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Hepatitis B Foundation hosts Princeton Workshop on Liver Cancer

princeton workshop 2022

Lewis Roberts, MB, ChB, PhD, Mayo Clinic professor of medicine, (right, foreground) was one of attendees at the 2022 Princeton Workshop

The Hepatitis B Foundation hosted 30 top scientists and physicians from across the U.S. for a day-long meeting April 28 on "Liver Cancer Risk, Prevention and Early Detection: Challenges and Opportunities to Improve Outcomes."

It was the 2022 Princeton Workshop, which was held first in 1995 in Princeton, N.J. 

This year's co-chairs were Chari Cohen, DrPH, MPH, senior vice president of the Hepatitis B Foundation, and Brian McMahon, MD, scientific and medical director of the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium.Princeton Workshop group 28April2022

Participants are affiliated with Baylor College of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania and other leading research and health care institutions.

You can read about the history here.

About Hepatitis B:  The most common serious liver infection in the world, it is caused by the hepatitis B virus, which attacks and injures the liver. Each year up to 1 million people die from hepatitis B worldwide, even though it is preventable and treatable. The number of adults living in the U.S. who have chronic hepatitis B infection may be as high as 2.4 million, which is nearly three times greater than the federal government’s official estimate, according to a new report by a team of public health experts, scientists and physicians. Hepatitis B is a “silent epidemic” because most people do not have symptoms when they are newly or chronically infected. Thus, they can unknowingly infect others and continue the spread of hepatitis B. For people who are chronically infected but don’t have any symptoms, their livers are still being silently damaged, which can develop into serious liver disease such as cirrhosis or liver cancer.

About the Hepatitis B Foundation: We are the nation’s leading nonprofit organization solely dedicated to finding a cure for hepatitis B and improving the quality of life for those affected worldwide through research, education and patient advocacy. Founded in 1991, the Hepatitis B Foundation is based in Doylestown, Pa., with an office in Washington, D.C. To learn more, go to www.hepb.org, read our blog at hepb.org/blog, follow us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook (@hepbfoundation) or call us at 215-489-4900. To donate, contact Jean Holmes at 215-489-4900 or jean.holmes@hepb.org.