Hep B Blog

Tag Archives: liver cancer

Clinical Trials in Liver Cancer: What You Need to Know

diversegroupMyth: Clinical trials are only for people with advanced stages of cancer.

Fact: No! Trials are available for all stages of cancer, not just for people who have advanced cancer that is not responding to treatment.

If you or a loved one needs treatment for liver cancer, clinical trials are an option to think about. Continue reading "Clinical Trials in Liver Cancer: What You Need to Know"

HBV Journal Review – January 2015

ChrisKHBF is pleased to connect our blog readers to Christine Kukka’s monthly HBV Journal Review that she writes for the HBV Advocate. The journal presents the
 latest in hepatitis B research, treatment, and prevention from recent academic and medical journals. This month, the following topics are explored:

  • Having Hepatitis B and a Family Member with Cancer Raises Cancer Risk Dramatically
  • VA Tests Only 21.8% of Its Patients for Hepatitis B, Missing Many at Risk of Infection
  • Research Shows Importance of HBV Screening Before Chemotherapy Begins
  • Younger Age and Low HBsAgLevels Benefit Patients Who Stop Antivirals
  • Doctors Debate Benefits of Interferon vs. Antiviral Treatment
  • New Study Finds Fibroscan Accuracy on Par with Liver Biopsies
  • Mild Kidney Problems and Bone Loss Linked to Antivirals
  • Hepatitis B Vaccine Effectiveness Challenged

Continue reading "HBV Journal Review – January 2015"

AASLD 2014 Liver Meeting – HBV Coverage

Unknown-5Get HBV Advocate’s Christine Kukka’s take on the top HBV related, published reports from the AASLD Liver Meeting as she provides her Top Ten List! 

 

Top Ten Reports from the 65th Annual Liver Meeting
By Christine M. Kukka, HBV Advocate 

Hepatitis B experts from around the world met at the 65th annual American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) conference in Washington D.C. this week to share the latest in hepatitis B treatment and research.

  1.  Which combination of antivirals and interferon works best against hepatitis B
  2. Tenofovir continues to excel with no signs of drug resistance after eight years
  3. Tenofovir treatment is safe over an entire pregnancy for both mother and child
  4. Tenofovir and entecavir combination successful against drug-resistant HBV
  5. Who remains at risk for hepatitis B in the U.S.?
  6. Antivirals appear to lower liver cancer risk
  7. But antivirals don’t reduce cancer risk in older patients with cirrhosis
  8. How long do patients have to keep taking antivirals after they lose HBeAg and achieve undetectable viral load?
  9. Liver cancer risk remains, even after HBsAg clearance in older, male patients
  10. Experts say treatment is needed when ALT levels are only moderately elevated

Continue reading "AASLD 2014 Liver Meeting – HBV Coverage"

HBV Journal Review – November 2014

ChrisKHBF is pleased to connect our blog readers to Christine Kukka’s monthly HBV Journal Review that she writes for the HBV Advocate. The journal presents the
 latest in hepatitis B research, treatment, and prevention from recent academic and medical journals. This month, the following topics are explored:

  • Experts Say Breastfeeding While Taking Antivirals Is Safe
  • Doctors Fail to Adequately Treat HBV-Infected Women After Childbirth
  • Doctors Continue to Fail to Screen Asian-Americans for Hepatitis B
  • Statins Protect Hepatitis B Patients Against Heart Disease and Liver Cancer
  • New Study Finds Antivirals Lower Liver Cancer Risk
  • Studies Find Tenofovir Lowers Viral Load Faster Than Entecavir
  • Liver Transplants Safe in Older Hepatitis B Patients
  • Scientists Develop Micro Weapon to Disable HBV’s Cancer-Causing X Protein
  • Foreign-Born U.S. Residents Less Likely to Be Immunized
  • Antivirals Can Safely Replace HBIG Following Liver Transplantation
  • All Hepatitis B Patients Appear at Risk from Chemotherapy

Continue reading "HBV Journal Review – November 2014"

Fighting the Doom and Gloom: Prevention Works!

laos_mother_and_child
Hepatitis B vaccination event in Laos.

In recognition of Liver Cancer Awareness Month, Liver Cancer Connect is highlighting some of the advances in prevention, screening, and treatment that are leading to increased survival among people with liver cancer. Continue reading "Fighting the Doom and Gloom: Prevention Works!"

It’s Time to Take On the Deadliest Cancers

congressional briefing
Congressional briefing organized by the Deadliest Cancers Coalition with the Congressional Caucus on Deadliest Cancers, Thursday, June 19, 2014, Washington, DC

Recent projections for the top cancer killers in 2030 confirmed some encouraging trends but also sounded a warning bell. Continue reading "It’s Time to Take On the Deadliest Cancers"

Do You Know Your Hepatitis Facts from Fiction?

Hepatitis-Awareness-Month(2)
May is Hepatitis Awareness Month!

In recognition of May as Hepatitis Awareness Month, Liver Cancer Connect reviews some important facts and dangerous fiction about chronic hepatitis B and C- the world’s leading causes of liver cancer.  Continue reading "Do You Know Your Hepatitis Facts from Fiction?"

Deadliest Cuts of All

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Just 8 cancers (ovary, myeloma, brain, stomach, esophagus, lung, liver, and pancreas) will cause nearly half of all cancer deaths in 2014.

Joining a deadly cancers “club” is not on anyone’s wish list. Yet Liver Cancer Connect, a dedicated program of the Hepatitis B Foundation, welcomed the opportunity to become a member of the Deadliest Cancers Coalition.

The Coalition was established in 2008 by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network and other patient advocacy organizations and professional societies.

The group addresses policy issues related to the nation’s deadliest (recalcitrant) cancers. These are defined as the cancers that have 5-year relative survival rates below 50%.

While various types of cancers fit this definition, it is worth noting that nearly half of the 585,720 cancer deaths expected in 2014 will be caused by eight deadly cancers: ovary, myeloma, brain, stomach, esophagus, lung, liver, and pancreas.

Over the past 40 years, the overall 5-year relative survival rate for all cancers has increased from about 50% to 68%. This encouraging progress was mainly thanks to significant federal funding, through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) – the world’s premier supporter of biomedical research – and the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Those federal funds have been matched by investments from pharmaceutical companies, nongovernmental organizations, and states.

But some cancers have not even reached the 50% survival benchmark, let alone surpassed it. To improve survival and outcomes for people with these deadliest cancers, Congress passed the landmark 2012 Recalcitrant Cancer Research Act.  The law calls on NCI, which is a part of NIH, to develop scientific frameworks to help improve outcomes for people who have cancers with very low survival rates.

Unfortunately, continued budget cuts have led to a 23 percent reduction in NIH’s capacity to fund much-needed medical research, including research that can improve survival rates. And the squabbling over future budgets continues.

To stop further funding cuts, the members of the Deadliest Cancers Coalition are rallying their grassroots organizations to contact congressional representatives and urge them to safeguard federal funding for NIH, including NCI.

That some cancers have survival rates below 50% is deeply troubling. But the funding cuts that threaten cancer research are even more disturbing. In fact, they’re deadly.

The World’s Second Deadliest Cancer Is …Preventable

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Liver cancer is the world’s second leading cause of cancer deaths, according to the latest World Cancer Report 2014 released by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), which is the specialized cancer agency of the World Health Organization (WHO). About 800,000 deaths per year are related to liver cancer. Continue reading "The World’s Second Deadliest Cancer Is …Preventable"

Fighting FHC: A Family’s Battle Against a Rare Liver Cancer

In recognition of Rare Diseases Day today, Liver Cancer Connect is honored to feature an article by guest blogger, Gail Trecosta. Gail’s son is fighting a rare form of liver cancer.

MatthewWe’ve all heard or seen heartbreaking stories of children with cancer. Ours began in October 2012. Our world turned upside down when our 13-year-old son was diagnosed with fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma (FHC).

Continue reading "Fighting FHC: A Family’s Battle Against a Rare Liver Cancer"