Hep B Blog

Changing Jobs? How to Find the Best Employer Health Plan When You Have Hepatitis B

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By Christine Kukka

You’ve just landed a new job with a better paycheck, but how do you make sure your new health plan covers the tests, doctor visits and medications needed for your or a family member’s hepatitis B?

Many people with chronic medical conditions find switching health plans can affect the quality of their medical care and requires a careful calculation of what their out-of-pocket healthcare costs may be in the year ahead.  There’s a lot to consider and doing your homework is essential to finding the best employer insurance plan for your health and your wallet. Two key questions to ask are:

Can I keep the same family doctor and/or liver specialist?  You don’t want to lose the expertise and personal rapport you may have developed with a provider. And, hepatitis B specialists are few and far between in many regions. Find out what doctors and specialists the new plan covers. Some plans offer several options, so find out which one covers your doctor. If the new plan doesn’t include your liver specialist, are you willing to pay extra to stay with him or her? For more information about health insurance terms and shopping for a plan, click here.

How do you make sure the new plan covers your drugs and lab tests? And how do you find this out without disclosing your hepatitis B? First, you cannot be denied coverage — or a job — because of your hepatitis B. The Affordable Care Act prohibits employers from denying anyone coverage because of a pre-existing health condition. However, you need to do your homework and look carefully at the deductibles, copays and coinsurance a plan offers.

When you are offered the job, or when you go for your benefits interview with the HR rep after accepting the job, ask for a copy of their health insurance plan and read it over carefully. It may be available online.  Ideally, you want coverage that covers the most and costs the least after you add up your monthly premiums (the amount you pay each month toward insurance coverage) and the copays (the portion you pay for drugs, lab tests, and doctor visits.)

If you or your family’s medical costs are high, you may find that selecting a plan with a high monthly premium may be the most affordable because your copays for tests and medications will be low.

To find out what costs you can expect (knowing you can’t predict every future medical event), try this exercise. Find out how much you paid during the past year for both premiums and out-of-pocket copays for drugs, lab tests, and doctor visits.

Now look at your new plan’s options. Assuming you have the same prescriptions, lab tests and doctor visits, how much would you pay under the new plan? If you have a choice of plans, apply the same test to each. Which plan is the least expensive when both copays and premiums are added up?

Look at a plan’s prescription pricing carefully. While health plans can’t openly refuse to insure people with costly, pre-existing conditions, some inflate the amount you pay for the two leading hepatitis B antiviral drugs (Viread and generic entecavir) to deliberately discourage people with chronic hepatitis B from choosing their health plans.

Every insurance plan has a drug formula overview in its description, which you have access to. It assigns a price “tier” to each drug. A low-cost generic antibiotic may be a Tier 1 and cost you only a $5 copay while a new, brand-name drug is assigned a pricier Tier 4 or 5 ranking and could be extremely expensive.

Look up any medications you are currently taking, or may take in the near future. For example, if your doctor has warned you that an antiviral may be in your future if your liver enzyme tests continue to rise, you will want to review your plan’s pricing for entecavir or tenofovir. If the health plan charges a high monthly copay for a generic antiviral such as entecavir, you may be able to file a complaint. Email the Hepatitis B Foundation at info@hepb.org for more information.

Reviewing health insurance coverage details isn’t easy, but it’s important to make sure your new health plan will be the best for you and your family.

What do you do if there is a one- or two-month lag before your new coverage begins? When you leave a job, you may be able to keep your old job’s health insurance coverage for several months. This is called COBRA continuation coverage. Under COBRA, you usually have to pay the entire monthly premium yourself, plus a small administrative fee. This may be costly, but if it provides good coverage and if you’re due for your annual physical, lab tests and ultrasound, or if you need to continue antivirals, it may be a good option.

Another option is the Health Insurance Marketplace . Also known as “Obamacare,” this helps uninsured people find and apply for quality, affordable health coverage, and low and middle-income people may qualify for lower costs based on their household size and income. Losing your health insurance because you’re changing jobs may qualify as a “life changing event” that allows you to apply. For more information on marketplace health plans and hepatitis B, please click here.

Another option is short-term or temporary health insurance coverage. For more information click here.

Comments on this blog are closed. If you have questions about hepatitis B or this blog post, please email info@hepb.org or call 215-489-4900.

One thought on “Changing Jobs? How to Find the Best Employer Health Plan When You Have Hepatitis B”

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