepatitis B infection is “inactive” and should not be damaging your liver, which is very good news. You do not need treatment.
      Please do not consider yourself a “sick” person or let your hepatitis B define you. It is simply a part of you. Many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B, and you can too.
      Many people never know how they became infected, the important thing is your infection is not harming your liver. Continue to take care of your health, get monitored regularly, and eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes.
      You should definitely get immunized for hepatitis A, medical guidelines recommend this for everyone with hepatitis B or C.
      Good luck.

  203. Thank you. What about Hepatits D, should I get tested also ? Does it change my situation if I am coinfected as Hep D is an antigen of Hep B.

    1. Hello: If you live in a country or region where hepatitis D is prevalent, then talk to your doctor about getting tested for hepatitis D also. Thank you.

  204. Greetings hepbtalk: I would like to appreciate for your efforts to educate hep B affected community with informed discussion and analysis on their shared reports.

    I would also like to share mine and want your opinion on it.
    In late 2011, I was diagnosed with Hep B virus at my varsity’s HBV screening campaign. On detection the team there advised me to follow up with HBsAg and then HDV PCR, as in their view, active HBV carriers can also likely develop HDV.
    My HBsAg result was REACTIVE (with value 241.3) and HDV came out NEGATIVE.
    After that, I consulted with G.I physician also specializing in liver diseases for the treatment. He saw both recent reports and further advised me to follow up with SGPT (ALT), HBV DNA Quantitative and HBeAg tests.
    My test results were: SGPT: 46 IU/L; HBV DNA: 23138650 IU/ml; HBeAg: Reactive with patient index 1695.866.
    When I showed these reports to my specialist, he said I have an immune tolerance and doesn’t need treatment at this stage. But he recommended to repeat SGPT after 3 months and HBV DNA after 6 months and pay visit.
    Though I being reluctant to follow up tests on given time, repeated tests after 2 years, which came out with following results:
    HBV DNA: 881270067 IU/ml; SGPT: 104 IU/L.
    When I visited my physician this time, he, after evaluating results told me to go for FDA tenfovir oral treatment and informed me to make it an integral part of your life. I, being confused over the fear of tangling-up with anti retro-viral drug for rest of my life. I insisted my doc to wait for another six months to re-test HBV DNA and see the chances of my immune system overcoming the virus replication. He agreed.
    I again showed grave negligence and opted for self-checking my SGPT tests alone. The series of my SGPT tests with irregular intervals then were: 73 UI/L, 44 UI/L, and 70 UI/L consecutively and didn’t visited my physician. As of now in 2016, when I again felt to go for HBV DNA and ALT tests, they were:
    HBV DNA: > 1000,000,000 UI/ml and ALT: 70 IU/L.
    I was shocked to see my HBV viral load which is at peak and ALT also increasing. I am going to specialist in few days, as my appointment is entertained. I’m 27 now.

    I WOULD LIKE YOU TO EXAMINE MY SITUATION ON GIVEN MEDICAL REPORT RANGES AND TELL ME WHERE I’M ACTUALLY STANDING. THANK YOU.

    1. Hello: I am glad you are seeing a specialist. Your viral load is high, which is common on someone who was probably infected at birth and is in the immune-tolerant stage. This means your immune system has not “woken up” or noticed the infection, because the virus has been there since birth. However, your ALT level at 70 is starting to show some liver damage. When liver cells are damaged, they release ALT into the blood. Normal ALT is 30 and less for men and 19 and less for women. Your ALT level is moderately elevated. Also, each lab has its “healthy” range, which can go up to 50. It may be that your immune system is now “waking up” and starting to attack the infected liver cells.
      Because of your high viral load and moderate liver damage, you really need to talk to your doctor about whether treatment is recommended at this time. You may decide to wait, but you should be monitored regularly and share the results with your doctor so together you can decide what next steps to take. Good luck.

  205. I was recently diagnosed with HBV, and my blood tests/positive HBsAg outcomes are indicating that it’s chronic. One of my BIG QUESTIONS is how the heck I got this! I’ve never had a blood transfusion, neither one of my two partners are positive for it, nor have I had any direct exposure to the virus, EXCEPT when I received the vaccine at work (I work in healthcare). I don’t know what to make of this.
    Moreso, I was told that my HBV was not actively replicating, per some tests for the DNA and all that, but my most recent test showed that I’m:
    HBeAg – NON – REACTIVE
    HBeAb- REACTIVE
    My DNA had increased from 100 to 1420 IU/mL and/or from 2.0 to 3.15 Log IU/mL
    HBsAg remains REACTIVE
    HB CORE AB is also REACTIVE
    After readinga bout these results, I’m confused as to what to make of the HBeAb and HBeAg result, particularly the HBeAg negative result, because it could indicate one of two things (from what I’m understanding)
    1. that it’s an extension/mutation, and the prognosis for treatment with this is poor, because of resistance to treatment, and may mean that my treatment, if ever needed, would be for a lifetime, and very sort of unknown/unpredictable
    2. that it’s a “good thing,” and that I’m not infectious, the DNA is not replicating, and as long as DNA remains at a lower level, that it will mean that I’m fine and that it remains in a “mild” stage.

    Plaese someone explain what this means, as I’m very anxious, just as I had come to grips with all this, I asked for the HBeAg test, because I was exploring clinical trials, so now I’m more confused. Getting a hold of the doctors is sometimes so difficult.

    I also would love to know if any of you can actually pinpoint to how you got it in the first place? I’ve never used any drugs, two partners my entire life (who are in the clear), no blood transfusions, or anything related to the sort.. again my only direct exposure that I know of was the vaccine, which all entities claim cannot cause this thing. I’ve tried to call the vaccine company, and am still waiting to hear back.. Help, and thank you… We NEED this CURE!!!

    1. Hello: People who work in healthcare are at higher risk of hepatitis B because of their exposure to blood and body fluids, which is why all should be vaccinated against hepatitis B. The hepatitis B virus is a very resilient virus, far more than HIV or hepatitis C. It can live for several days in dried blood. Many people will never know how they became infected. This infection rarely causes side effects and about 65% of people with chronic hepatitis B don’t know they’re infected. Many people became infected from their mothers (who also did not know they were infected) during delivery. Until introduction of the hepatitis B vaccine, about 5% of people in the U.S. had been infected.
      As you know, testing positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) indicates a current infection. Losing the hepatitis B “e” antigen and developing the “e” antibody is a good thing, as it means your immune system is fighting the infection by producing antibodies. It usually means your viral load is low, which it is, even at 1,420 IU/mL.
      What you did not include are your liver enzyme test results. When liver cells are damaged, they release the enzyme ALT (also called SGPT) into the blood. Normal ALT levels for women are 19 and under, and for men they are 30 and under. Now to answer your questions:
      1. It is not clear that you have HBeAg-negative hepatitis B, which includes the mutation you mentioned. Generally, doctors recommend treatment to HBeAg-negative patients when their viral load exceeds 2,000 IU/ML and their ALT liver enzyme levels are even moderately elevated. Until you know your ALT levels, it’s not clear you need treatment.
      2. It is good that your viral load is low. The higher the viral load, the higher the risk of liver damage.
      I know you’re probably reeling from this diagnosis, but please don’t focus too much on how you got it. What’s important is to focus on your health (eat healthy food, don’t smoke or drink alcohol) and get monitored regularly.
      Also, a chronic hepatitis B infection is defined as one that lasts longer than six to roughly 10 months. You will not know for sure if your infection is short-term or acute or chronic until you’ve been tested over that period as it can take several months to clear the infection.
      One last response, the hepatitis B vaccine contains only one protein or antigen from the virus. It is impossible to become infected from the vaccine. Good luck.

  206. Hello hepbtalk. Thank you so much for the feedback. I’m here again.

    Just to add few more things following my case:
    1. If it seems to you that I was probably infected by birth, then how I was administered hep b vaccine back in 2003-04 when I was in high school. they were followed by the tests from reputable diagnostic lab in my country. I got 2 immunization shots as per schedule. I don’t know how I developed chronic hep b infection.
    2. I didn’t had any blood transfusion; I do my facial shave in hygienic conditions at home; when I go to barber shop for hair cut, they use new disposable razor every time; I don’t have any infected intimate partner and neither I had any sexual encounter throughout my life. I really am confused about this.
    3. the healthy range of ALT or SGPT test in my lab reports is <45 for men and <35 for women.

    What is your analysis on this information?
    Again, Thank you so much for coming back and answering me.

    Best Regards,
    Majeed

    1. Hello: If you were infected at birth, then the childhood immunization would not make the infection go away. I don’t know why earlier tests did not pick up the infection.
      While medical guidelines state that an ALT level of 30 or less is healthy for men, every individual lab has its own “healthy” range that in your case goes up to 45 for men. There are sometimes variations between labs based on the equipment they use. We recommend that you use the same lab so you have true apples-to-apples comparison.
      Good luck.

  207. Dear Sir

    I was infected by chronic HBV ,within 3 month my ALT is change please suggest is there any serious concerned? Is there any reason to change ALT it will come down again in future?
    I have done USG in which Dr found 18mm gallstones,liver is normal ,is there any treatment on gallstones? Also I am feeling very weakness.

    HBeAb – Reactive (0.02)
    HBeAg – Non-reactive (0.331)
    HBsAg- Reactive(>250)
    HBV -(Quantitative) -Less than 20 IU/mL
    Log Value- —

    Alpha Feto Protein (AFP)-2.27

    ALT-24 on 2nd jan 2016
    AST-22 on 2nd Jan 2016

    After 3 months

    SGOT (AST) 26 IU/L on 10 Apr 2016
    SGPT (ALT) 30 IU/L -on 10 Apr 2016

    Regards,
    Mahesh

    1. Hello: ALT levels can vary, especially if you’re suffering from any kind of medical condition, including gallstones. Gallstones can also cause abdominal pain. Talk to your doctor about appropriate treatment for your gallstones, you may find that your ALT levels decrease after the gallstone problem is resolved. In the meantime, remember to eat healthy food and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  208. Dear Sir,
    I was diagnosed hepa positive during childhood. It’s already more than 20 yrs ago. Now, i decided to run a test again because i’ve read that there are cases that patient can be a lifetime carrier. And i’m worried that i may be able to pass it on to my offspring. Here’s my result:

    HbeAg: Non reactive (2.23)
    Hbc IGG: Non reactive (77.82)
    Hbc IGM: Non reactive (0.15)

    Thank you!
    Diane

    1. Hello: The important lab test, which indicates if you are currently infected with hepatitis B, is the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), which you did not include. Check your lab report again and look for HBsAg and see if you test positive or “reactive” for HBsAg.
      The other test to look for is the hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb). If you were infected and have resolved or cleared the infection, you will test reactive or positive for the hepatitis B surface antibody. If you are still infected with a long-term or chronic infection, you will test positive for HBsAg. Good luck.

  209. Dear Sir,
    In my family my uncle, aunty everyone is hbv positive.
    My uncle 49 years old did there hbv test in last week, following is reult

    HBsAg- Reactive(>250)
    HBV -(Quantitative) 11371 75 IU/mL
    Log Value-6.05

    Alpha Feto Protein (AFP)-3.27

    ALT 40

    Please suggest is there any serious concerned?

    Regards,
    Mahesh.

    1. Hello: Did he also get a hepatitis B “e” antigen or antibody test? (HBeAg or HBeAb). Over time, we can develop a hepatitis B mutation that allows the virus to reproduce without secreting the “e” antigen. When we are HBeAg-negative (and positive for the “e” antibody) and have a viral load of 2,000 IU/mL or higher (which your uncle does) with elevated ALT levels, which indicates liver damage, that means we have HBeAg-negative hepatitis B and may require treatment.
      Your uncle’s ALT level is 40, which is slightly high, depending how his lab defines normal ALT. Usually, healthy ALT levels are 30 or less for men. He should be monitored regularly so your doctor can prescribe treatment if his ALT levels increases. He and his doctor can review World Health Organization guidelines for treating hepatitis B at http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/
      Also, he should avoid alcohol and smoking and eat healthy food.
      Good luck.

  210. Hi,
    I am chronic Hep B for 11 years and last time I tested my LFT’s are normal, HbsAG reactive, HbeAg -ve, HbeAB +ve, HBV DNA not detected in 2006. I have be occasional drinker and smoker and always were in limits. I have quit smoking and drinking about 4 years ago. now I am 32 and I am scared to death, I might have damaged my liver . I was completely normal except that I have pollen Allergy for last 4 years.
    Can you tell me what percent of my liver might have damaged and my life expectancy?

    1. Hello: Our livers are very resilient, especially when we’re young. So your youthful indiscretions with drinking and smoking hopefully have not caused any lasting damage. Even people who developed cirrhosis after years of hepatitis infection (and drinking) have cleared their livers of cirrhosis once they stopped drinking and were treated. Livers do regenerate over time. Keep eating healthy foods, continue to avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and get yourself monitored regularly. Good luck.

    2. Dear Sir,

      Yesterday my uncle visit to hospital,the liver specialist suggest that my uncle need to take medicine for 6 month. After that again need to check HBV DNA. Also they did fibroscan having score 6.7kpa.

      My question is what the fibroscan score indicates? My uncle HBV DNA will decrease.? Is there any serious concerned in future. Please suggest.

      Regards,
      Mahesh.

      1. Hello: Fibroscan results range from 2.5 kPa to 75 kPa. Between 90–95% of healthy people without liver disease will have a liver scarring measurement less then 7.0 kPa (median is 5.3 kPa). So it appears your uncle’s liver may be in good shape. Many factors impact whether to treat someone for hepatitis B, including age, gender, the number of years they’ve been infected with hepatitis B, viral load and signs of liver damage (usually measured by a blood test for ALT or SGPT). A Fibroscan reading is just one piece of the evaluation. Good luck.

  211. Hi sir am 26yrs old and my result shows this
    HBsAg+
    HBsAb-
    HBeAg-
    HBeAb+
    HBcAb+
    What do I do about my current status 5months ago

    1. Hello: If you have had these same results for five months, it may mean that you have a chronic hepatitis B infection, however you will need to be tested again to confirm that. When healthy adults are infected with hepatitis B, our immune systems can take six to eight months to get rid of the virus. However, when we infected as newborns or young children, our immature immune systems don’t recognize the virus and it infects our liver and becomes long-term or chronic. Please get tested again in two to three months to see if you continue to test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), which would indicate a chronic infection. Also, you should have a blood test for the liver enzyme ALT or SGPT to see if you’re experiencing any liver damage from hepatitis B. When our liver cells are injured by infection, they release ALT/SGPT into the blood. Normal or healthy ALT/SGPT levels are under 30 for men and 19 for women. Good luck.

  212. Hi im 30 y.o and i believe i got this infection since i was a child i dont where i can get this.me and my mother had this virus but my two younger sister was not infected though.recently i was chech my blood test and my doctor said i was still had this virus.can u pls explain all my results.
    hbsag-1608.31 reactive
    Hbeag -0.018 non reactive
    Sgpt level is normal -12

    1. Hello: It is not unusual for one child to become infected with hepatitis B from an infected mother while other brothers or sisters do not. It could be that while your mother was pregnant with you that her viral load (HBV DNA) was higher than when she gave birth to your siblings. Or, perhaps your sister was vaccinated shortly after birth.
      The good news is you are negative or nonreactive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg), which means you probably do not have much hepatitis B virus in your body. Also, your SGPT liver enzyme result shows no signs of liver damage, which is excellent.
      Continue to be monitored regularly, eat healthy food, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and make sure you practice safe sex and your partner is vaccinated. Good luck.

  213. Do u think i have chronic hep b since i have this when im still a child?and i have a partner now but we dont practice safe sex.but i am.sure that he has a vaccine from hep b.u think.i can.pass the virus from him?

    1. Hello: Hepatitis B is spread through exposure to blood and body fluids, and the infection is transmitted most commonly by (unsafe) sex and from mother-to-child during childbirth. Never assume someone has been vaccinated. The CDC recommends that all housemates and sexual partners of someone with hepatitis B get vaccinated AND get tested about one month after the third vaccine dose to make sure their immune system has produced enough antibodies to protect them against infection.
      Most people with chronic infections were infected as children, most commonly they were infected at birth by exposure to their hepatitis B-infected mother’s blood and body fluids.
      Please have your partner tested for hepatitis B and vaccinated, if they need it. Good luck.

  214. Hello sir my HBsAg is reactive and HBeAg is non reactive and my LFT is normal ..what does it mean ?

    1. Hello: A reactive or positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) test result shows you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Testing nonreactive for HBeAg is good, because it suggests that your viral load is low. Also, a normal liver function test (LFT) shows you are not experiencing any liver damage from hepatitis B. Keep up the good work, eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and make sure to practice safe sex (use a condom). Good luck.

  215. o sir …my age is 27 and my HBsAg is 10.84 (reactive)and HBeAg is 0.409 (non-reactive)
    LFT report :
    BILIRUBIN (TOTAL): 0.5 mg/dl
    BILIRUBIN (CONJUGATED): 0.2mg/dl
    BILIRUBIN (UNCONJUGATED):0.3
    TOTAL PROTIEN:6.7 g/dl
    ALBUMIN: 4.7 g/dl
    GLOBULIN: 2.0 g/dl
    A/G Ratio: 2.4 xxx
    SGOT (AST): 21 u/l
    SGPT (ALT): 22 u/l
    Alkaline Phosphatase: 118
    NATURE OF SPECIMEN : SERUM .

    Sir I am very worried about my infection ..I am very healthy adult , will I recover from this diseases ..
    THANKS .

    1. Hello: Your liver enzyme (ALT/SGPT) test result of 22 u/l shows you are not currently experiencing liver damage, which is excellent. Also, because you test negative or non-reactive for the hepatitis B “E” antigen (HBeAg) test, it suggests that your viral load is probably low. Keep up the good work, eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and make sure to practice safe sex (use a condom).
      Currently, there is no cure for hepatitis B, however experts predict they should have a cure in the next few years. Good luck.

  216. Once infected with hbv and becomes inactive hbv carrier is there a chance of natural eradication bevomes hbsag negative

    1. Hello: Yes you can clear the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). As your immune system attacks the infected liver cells and generates antibodies to suppress the virus, you can experience a reduction and loss of HBsAg. Good luck.

    1. Hello: Please talk to your doctor about this, I am unaware of it being linked to hepatitis B. Good luck.

  217. Sir thank you for your reply ..I would like to ask u one more thing ..by looking at my report and HBEAG report …can u tell me that ..can I recover from this diseases . Now I am having boiled food and lots of fruits ..

    1. Hello: I cannot tell if you will eventually clear hepatitis B from your lab report. All you can do is eat healthy food and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

      1. So how can I clear my infection. .I think I was infected in adult ..cause I did not had in my childhood .

        1. Hello: There is no cure for hepatitis B. If you think you were recently infected, wait several months and get retested, that will show whether you have a short-term (acute) or long-term (chronic) infection. When newborns or children are infected, their immature immune systems don’t recognize or fight the infection and it becomes chronic. When we’re infected as adults, our immune systems are usually able to clear the infection in about six to eight months. Good luck.

  218. I go hospital for check up yesterday still postive for hbsag and alt and everything mormal the doctor say come back after 6 month time but my left upper part is burning and it has also penterat filling and.i have also pain in right leg please help me i donot know what to do the doc say i am ok but i know i am not ok and also please help me i loose too weight and everyone i know ask me why you slim i want to be normal weight what should i do please help me?

    1. Hello: Those symptoms are usually not associated with a hepatitis B infection, and they be caused by other medical conditions. Please contact your doctor and review your symptoms with your healthcare provider. Good luck.

  219. I have queations i want you to clearly answer me
    1)hbeag stay postive for how long?
    2)naturally from.hbeag postive to negative how long it takes?
    3)hbeab to appear how long does it need naturally?
    Please brifely explain to me it hrlps me a lot grom where i got hbv

    1. Hello:

      uigfdfgdg@yahoo.com
      60.182.147.98

      Hello: Here are my answers.
      1)HBeAg stay postive for how long? It is impossible to say. If we were infected as newborns or children, HBeAg can remain until we are in our teens, twenties, and thirties or even longer, until our immune system is able to generate enough “e” antibodies to eradicate the “e” antigen.
      2)naturally from.hbeag postive to negative how long it takes? See the above answer, I do not know.
      3)hbeab to appear how long does it need naturally? If we’re infected as children, the “e” antibody can appear in our 20s, 30s or even longer.
      Good luck.

  220. Mr name is kwaku,and have been diagnosed of hepatitis B this ‘what the the doctor said about me during my lab in 2014 hepatitis B DNA count is 64 000iu/ml.LFT’s are normal.serum Alpha feto protein is 1.and was diagnosed again in 11/01/2016 hepatitis B carrier”e”antigen positive,Normal ultrasound and LET’s.viral load pending,please l dont understand can you explain to me about this thanks

    1. Hello: You may be in the immune-tolerant stage of hepatitis B. During this stage, your immune system does not recognize the hepatitis B virus infection and “tolerates” the virus. As a result, you may have a high viral load and no signs of liver damage. When the immune system finally notices the infection, it generates antibodies and it attacks the infected liver cells. During this “active” phase, your viral load will decrease but your liver enzymes (ALT or SGPT) may increase because the infected liver cells are being destroyed by the immune system. Also, you eventually will lose the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) and develop “e” antibodies (HBeAb). Continue to be monitored regularly, and eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  221. I have queations i want you to clearly answer m
    “this are for ADULTS” for adults
    1)hbeag stay postive for how long?
    2)naturally from.hbeag postive to negative how long it takes?
    3)hbeab to appear how long does it need naturally?
    Please brifely explain to me it hrlps me a lot grom where i got hbv

  222. Hi how are you i am from china last year i have healthy full check up and everything was normal before 10 months,
    My hep b result was from results
    Hbsag negative
    Hbeag negative
    Hbeab negative
    Hbcab negative
    every 1 year i do a full check up i am 29 male and good status ,this week i feel uncomfortable around my stomach and describe the doctor what i fill and he cheeks me all body parts and i was devastated he talked me that i have hep b,non of my family have it.my result is
    hbsag positive
    hbeag negative
    hbcab positive
    hbeab positive
    hbv DNA 756
    Fibroscan normal
    Hbsag quantity 21546iuml
    From where or how i got this virus is i do not know sexually i was not active only i go dental two times i member this transfer or not?
    I am clearing the virus? or i am becoming chronic i have read on one website that hbeab positive is chronic is it real?
    I do the hbcab igm test and it is negative this means chronic?
    I am adult and strong why not I clear the virus develop hbsab?
    is there any cure that make me free?
    what is the average life expectancy for chronic hbv?
    I want to full understand the virus and my chances I need help badly
    (is this possible that I read on medhelp hbsag can be transmitted by saliva, if some infected purposely put blood on food because blood stay for one week, dental clinic…. is this real and why only e antibody develop not the s antibody) can I take hbiglobin it helps me may be it is one or two days since infected ?????????

    1. Hello: If you previously have tested negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and now you test positive, it means you were recently infected. When healthy adults are infected, it can take around six months for your immune system to clear out the infection. This short-term infection is called an acute infection. The vast majority of healthy adults who become infected do get rid of hepatitis B. However, you will have to be patient. In six months, return to your doctor and get tested again. Hopefully by then you will have gotten rid of HBsAg and will test positive for the hepatitis B surface antibody, which means you have cleared the infection.
      Everyone, including those who have chronic or acute hepatitis B, who becomes infected develops the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg), it doe3s not mean you are chronically infected. Saliva does not transmit the virus.
      I know this is a difficult time, but stay positive, eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes.
      HBIG will not help you get rid of the infection.
      Good luck.

  223. hepatitis b viral (hbv dna ) quantitative real time pcr @ real time pcr – taqman tec. is 848. AND hepatitis Be ANTIBODY ( Anti-HBe), serum @ (CMIA ) IS 0.01. SIR PLEASE HELP ME , WHAT TO DO ?

    1. Hello: Your viral load (HBV DNA) test shows how much virus you have in your body, and the level at 848 Iu/mL is quite low. Also, you appear to be testing positive or reactive for the hepatitis B “e” antibody (HBeAg), which shows your immune system is trying to fight the virus by producing antibodies, such as this “e” antibody to try to clear the infection. Have you been tested for liver damage? This is an blood test that measures liver enzymes (ALT or SGPT) in your blood. Liver cells release ALT/SGPT when they are injuries. Healthy ALT/SGPT levels are 30 or less for men and 19 or less for women.
      You generally do not require treatment unless you have both a high viral load and signs of liver damage. The best thing to do is eat healthy foods, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

    1. Hello: Developing the hepatitis B “e” antibody (HBeAb) is good news, it often means that your immune system is actively fighting the infection and your the amount of virus in your body (viral load – HBV DNA) is going to decline.
      Keep getting monitored, get tested for liver damage (ALT/SGPT tests), eat healthy food, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  224. Post blood donation, I go the screening report which says Anti bodies HCV non reactive, HB Sag non reactive and Anti HBC reactive. let me know if any follow up is needed on the said screening.

    1. Hi: It means you do not have hepatitis C (HCV), and you are not currently infected with hepatitis B, otherwise you would test positive or reactive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). However, in the past you have been infected with hepatitis B, which is why you tested positive for the hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb). The good news is you cleared the infection, and require no follow-up. Thank you.

      1. Thank you very much for a good news.
        Is there a chance of infecting in future do you recommend me to have a vaccine to prevent from infecting in future ?
        Is there any way that I continue to donate blood.

        1. Hello: Once we have been infected, unfortunately we cannot donate blood. A vaccine will not do anything once you have been infected. If you have cleared the virus and developed hepatitis B surface antibodies (HBsAb), you are not at risk of infecting anyone. However, if you still test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you can spread the virus and need to practice safe sex and avoid sharing razors, toothbrushes and personal jewelry. Good luck.

  225. Pls help

    HBsAg 1.00 – cut off value
    Patient’s cnt- 5,257 – reactive

    Anti – HBc IgM 1.00 – cut off value
    Patient’s cnt – 0.06 – nonreactive

    What is the meaning of this? Does it necesarily mean that if you are hbsag positive and hbc igm negative you have ichronic hepa B?

    Pls help thnks

    1. Hello: If you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. If you test positive or reactive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it means you have a long-term or chronic hepatitis B infection. The anti-HBc refers to the hepatitis B core antibody, which appears following infection. You may want to get another test to find out if you have any liver damage from the infection (a blood test for ALT or SGPT), and you need to be tested in six months to find out if your infection is chronic or acute. Good luck.

  226. Hello sir
    My cousin was diagnosed four years ago
    Her current result shows
    HBsAg +
    HBsAb –
    HBeAg –
    HBeAb +
    HBcAb(lgM+lgG)
    Total protein 78.2
    Albumen 44.7
    Sgot(AST) 11.9
    Sgpt(ALT) 20.4
    GGT 30.1
    Total bil 14.6
    Direct bil 13.1
    ALK PHOSP 174.9
    Please i want to know if it is contagious and if there is a need for her to be on medication

    1. Hello: Her test results are good. While you don’t have a viral load (HBV DNA) report, hopefully her viral load is low because she has tested positive (reactive) for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg). Also, her liver enzyme test (SGPT/ALT) is normal at 20.4, which indicates no liver damage. Only her doctor can tell if she needs treatment, but generally medical guidelines do not call for treatment if viral load is low and there are no signs of liver damage.
      Because she tests positive for HBsAg, her blood and body fluids are contagious. In general, everyone should be vaccinated against hepatitis B. Remember, about 65 percent of people with hepatitis B do not know they are infected! Good luck.

      1. With good life style can she get back to the stage where her blood n body fluids will no longer b contagious?and can she get back to a stage where the virus will not b detected?

  227. I have chronic hepa b but ny liver is in normal siz. Is it possible if i take medicine to prevent liver cancer ?

    1. Hello: Hepatitis B is not a fatal disease, and many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B. It is important that you are monitored regularly to make sure the virus is not harming your liver. Be sure your liver enzymes (ALT or SGPT) are tested, this test will show if there is any liver damage occurring. Doctors usually do not prescribe treatment unless there are lots of virus in your body (high viral load or HBV DNA) and you have signs of liver damage. Eat healthy food, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and be sure to practice safe sex (use a condom) as direct contact with infected blood and body fluids can spread the virus. Good luck.

  228. Hi doc, ive been diagnose with chronic hepatitis B. I have high ALT 70. But my liver ultrasound is in normal lize. My doctor told me that I have fatty liver. Can this cause cancer? Or not if I get treated? I will also have my test tomorrow for HBV DNA quantitative results.

    1. Hello: The combination of fatty liver and hepatitis B can accelerate liver damage. Your ALT is moderately high. Normal or healthy ALT levels are up to 30 for men and 19 for women.
      Your doctor will consider your viral load (HBV DNA), ALT, age, and gender among other things when deciding whether to recommend treatment or whether to continue to monitor you carefully in the months ahead.
      Remember, eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  229. Hi! Thank you for your reply.

    Here’s my result
    anti HBE – reactive
    Hbeag – non reactive

    What does it mean? Thanks. Im 54 y.o.

    1. Hello: Testing negative (or non-reactive) for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) and positive or reactive for the “e” antibody (anti HBe)generally means your immune system is fighting the infection, and your “e” antibodies have eradicated the “e” antigens.
      You should also get an ALT or SGPT blood test. ALT/SGPT is a liver enzyme that our liver cells release when they are damaged. “Normal” or healthy ALT levels are up to 30 for men and 19 for women. This test is important because it shows whether the virus is harming your liver.
      You may want to get a viral load (HBV DNA) test to find out how much virus is in your body. Remember, eat healthy foods, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  230. Hello, My hb test results is as follows
    hbsag +
    hbsab –
    hbeag –
    hbeab –
    hbcab +
    alt 63
    ast 56
    please what is my status . Advice me.

    1. Hello: As you probably know, your positive hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) test indicates you have hepatitis B. The fact you test negative for both the hepatitis B “e” antigen and antibody means they are both at low levels. The antibody and antigen are basically at a state of war with each other, with the antibody working to subdue or eradicate the antigen.
      The ALT is a liver enzyme that our liver cells release when they are damaged. “Normal” or healthy ALT levels are up to 30 for men and 19 for women. This means your ALT levels of 56 are a bit above normal, indicating some liver damage. Every lab has different technology, so your lab’s “normal” range for ALT may be up to 50, so you need to review the lab result carefully and see if it flags your ALT as above normal.
      You may want to get a viral load (HBV DNA) test to find out how much virus is in your body. Otherwise, keep getting monitored regularly and if your ALT levels continue to be high or increase, you should consult with your doctor to see if you need treatment based on your age and other health conditions. Remember, eat healthy foods, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  231. Hi Dr. Singh,
    This is really in informative,
    I would like to know few things with my reading here

    Anti HCV Antibody-Non Reactive
    HBeAg (Hepatitis B e Antigen)-0.455 —>Non Reactive: 1.0
    –>Reactive: > 1.0
    Anti HBeAg Antibody-0.01—>Positive: = 0.5
    —>Negative: >= 0.5

    Can you please let me know,the result with these readings?

    1. Hello: The “Anti HCV Antibody-Non Reactive” means you have tested negative for hepatitis C, which is always good news.
      The other reports on your hepatitis B “e” antigen and antibody is confusing for me.
      Have you had a liver enzyme (ALT or SGPT) test? This test is important and indicates if you are experiencing any liver damage from the infection. Please check your results and consult with your doctor if you have not had this test. The World Health Organization has published monitoring and treatment guidelines for hepatitis B at http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/ You may want to review these with your doctor.
      Good luck.

  232. Can you please help me with my result. Thanks!

    Anti – hbe = postive
    Hbeag = negative

    HBV viral load
    5,279 IU/ml
    30,724 per copies/ml

    Thanks so much for this

      1. Hello: Your ALT liver enzyme level is above normal, indicating some liver damage is occurring. When liver cells are damaged, they release the enzyme ALT into the bloodstream. Healthy ALT levels for women are 19 and under. You may want to review your results with your doctor, and see if you can get a viral load (HBV DNA) test to see how much virus you have in your body. As you age, the hepatitis B virus can mutate and cause liver damage, even if you no longer test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg). Generally, doctors recommend treatment if you are HBeAg-negative, and have a viral load exceeding 2,000 IU/mL and elevated ALT levels. Also, if you have any history of liver cancer in your family, it is important to be monitored regularly and treated with either entecavir or tenofovir (Viread) if you are experiencing liver damage as you get older. Good luck.

        1. Yes my hbv viral load is beyond 2000.
          HBV viral load
          5,279 IU/ml
          30,724 per copies/ml

          My doctor said I have fatty liver, maybe it’s the reason of my moderately high ALT (70) but that was 2 weeks ago. Maybe I should take test again now for ALT/SGPT right? To know if the medicine she prescribed me for my fatty liver is working, besides Im eating avocados 3 times a week.

          Since Im negative in Hbeag and has a viral load of above 2,000. Am I going to take the medicine lifetime?

          1. Hello: As you may know, the combination of fatty liver and hepatitis B can accelerate liver damage. According to medical guidelines, you’re on the borderline for treatment. You and your doctor should discuss whether this is a good time to start treatment, or if you want to continue to monitor your condition, especially if you are able to lose weight and reduce the fatty liver risk. Your doctor will consider your overall health, age, and any family history of liver cancer when recommending treatment.
            We are not aware of any health benefits relating to hepatitis B from eating avocados. Doctor generally recommend a healthy diet, and avoidance of alcohol and cigarettes.
            Good luck.

  233. Hello, my result is as follows
    hbsag +
    hbsab –
    hbcab +
    hbeag –
    hbeab –
    alt 63
    ast 54
    please advice me…. and what is my status ?

    1. Hello: Your liver enzymes (called ALT or SGPT) are slightly elevated. Healthy ALT levels are 30 or less for men and 19 and less for women. I encourage you to review your condition, and viral load (HBV DNA) if you have that result with your doctor. Your doctor will consider your overall health, age, and gender when discussing whether treatment is needed. If you live outside of the U.S., the World Health Organization has published treatment guidelines for hepatitis B at http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/
      You may want to review them with your doctor, who will be familiar with your situation and determine if it is hepatitis B that is causing the liver damage. In the meantime, eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes.
      Good luck.

  234. HBsAg – Positive
    HCV – Heapatitis C Virus – NonReactive
    HBe (e Antigen): (MEIA) = Positive
    Anti – HBe (e Antibody): (MEIA) = Positive
    Comments* Early Phase of Sero Conversion

    Bilirubin Total Serum (1.3) mg/dl
    Bilrubin Conjugated (0.6) mg/dl
    Bilirubin Unconjugated (0.7) Mg/dl

    Protein total 7.9 g/dl
    Albumin – Serum – 3.8

    Globulin Serum 4.1 g/dl
    Albumin:Globulin Serum Ratio – 0.9 g/dl

    *ALT (SGPT) – 765 U/L
    *AST (SGOT) – 345
    *GGTP – 95 U/l
    Alkaline Phosphatase 105 U/l
    AG Ratio Albumin : Globulin – Serum – 0.9 g/dl

    Prothrombin PT – 14.5 sec
    Mean Normal Prothrombin tim (MNPT) – 13.0 sec
    INR -1.1.3

    1. Hello: Your ALT (SGPT) is very high, which indicates that your are experiencing liver damage from hepatitis B or some other medical condition. When liver cells are damaged, they release the enzyme ALT (also called SGPT) into the bloodstream. Healthy ALT levels for men are 30 or less, and for women it is 19 or less. Your ALT level of 765 indicates you are experiencing liver damage from hepatitis B or some other cause, perhaps from alcohol, a toxin or fatty liver disease. You must consult with your doctor and get monitored regularly. If liver damage continues, your doctor may recommend treatment with an antiviral, either entecavir or tenofovir (Viread). If you live outside of the United States, the World Health Organization has published treatment guidelines for hepatitis B at http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/
      You may want to review them with your doctor, who will be familiar with your situation and determine if it is hepatitis B that is causing the liver damage.
      Good luck.

  235. My results are as follows:
    HBsAG – Negative
    HBs Ab – 13.1 mIU/ml
    HEP B core Antibody – Positive

    do i need to do more tests?

    1. Hello: You do not need additional tests. Your results show that at some point you were infected with hepatitis B, but your immune system was able to fight off the infection. You cannot be infected again as you now have hepatitis B antibodies to protect you. Good luck.

      1. That i very good news.

        Just to be sure, are you sure that my results means i am clean?
        dont i have a chance of developing Chronic Hepatitis B?
        i Gave my results to a doctor and recommended that i should take vaccine?

        1. Hello: If you test positive or reactive for the hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb), it means you are not infected with hepatitis B. These antibodies will protect you for life and you don’t have a chance of developing chronic hepatitis B. You do not need to be immunized as you already have antibody protection against the infection. Good luck.

  236. Here i have another test result with me, can someone please help me out

    HBV Qantitative (Viral Load) – Real Time PCR

    Method: HBV Quantitative by Real Time PCR
    Result: 1,43,69,880 IU/ml
    Interpretation: 1,43,69,880 IU/ml

    1. Hello: Your viral load is quite high. As mentioned in our other response, please consult with your doctor. Current medical guidelines recommend treatment with one of two antivirals, tenofovir or entecavir, which are pills you take daily. Antivirals make it difficult for the virus to reproduce and will reduce your viral load and hopefully your liver damage. Good luck.

  237. Hii sir my test
    HbsAg – reactive
    HbeAg – non reative (0.341)
    My liver function test is normal except in serum bilirubin =serum gamma gt is 9
    My stool chemical examination report
    Stool for occult blood – positive
    And esr is 28
    Is it really serious sir plz help me i am very tensed
    I am male of age 19 plzz advice me

    1. Hello: All I can comment on are your test results relating to hepatitis B and liver function. As you may know, if you test positive or reactive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Because you tested negative or nonreactive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg), it means your immune system is fighting the infection and the “e” antibodies have cleared out the “e” antigens, which is a good sign.
      Also, because your liver function is normal, it means your hepatitis B infection is not causing any liver damage at this time. So, continue to get monitored regularly, eat healthy food and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Please make sure your family members are tested for hepatitis B and vaccinated, if needed, and be sure to practice safe sex (use a condom) as direct contact with blood and body fluids, including semen, can spread hepatitis B. Good luck.

  238. Hi sir. Pls help me, my doctor made me choose between injection or tablet (entecavir).

    My doc told me that if i choose medication thru injection, this is finite for 1 year, and theres a 10% chance to be free from virus (completely cured). I just want to ask if its true? Finite? Does it mean that after that 1 year, I dont need to take vitamins and medicine anymore? And no chance of having a high viral load again, that the virus will never be active again?

    And if I choose tablet,she said that most likely I’ll take it for lifetime.

    Are the two options with regular checkup of liver, an assurance of not having a liver cancer/cirrhosis?

    Thanks sir. Youre such a blessing to us 🙂

    1. Hello: Your doctor is correct, the two available treatments for hepatitis B are daily antiviral pills, which reduce the amount of virus in your body but only for as long as you take them, and a weekly injection with pegylated interferon.
      Many people choose pills because they are easier to take and less costly than interferon. However, interferon has a small advantage of helping some people with the right hepatitis B viral strain or genotype, of getting rid of the infection.
      It’s not an easy decision, however if you have fatty liver, reducing your weight and increasing your exercise may help you reach a point where you do not require treatment indefinitely. Please discuss all of these options with your doctor. Good luck.

    1. Hello:
      I’m sorry I don’t know what ESR is. If you mean ALT or SGPT, a level of 28 is healthy. Healthy levels of the liver enzyme ALT or SGPT are 30 and less for men and 19 and less for women. Good luck.

  239. my brother is having below , pls advice what it means

    CMIA (Abbott arthitecture KIT)Reactive

    CMIA 1st Run : 4864.17
    CMIA 2nd Run 4969.17

    1. Hello: I’m sorry but I cannot tell much from this information. Was this a measurement for his viral load (PCR or HBV DNA?) Also, is there a lab report with his test results for different hepatitis B antigens and antibodies that you can share. And lastly, did the doctor test liver enzymes, called either ALT or SGPT, through a blood test? When liver cells are damaged, they release the enzyme ALT into the bloodstream. Healthy ALT levels are 30 and under for men and 19 and under for women. If you have this information, it would be helpful. Thank you.

  240. This is my cousin result.

    HBeAg – Non reactive(0.362)
    Anti HBe to HBeAg – Reactive(0.01)
    HbcAb-IgM Ab -Non Reactive(0.4)
    Anti HCV-Ab to Hepatitis C Virus -Negative

    HBsAg screening by ELISA – Positive (2.766)

    Kindly advice about the stage of HBV.

    Anish.

    1. Hello: It is impossible to tell what “stage” he is at from these lab tests. The good news is he has developed the “e” antibody (antiHBe), which usually means his viral load should be reduced. Has he had a viral load (HBV DNA) test, and a blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). Liver cells release ALT into the blood stream when they’re damaged by infection. A healthy ALT for men is 30 and under and for women it is 19 and under.
      Also, is this the first test where he/she has tested positive for hepatitis B (and the hepatitis B surface antigen – HBSAg)? If it’s the first time, have them tested again in six months to determine if this is a recent infection or one they have had since childhood. When healthy adults are infected, their immune systems usually get rid of the infection without any treatment within six months. I hope this is helpful, good luck.

    1. Hello: Congratulations, yes you are! To be protected against hepatitis B, you must have at least 10 mIU/mL of hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-HBs). Good luck.

  241. hi.im almost 7 months taking tenofover.after 7 months i checked again my hbv dna test.then ive got the result.from 7 milion dropped to 20 iu only.and sgpt is 28.hbeag negative and anti hbe is also negative.since 2000 i was carrier that virus.just last feb 2016 i took that anti viral.i dont like dringkingbof liquar and smoking.so please advise if this 20 iu is possible to dropped to zero iu.and can can inject the hepa b vaccine once become zero iu.and how about the tenofover is there any major side effect taking tenofover.and since ive got 20 iu result of hbv viral load within 7 months.can i continue taking this tenofover up to 1yr or i will stop.thanks doct

    1. Hello: Congratulations on your steep drop in viral load from 7 million to nearly undetectable at 20 Iu/mL, and your loss of the hepatitis B “e” antigen. You can take tenofovir indefinitely to keep your viral load down and to reduce your risk of liver damage. There is little difference between a viral load of 20 and zero. Hopefully your immune system is beginning to fight the infection and the antiviral will help by reducing the amount of virus. The only side effects from tenofovir are minor bone loss and some impact on kidney function, but only after years of treatment. Researchers have developed a new, lower-dose tenofovir formulation that carries a lower risk of bone loss and impact on kidney function. It is now before the U.S. FDA and may be available next month.
      Continue a healthy lifestyle, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes, which will help you fight the infection.
      Unfortunately, immunization has not been found to clear hepatitis B infection, even if your viral load is undetectable. The vaccine contains only the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) which you already have in your body.
      Good luck.

    1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. When someone is first infected with hepatitis B, it is considered an acute infection. Most healthy adults who are acutely infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg after 6 months, it is considered a chronic infection. Knowing whether your hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
      Good luck.

  242. hello
    I was tested for HBV morehan a year ago.I have done my test every three months. my Liver fuction test has always been normal.
    Below is my most recent result done on 14/10/16:
    HBsag Pos
    HBsab: Neg
    HBeag: Neg
    Hbeab: neg
    HBcab: neg
    can you please interpret my result?
    thanks

    1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Your other tests are a bit confusing, and may not be transcribed correctly. Have you had a blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). This test determines whether someone needs treatment or not they are experiencing liver damage. When liver cells are damaged, they release ALT into the blood stream. Healthy ALT levels are generally up to 30 in men and up to 19 in women. Good luck.

  243. Hello sir. I am Nigerian studying in Taiwan an i am given a test result as follow
    HBsAg:Positive 5449.00(0.900,Negative)
    HBsAb : Negative 2.00(<10.00,Negative)
    Anti HCV: Negative 0.04(0.900,Negative)

    Can you help me with the interpretation of this result?

    Thank you

    1. Hello: It appears you have tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). This indicates you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Is this the first time you have been tested for hepatitis B? To know if you were recently infected and have an acute or short-term infection or a long-term, chronic infection, you must get tested again for HBsAg in six months. It can take about six months for a healthy adult who was recently infected to clear hepatitis B. When newborns (born to infected women) or young children are infected, their immature immune systems don’t recognize and fight the infection and it can become chronic or long-term. In the meantime, your doctor may want to test your liver enzymes through a simple blood test to find out if the infection is causing any liver damage. During this time, it is important to avoid alcohol and cigarettes and practice safe sex, as infectious blood and body fluids can spread the infection.
      Your negative Anti HCV test means you have tested negative for the hepatitis C virus.
      Good luck.

  244. Dear sir/mdam,

    My name is Jay Jenkins and i am yrs of age ,I was diagnose Positive to Hepatitis B 3 years ago The Doctor told me my body will fight against it but sometimes i go feel the symptoms ( Fatigue and Stomach pains) . Just last week i went to check up and i was tested Positive again and Doctor ask me to do Hepatitis B profile and i decided to do Liver test in addition because ive started feeling slightly chest pains.Please i need your advice and the following are my LAB results from MDS- LANCET LABORATORIES :

    IMMUNOLOGY:

    HEP “B” CORE Ab (HBcAb) = POSITIVE
    HEP “B” CORE IgM (HBcIgM)= NEGATIVE
    HEP “B” SURFACE Ag Quant =13000 IU/ml

    HEP “B” SURFACE Ab (HBsAB)= NEGATIVE
    HEP “B” SURFACE VALUE = 0.00 mIU/mL
    HEP “B”e ANTIGEN (HBeAg) = NEGATIVE
    HEP “B”e ANTIBODY (HBeAb) = POSITIVE

    BIOCHEMISTRY

    LIVER FUNCTION TEST :

    S-BILIRUBIN (Total) = 21 umol/L
    S-BILIRUBIN conjugated = 4 umol/L
    ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE,ser = 59 IU/L
    s-g-GLUTAMYL TRANSFERASE = 28 IU/L
    S-ALT (GPT) = 40 IU/L
    S-AST (GOT) = 44 IU/L
    S-TOTAL PROTEIN = 71 g/L
    S-ALBUMIN = 48 g/L

    Please help .

    1. Hello: Keep in mind that not everyone with hepatitis B require treatment, many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B. Generally, medical guidelines recommend treatment if you are experiencing liver damage. This is indicated by an ultrasound and a simple blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). Our liver cells release ALT when they are damaged or die. Healthy ALT levels for men are up to 30, and for women they are up to 19. Your ALT level is 40, however each individual lab has its unique healthy range, so 40 may not be considered unhealthy by their measurement.
      Generally, hepatitis B does not cause abdominal pain, including chest pains, because there are few sensory nerves around the liver. Please consult with your doctor and see if your symptoms are caused by another medical condition.
      Keep getting monitored, eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and remember to practice safe sex to avoid spreading the infection. Good luck.

  245. Hello Dr i this is my results , any advice

    EP “B” CORE Ab (HBcAb) = POSITIVE
    HEP “B” CORE IgM (HBcIgM)= NEGATIVE
    HEP “B” SURFACE Ag Quant =13000 IU/ml

    HEP “B” SURFACE Ab (HBsAB)= NEGATIVE
    HEP “B” SURFACE VALUE = 0.00 mIU/mL
    HEP “B”e ANTIGEN (HBeAg) = NEGATIVE
    HEP “B”e ANTIBODY (HBeAb) = POSITIVE

    1. Hello: Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Your HBsAb negative tests shows your immune system hasn’t generated enough surface antibodies yet to eradicate the surface antigen. The good news is you test negative for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) and positive for the “e” antibody (HBeAb), which means your immune system is fighting the infection. Also, when you are E antigen negative, it means your viral load is probably not high. The core antibody (HBcAb) result also means you have been infected in the past. This is the first “antibody” against hepatitis B to appear.
      You must get tested again in six months to find out if this is a new or acute infection, or if you were infected during early childhood and have a chronic or long-term infection. If you continue to test positive for HBsAg, you should also get a test to see if you have experienced any liver damage. Good luck.

      1. Hello Dr,

        Thank you very much for your responds and Yesi eat healthy ,Dandelion,Ginger and Garlic are common in my meals. Please Dr i would like to know and learn more as im not happy about this deadly disease , i dont even know how i got this because i do practice safe sex (NO CONDOM NO SEX ),Please According to my results do you think my immune system can fight off the infection and become immune if i keep eating healthy ? Because i dont Smoke nor Drink Alcohol …

        Worried Curtis

        1. Hello: No one can say if and when you will clear the infection. It depends on many factors, but you can increase your chances of living a long and healthy life (with or without hepatitis B) by continuing your healthy lifestyle. Good luck.

  246. hello, Dr. My father’s : Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg)-REACTIVE
    Hepatitis C Antibodies (Anti HCV)-NONREACTIVE
    Hepatitis B ‘e’ Antigen (HBeAg)-NONREACTIVE
    USG reveals
    Grade I fatty liver.
    Please explain it. what is the case..

    1. Hello: As your father’s doctor probably explained, because he tests positive or reactive for the Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg), he has hepatitis B. If he continues to test positive for Hepatitis B Surface Antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months, it means he is chronically infected. The good news is he is not infected with hepatitis C.
      Because he does not test “reactive” for Hepatitis B ‘e’ Antigen (HBeAg), it means his viral load may not be very high.
      Fatty liver occurs when someone is overweight and has fat in his liver. The combination of hepatitis B and fatty liver can accelerate liver damage.
      Has he been tested for liver damage? This is indicated through an ultrasound and from a simple blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). So please continue to have him monitored for both viral load (HBV DNA) and liver damage, and keep consulting with his doctor. In the meantime, get him to eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Your family should all be tested for hepatitis B and vaccinated. Good luck.

  247. i had been vaccinated in childhood for hepatitus b , and before complete 3 doses of vaccination, my status was hbsag non reactive, while i was 2 years old, now i am 24, just from some routine blood tests, my reports read that i am hbsag reactive.

    liver function test are normal except sgot= 38 and sgpt= 55, liver fibroscan (elasticity measurement-liver stiffness value is 5.3 kpa).

    hepatitis B e antibody is reactive with value 0.010

    hepatitus B e antigen is non reactive with value of 0.31.

    qualitative HBV DNA Reports are awaited…..

    what is the current status of my infection, is it acute or chronic ??

    how is it possible vaccine dint work for me and now i am hbsag reactive ??

    can the reports be wrong ?? i am very much worried……please explain

    1. A person is considered chronically infected if they continue to test HBsAg positive for longer than 6 months. You can talk to your doctor about an anti-HBc IgM test, though it is not always definitive.

      I’m not sure what to say about your test results. It would appear that you have an infection and that there is no false positive. I know this is very unsettling. There is a percentage of the population that does not respond to the HBV vaccine. It’s possible you did not have an adequate response to the vaccine, or perhaps you had been infected prior to when you were first vaccinated? You can really only guess about the timing. Talk to your doctor and learn more about your HBV and the health of your liver. It’s disconcerting to not know how you got the virus, but many out there living with it have no idea. The best thing you can do is move forward with it. Take a deep breath and take it one step at a time. Check out our website at http://www.hepb.org

      1. how is hbeag negative when hbsag is positive…….i dont understand this thing…..

        also what is the possibility of hbsag being false positive …?? shall i repeat the tests again ?

        1. Hello: As our immune systems fight the hepatitis B infection, it creates antibodies to eradicate each hepatitis B viral antigen. One of the first antigens that our immune system clears is the hepatitis B core antigen, after this is cleared, the next antigen to disappear is the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg). This antigen is present when we have lots of virus in our body, so it’s a good thing when we clear HBeAg. The next and last antigen to disappear is the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). HBsAg is created in large quantities, and researchers believe it is this antigen that keeps our immune system from finally clearing the infection. It is not uncommon at all to test negative for HBeAg (and positive for the hepatitis B “e” antibody) and continue to test positive for HBsAg. Good luck.

  248. Hello Dr i this is my results>

    HBsAg-Pozitiv more than 6 mouths
    HBeAG-Negativ
    Anti HBs-Negativ
    Anti HBc-Pozitiv
    Anti HBe-Pozitiv

    1. Hello: Because you have tested positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months, it means you have a chronic infection. The good news is you test negative for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg), which means your viral load (HBV DNA) may not be high.
      Keep in mind that not everyone with hepatitis B require treatment, many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B especially if they eat healthy food and avoid alcohol and cigarettes.
      Generally, medical guidelines recommend treatment if you are experiencing liver damage. This is indicated by an ultrasound and a simple blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT), which you should ask your doctor about. Our liver cells release ALT when they are damaged or die. Healthy ALT levels for men are up to 30, and for women they are up to 19. Please consult with your doctor and see what your ALT levels are to determine if you require treatment. If you ever do, there are two very effective antiviral medications that are recommended: tenofovir (Viread) and entecavir. Good luck.

  249. Hello doctor.
    Now i’m studying in china, and i was tested for having hep b. The result is:
    Hbsag +
    hbeag+
    hbsab
    hbeab
    hbcab+
    hbv-dna 3.89+05
    alt 48
    ast 24
    Could you say me what does this results means?
    P.s. sorry for bad English
    sincerely

    1. Hello: I am assuming you are in your 20s? Have your parents or siblings also been tested for hepatitis B yet?
      When we are first infected, especially at birth or during early childhood, we often have lots of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in our bodies that are rapidly replicating in our liver. When we’re infected as newborns or children, our immature immune systems don’t recognize or fight HBV, instead it “tolerates” the infection. During this immune-tolerant phase with rapid HBV replication, we usually test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg), as you have. This stage can last a few years or even into our 30s or 40s. Eventually, our immune system notices the infection and starts generating “e” antibodies (HBeAb) to eradicate the “e” antigen, and we move out of the immune-tolerant stage.
      We can transmit hepatitis B through our blood and body fluids as long as we test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Our chance of spreading it is higher when we’re HBeAg-positive and have lots of HBV in our blood.
      If you become a surgeon, and are at high risk of needle sticks or sharps injuries, you may want to be treated with antivirals in order to lower your viral load and risk to your patients. If you are not, you pose no health risk to patients.
      Your ALT level, at 48, is probably at the high range of normal. It is important that you continue to be monitored, especially your ALT levels, to make sure the infection is not harming your liver. Good luck.

      1. Thank you for answering me.
        So you mean that I have chronic form of hep”b”? Can I recover from this disease?
        By the well, when people is testing for HIV they also is testing for hbv or not?
        I just was tested for HIV before going abroad and the results was negative

        1. Hello: If you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months, it means you are chronically infected. When healthy adults are infected, it takes their immune systems about six months to clear the infection. When people have infections that last longer than six months, it means they were probably infected as children and have a long-term or chronic infection.
          HIV and hepatitis B are two separate tests. Depending what your doctor is testing for, both tests may be performed. Good luck.

          1. it’s my first positive test. I was tested for any diseases before going to China, and my results was good. But here in China, I was tested again and was discovered that I have positive reaction for HBS and HBE. Does that mean that I got hep”b” just few months ago?

          2. Hello: It is possible you were recently infected. When healthy adults are infected, they generally experience an acute infection, and their immune systems are able to clear the infection within six months. When newborns or children are infected, their immune systems don’t recognize the virus and the infection becomes chronic and can last many years. Please get tested again in six months to find out if you are still infected. Meanwhile, please avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and practice safe sex. Good luck.

  250. I am Male 37 yrs old. Please find my results below and advice. I am having chronic Hep B for the past 10 yrs as far i know, after found this disease during a blood donation. Not taking any medications currently.
    One specific question – Is Paleo diet (low carb high FAT (LCHF) will cause any problem for chronic Hep B carriers? Looking for your advice.

    Test results
    ————-
    HBsAg Screening reactive(>250.00)

    Anti-HBC IgM (IgM Ab to hep-B core Ag) – non-reactive (0.04)
    Anti-HBc Total (Ab to Hep-B Core Ag) – reactive (11.47)
    Anti HBe-Ab to Hepatitis B Envelope Ag – reactive (0.02)
    HBeAg – hepatitis B envelope Antigen – non-reactive (0.350)

    HBV – Hepatitis B viral load (quantitative) – 1,892 IU/mL
    Log Value – 3.28
    HBV – Hepatitis B Viral Load – 11,011 copies/ml

    SGOT – 18.5
    SGPT – 26
    BILIRUBIN – TOTAL – 0.82
    BILIRUBIN – DIRECT – 0.25
    BILIRUBIN (INDIRECT) – 0.57
    GGT – 19.9

    ALBUMIN – SERUM – 4.2
    SERUM GLOBULIN – 2.9
    SERUM ALBUMIN/GLOBULIN RATIO – 1.45

    Thanks