Hep B Blog

Ten Things You Should Know About Hepatitis B and Do in 2017

Image courtesy of krishna arts at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of krishna arts at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

By Christine Kukka

It’s 2017, and experts around the world continue to study the complex life cycle of the hepatitis B virus in order to find a chink in its armor that will lead to a cure. In 2016, there were successes and disappointments in the research and healthcare arena. Here is what you need to know about hepatitis B in 2017.

If you’re taking tenofovir, ask your doctor about TAF if you’re experiencing kidney problems or bone loss, especially if you’re an older woman. If you’re taking the antiviral tenofovir (Viread) long-term, ask your doctor about replacing it with TAF (Vemlidy). TAF is a reformulated version of tenofovir that delivers the antiviral more effectively to liver cells at a lower dose.  Currently, doctors prescribe either tenofovir or entecavir for liver damage. Entecavir does not cause bone loss, but it doesn’t work in people who have developed drug resistance to lamivudine or adefovir. For them, tenofovir is the only option, but it can cause bone loss and kidney problems when used long-term. With the U.S. Food and Drug’s recent approval of TAF, consumers can now get tenofovir’s robust antiviral activity at a lower dose. Because it’s brand new, your provider may not know about it, so ask about it to see if it would be better for you.

Was medical or recreational marijuana just approved in your state? Exercise caution. Many in the hepatitis C community have used medically-prescribed marijuana to ease side effects from interferon for years, so many assume it’s also safe for people with hepatitis B. Unfortunately, there are no studies that conclusively prove its safety. One study  that monitored liver fibrosis in 700 people coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C found, “…no evidence for an association between cannabis (marijuana) smoking and significant liver fibrosis progression in HIV/HCV coinfection.”

But another study  concluded: “Cell culture and animal model studies support that (marijuana) could have a therapeutic effect on liver injury and fibrosis progression. However, three cross-sectional studies in patients with chronic hepatitis C suggest that daily cannabis use is associated with fibrosis and steatosis.”

There is also no information indicating if marijuana is safer when it’s consumed in edibles vs. smoked, though many assume smoking introduces more toxins and chemical to the body. Bottom line: Just because your state approved it doesn’t mean marijuana is safe for you. Talk to your doctor and watch for more studies.

Image courtesy of Nanhatai8 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.
Image courtesy of Nanhatai8 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Fight for affordable healthcare for all. Newly-elected federal officials are threatening to fundamentally change a variety of healthcare insurance programs serving moderate- and low-income Americans and roll back protections, including mandated coverage of pre-existing conditions like hepatitis B. Many of these programs and coverage mandates have helped people living with hepatitis B get the care and medications they need. If you want these programs and safeguards to remain, you’re going to have to fight for them. Please check the Hep B United’s website regularly to learn about what is happening with hepatitis B on the federal level, and what you can do as an advocate.

Don’t give up hope. We know it’s been a tough year and that some promising drugs that were in clinical trials were shelved, but don’t give in to despair. There are more drugs in the works. Keep checking the Drug Watch page and clinical trials page to learn the latest.

Get monitored regularly. No one likes a blood draw, but it’s important to be tested annually or more often if you have a high viral load and/or signs of liver damage. There may not be a cure yet, but there are effective treatment options. Be brave, protect your health, and go to the lab for your blood test.

Demand to be screened for liver cancer. Some experts say current medical guidelines don’t go far enough to screen us for liver cancer. So take charge of your health and ask for a liver cancer screen, which includes a semi-annual blood test and an ultrasound.  Hepatitis B-infected Asian men (or of Asian descent) over age 40 years and Asian women over age 50 years, patients with a family history of liver cancer, patients with cirrhosis, and Africans over the age of 20 should all be screened. Think you’re not at risk for cancer because you take antivirals? Think again. Antivirals help reduce liver damage, but if you’ve had cirrhosis or are older, the risk of liver cancer remains.

If someone promises a new cure or treatment that sounds too good to be true….it probably is. In our search to be rid of hepatitis B, we may be tempted to yield to clever marketing and try a supplement that promises to cure us. But first, do your homework and practice precaution. To check out an herbal supplement, visit the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health’s website to see what scientific evidence exists for a supplement and talk to your doctor. There is no magic bullet that will cure hepatitis B. Experts hope to find one soon, but for now be patient and stay skeptical. If you want to safeguard your health, eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes.

Pregnant with hepatitis B? Get your viral load tested and ask your doctor about antivirals. The American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) recommends that pregnant women with viral loads (HBV DNA) higher than 200,000 IU/mL (or 1 million copies/mL) receive an antiviral (either tenofovir or telbivudine). The antivirals won’t hurt you or your baby and will reduce the risk that your baby will be infected with hepatitis B to nearly zero, as long as your baby gets the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine and a dose of HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) within 12 hours of birth.

Fight discrimination against hepatitis B and know your rights. Hepatitis B should never be a barrier to the education or job you want. Sadly, ignorance and stigma persist. It depends on us, our friends, and our family, to stand up and fight for our civil rights. We can’t back down. If we don’t fight, who will?

Be brave, disclose, and get your friends, family, and lovers screened for hepatitis B and vaccinated. Yes, it will be one of the hardest conversations you will ever have, but if you are infected with hepatitis B, you need to disclose your infection to people who may be at risk. If you just discovered you have chronic hepatitis B, which you may have contracted at birth, you need to tell your siblings and your mother and get them screened and immunized if needed. Dating someone, and about to take the next step? You need to disclose ahead of time and give them information and choices. It builds trust and it’s the right thing to do. You would want the same for yourself. For more on disclosure click here.

Happy 2017!  Our hope for a cure continues.

As of January 2017, TAF has been approved for hepatitis B treatment in the U.S., Europe and Japan.

Comments on this blog are closed. If you have questions about hepatitis B or this blog post, please email info@hepb.org or call 215-489-4900.

63 thoughts on “Ten Things You Should Know About Hepatitis B and Do in 2017”

  1. GFR count went down to 58 after 8 months on tenofovir. all other test are normal including ALT, undetectable Viral load. Any idea why? I stopped taking the medicine for three months and will be tested again. is their an alternative med in case tenofovir is hurting my kidneys

    1. Hello: There is a new and effective treatment using tenofovir that contains a reformulated, low-dose version. It is called TAF or tenofovir alafenamide. It has been approved or use in the U.S., Europe and Japan. Good luck.

      1. GFR is back to above 60 (normal)and still off tenofovir. Wondering if it is common for people to see their GFR number impacted by the treatment and for how long?

        Can someone restart the treatment if the viral load goes back up?

        will find out in two weeks if the viral count went back up after being off the medicine for the last three months.

        Thank you again, you guys are great!

        1. Hello: One of the common side effects from the antiviral tenofovir is impacting kidney function. A blood test checks your GFR, which tells how well your kidneys are filtering. I’m glad to hear your kidney function is returning to normal.
          If your viral load (HBV DNA) rebounds and your ALT/SGPT indicate liver damage, your doctor can of course put you back on antivirals. I don’t know where you live but a new, lower-dose formulation of tenofovir is available in the U.S., Japan and Europe. It causes fewer side effects on your kidneys and is just as effective (possibly even better) than conventional tenofovir that you have been taking. Good luck with your follow-up visit.
          One of the ranging debates is when doctors can safely take people off antivirals without risking a dangerous reactivation of the hepatitis B.
          Good luck.

          1. My DNA count was under 20 when on tenofovir
            But GFR went down to 58.
            New blood work shows improvement but DNA count is now detected:
            GFR > 60
            DNA COUNT 146
            Alt is 18
            AST 20
            Hep b surface antigen : positive
            Hep b e antigen : negative
            Hep b sab : negative
            Hep b core ab : positive

            Can you interpret the tests and advice if you think one should go back on antiviral med with numbers above? Any other tests need to get? How often should the test be repeated?
            Thanks.

          2. Hello: How long ago did you stop taking tenofovir?
            Your tests continue to look good. Your viral load (HBV DNA) is still very low at 146 IU/mL, and your liver enzyme level of ALT 18 shows you are not experiencing any liver damage.
            Please keep getting monitored regularly, but so far your lab tests look good. Good luck.

          3. It has been 3 months since I stopped taking
            Tenofovir. You think I should get back on it with the test results I shared with you? How often should one repeat these blood tests? Can you please interpret these results for me?

            Thanks.

          4. Hello: I believe your test results showed no liver damage and low viral load, so you do not need to get back on treatment, based on current medical guidelines. Continue to get tested at least every three to six months, whatever your doctor recommends. Good luck.

  2. Good day, i am robin, 27 years old. In 2015 i know that I carried hepatitis B virus.
    I talk with bangladeshi doctor. They give me some medicine.

    Last year i come to japan. Now i live in japan. I want to tritement hepatitis B virus.

    But i dont know how can I find out a good doctor in japan.
    if possible please give me some suggestions .

    Thank you

    1. Hi Robin
      Will u please tell me how u reached japan when you r in carrier stage.and what medicine u got from bangladeshi doctor.
      Thank u

    1. Hello: Not soon enough, but experts around the world are far closer to finding a cure than ever. They predict they will find a cure in the next few years, and we remain optimistic.
      Good luck.

  3. they lies because they dont have hepa b virus in their blood if they have so they put their heart and soul to find a cure very soon they are just pass their time in labs

    1. Hello: Please know the Hepatitis B Foundation is doing all it can to find a cure for hepatitis B. Many of us who work for the foundation have themselves been affected by hepatitis B. This is more than a job, it is a passion and believe me, we are hoping for and working for a cure. Good luck.

    1. Hello: I’m not sure I understand your question, but hepatitis B is known as the silent infection because it rarely causes any symptoms. There are very few sensory nerves around the liver, so an infection is rarely felt there.
      Not everyone with hepatitis B requires treatment, many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B. Generally, medical guidelines recommend treatment only if you are experiencing liver damage. This is indicated by an ultrasound and a simple blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). Our liver cells release ALT when they are damaged or die. Healthy ALT levels for men are up to 30, and for women they are up to 19. Please consult with your doctor and see what your ALT levels are to determine if you require treatment. Good luck.
      If you ever do, there are two very effective antiviral medications that are recommended: tenofovir (Viread) and entecavir. Good luck.

  4. SGPT=43.70
    HBV DNA=34.129 IU/ML
    Can you interpret the tests and advice..Thanks

    1. Hello: SGPT is an enzyme that our liver cells release when they are damaged. Average or healthy SGPT levels range up to about 40 in men and 19 in women.
      It appears you are not experiencing any liver damage, and your viral load (HBV DNA) is very low, both of these are good signs. Keep leading a healthy lifestyle, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, practice safe sex and make sure your family members are tested and vaccinated. Good luck.

        1. Hello: As you may know, when you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it means you are infected with hepatitis B.
          Keep in mind that not everyone with hepatitis B requires treatment, many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B. Generally, medical guidelines recommend treatment only if you are experiencing liver damage. This is indicated by an ultrasound and a simple blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). Our liver cells release ALT when they are damaged or die. Healthy ALT levels for men are up to 30, and for women they are up to 19. Please consult with your doctor and see what your ALT levels are to determine if you require treatment.
          If you ever do, there are two very effective antiviral medications that are recommended: tenofovir (Viread) and entecavir. Good luck.

  5. Hello,my viral load is 704 iu/ml my doctor tells me not to start on drugs yet . I feel that if I started early then I have a better chance of clearing it . what’s ur opinion. Am currently using black seed oil will it help?

    1. Hello: Medical guidelines do not recommend treatment unless your viral load (HBV DNA) is high and you have signs of liver damage, indicated by a high liver enzyme level (ALT or SGPT) or an ultrasound examination of your liver.
      Your viral load at 704 IU/mL is quite low, which is good news. Do you have signs of liver damage?
      Unfortunately, black seed oil and other supplements have not been found to reduce liver damage or cure hepatitis B. Also, some of these supplements can actually cause more liver damage.
      Please consult with your doctor. Good luck.

  6. Hi dear professor. My HBV viral load PCR is 28. I’m taking adefovir about 10 years. My ALT and ASt enzymes are normal. I’m wondering if i could get your opinion. Many thanks

    1. Hello: Unfortunately, the only way to find out if you have were recently infected and have an acute (short-term) hepatitis B infection is to wait the six months after your March test and get retested. If you have lost the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) at that point and developed surface antibodies (HBsAb), then it was an acute infection.
      If you continue to test positive for hepatitis B, it means you were probably infected during childhood.
      If it is available to you, we recommend you get a viral load (HBV DNA) test, this will help your doctor understand what stage of infection you are in if you continue to test positive for hepatitis B after your next test.
      The good news is your liver enzyme (SGPT) indicate no liver damage. Good luck.

        1. Hello: What does your lab define as a healthy SGPT level? Some labs consider 30 to 40 in the healthy range. You need to know your viral load (HBV DNA) and also if you test positive for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) or “e” antibody for a full picture to know if you require treatment.
          Talk to your doctor, the World Health Organization has hepatitis B testing and treatment guidelines that you can review with your doctor at: http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/hepatitis/hepatitis-b-guidelines/en/
          Good luck.

  7. My sgpt results 83 ,and having experience pain at my right side .i had also polyp on my gallbladder… is it gb the cause of this pain or the liver has already damage?im now thinkin cirrhosis becoz this mild pain ive felt a long time ago,and now the pain getting worst..after taking a bath i experience itching. I consulted the doctor many times she always suggesting me to go ct scan..whch so expensive in Philippines..

    1. Hello: I am sorry to hear about your discomfort. There are very few sensory nerves around the liver, so it’s unusual to feel abdominal pain from hepatitis B. Gall bladder problems certain cause abdominal pain and discomfort. (For more information on this, please read: http://www.hepb.org/blog/when-is-that-pain-hep-b-related-and-when-is-it-something-else/
      Having said that, your liver enzymes (SGPT) is elevated, indicating some liver damage. Do you know what your viral load (HBV DNA) is? Also, have you had a liver ultrasound? Those two tests will give your doctor more information about your liver health, and will help your doctor determine if your pain is hepatitis B-related or caused by another medical condition. Good luck.

      1. You mean having hbv can’t feel any mild point pain?maybe ths pain is the gallbladder.By next day i will go for ultrasound again..my hbv dna 2yrs ago only 23ul and 134 ,the gbpolyp size got almost 8mm.. any good news for the cure Sir?anyway thanks for ur reply

  8. Here are my results, Plz suggest
    HBsAG – Positive
    HBeAG – Non Reactive
    Anti Hbe – Reactive
    SGOT – 28
    SGPT – 38
    HBV Viral Load : 367800 IU/ml
    LFT -Normal
    Ultrasound : Normal

    1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. The good news is you test negative for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) and positive for the “e” antibody (anti HBe), however, your viral load at 367,800 IU/mL continues to be high.
      Your liver tests do not show any liver damage, however because of your high viral load, it’s important to continue to be monitored regularly.
      If this is the first time you have tested positive for hepatitis B, you must get tested again in six months to find out if this is a new or acute infection, or if you were infected during early childhood and have a chronic or long-term infection. Good luck.

      1. Hi. Thank you for the reply. I wish to check what is the probability of the infection being acute in -ve HBeAG scenarios with high Viral Load. Does the possiblility of Acute infection exist in such scenarios? Thank you

          1. Hello: I believe that means you have cleared the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) and now test positive for the “e” antibodies. However, if you are in the midst of seroconverting and developing “e” antibodies, your viral load (HBV DNA) may continue to be elevated for a while. Be sure to keep getting monitored. Good luck.

        1. Hello: Unfortunately, it’s hard to use hepatitis B “e” antigen and antibody and viral load (HBV DNA) to determine whether you have acute or chronic hepatitis B. Unfortunately, you will have to wait six months and get tested again to determine if you have acute or chronic hepatitis B. I know the wait is hard! Good luck.

  9. Hello, I was diagnosed with hepatitis B when symptom of jaundice occured in February 2017. Jaundice and LFT back to normal in two months time.Iam taking one tablet of Tenvir everyday. Do not have any symptoms or problem in daily routine. Iam sharing my current test results. Please give your interpretation on progress of my treatment and if i can get rid of acute infection.

    HBeag negative
    HBsag positive
    Anti hbs negative

    LFT
    Bilirubin 0.81
    Bilirubin Direct 0.21
    Bilirubin indirect 0.60
    AST(SGOT) 27
    ALT (SGPT) 27
    GGTP 34
    ALP 127
    Total protein 8.00
    Albumin 4.75
    A:G ratio 1.46

    Seems my body is not making enough antibodies to fight infection. When my body able to produce that. Iam taking antiviral medicines since last two months.Anything I can do to increase that in my body.

    1. Hello: Was February 2017 the first time you ever tested positive for hepatitis B? I’m glad your health has stabilized. Your ALT/SGPT level of 27 indicates your liver is healthy.
      If February was the first time, you need to be tested again in six months to determine if this was a new infection (acute) that you will be able to clear in six months. If hepatitis B continues for longer than six months, then it is considered a long-term (chronic) infection, and suggests you may have been infected during early childhood.
      The best thing to do during this time is to of course eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and make sure your family has been tested for hepatitis B and vaccinated.
      Good luck.

  10. Hey there hepbtalk,

    This blog/site has helped immensely so thank you for that. It gets right down to the point and has been helpful for my research!

    My dad actually has I guess at this point chronic Hep B and has been taking a tablet of Tenofovir every day since about more than 5 years ago. He has suppressed the virus and there have been no signs (albeit there is a bit of liver damage I believe, but need to double check this) and doctors are keeping him on Tenofovir

    We live in Canada so not sure if that new reformulated Tenofovir is available but I’ll be asking in his next checkup.

    A few questions I had and was hoping you would be able to help:

    1. Is weight loss a symptom that is common in taking tenofovir or having Hep B? Over the years, it’s not a huge drastic plummeting loss but my Dad has gotten a lot skinnier and hasn’t been able to put on weight and he eats normally, doesn’t smoke, doesn’t drink anymore, tries not to eat raw food; so relatively healthy but does like to eat out a lot, but not unhealthy foods. He’s gotten to a point where I’m concerned and worried about his weight and while it is a slow weight loss and not drastic/fast change, I’m wondering if it’s due to the medication for his weight loss. Thoughts on this?

    2. What is the average lifespan for Chronic Hep B patients? Does the medication take a toll on the body as years go by? Are there studies that show lifespan over 70/80 years old?

    Thanks again!

    1. Also!

      Question about Vemildy.. was just reading about it – thoughts on switching to Vemildy even on Tenofovir? There seems to be a lot of side effects that may occur;
      “Worsening of hepatitis B infection. Your hepatitis B (HBV) infection may become worse (flare-up) if you take VEMLIDY and then stop taking it. A “flare-up” is when your HBV infection suddenly returns in a worse way than before”
      This is the same with all meds for hepB but wondering if this has a higher chance of it happening?

      There was another side effect of it having/creating more kidney problems being on it.. so what is different in this med vs tenofovir

      1. Hello: TAF (Vemlidy, the new tenofovir formulation) has a better delivery system, so it’s able to reach the liver more effectively so a lower dose of tenofovir is required. With a lower tenofovir dose, patients are at lower risk of bone loss or reduced kidney function. Stopping TAF carries the same risks as stopping any antiviral. When hepatitis B viral replication is not longer suppressed by an antiviral, patients can have a sudden resurgence in viral replication, leading to higher viral load and liver damage. Good luck.

    2. Hello: I believe TAF (Vemlidy, the new tenofovir formulation) is not available in Canada yet, though it should be approved for hepatitis B treatment soon (it’s already approved in Canada for HIV treatment.)
      The constant weight loss is not commonly associated with tenofovir treatment, however I encourage your father to talk to his doctor about his weight loss to see if there is a medical condition, perhaps not related to hepatitis B, that can be causing weight loss. More common side effects include some reports of bone loss and impact on kidney function.
      There is no average lifespan for people with hepatitis B. Most live long and healthy lives, and given the careful monitoring and treatment your father is receiving, there is no reason to believe that hepatitis B will shorten his life.
      Good luck.

  11. Hi HepBtalk,

    After a doctor recommends stopping the vemlidy Medication for exmple if all HepB abnormalities are undetected in the Blood as before, wht is the best cause of action to watch out for a re-occurrence and prevention of the HepB Antigen from re-emerging ?
    I also want to know how close a cure is available for HepB ? I mean a permanent cure ? I was told that even if the symptoms are undetected, it still exists in the body, but may be inactive ? kindly explain.

    Thanks

    1. Hello: Figuring out when it’s safe to discontinue an antiviral, such as Vemlidy (TAF), is not very clearcut.
      Current guidelines say it’s safe to stop antivirals after you lose the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), or if you have lost the “e” antigen (HBeAg), developed the “e” antibody and have had undetectable viral load and no signs of liver damage for up to three years.
      It is important if you stop antivirals that you are monitored every three to six months to check for any reactivation (or as you noted the re-appearance of HBeAg.
      There is no cure for hepatitis B, but experts predict a cure will be developed in the next few years.
      Good luck.

  12. Am affected with HBV since 2015 when i was detected positive my viral load was 320Ul and i was told to continue with travada by consultation by my Dr. from IDI at makerere now i completed treatment of six months again in April now am not on medication right now am i not on risk.

    secondly, am feel some pain at side of my liver is it not harmful.
    Thanks

    1. Hello: Medical guidelines recommend antiviral treatment if you have a high viral load and signs of liver damage. Your viral load, at 320 IU/mL, was actually quite low. Did you have signs of liver damage, such as elevated liver enzymes (ALT or SGPT) before you began treatment? What is it now?
      If you had no liver damage, then you probably did not need treatment and it might be OK to stop. However, please continue to be monitored at least once a year for liver damage.
      Abdominal pain is usually not common with hepatitis B, because there are very few sensory nerves around the liver. Talk to your doctor to see if some other medical condition might be contributing to your discomfort.
      Please read: http://www.hepb.org/blog/when-is-that-pain-hep-b-related-and-when-is-it-something-else/
      Good luck.

  13. Hello Doctor I was on a medicals to Canada April this years, my name is frank I was tested positive with Hbsag pos , Hbsad neg,Hbsad neg, hbead pos, hbcad pos please what is my chances am I acute or chronic please.

    1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Most healthy adults who are infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. This is called an acute infection.
      However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it is considered a chronic infection. It means you were probably infected at birth or during early childhood, when your immature immune system could not fight it.
      Knowing whether your hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. Please get tested again in six months to find out if it’s chronic or acute. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
      Good luck.

  14. Hello! update my Hbv case
    My liver discomfort getting worst,and dark urine with a small amount and sometimes fel discomfort in my bladder..my ultrasound not so bad,mild fatty liver,confirmed i have 6mm gall stones…i reall ydont know what to do,any med suggestion?or do i need to under for Ct scan? Any advice

    1. I mean undergo for Ct Scan..need ur advise of what lab test do i need to have,to identify my liver stats?

    2. Hello: Hepatitis B rarely causes abdominal pain because there are very few sensory nerves around your liver. Your pain may be resulting from the gallstones. Please see your doctor, and describe your pain. The treatment you need may be for gallstones, especially if your liver function test does not show any liver damage. In addition to your ultrasound, you should be getting your ALT/SGPT liver enzymes tested also.
      Good luck.

  15. Dear sir
    I am diagonise with hep b
    3 month befor my result

    Hbsag- reactive
    Hbeag- reactive
    Anti hbe ab- reactive
    Anti hbc igm- non reactive
    Hbv dna viral load- 10 million
    Sgpt – 555
    Sgot- 331
    And i have been in tenofovir

    After 3 month my result
    Sgpt-40
    Sgot-35
    Hbeag-reactive
    and my elastrography result
    Median-10 kpa
    IQR-3.5
    I am confusion my test result

  16. Hi I’m ruby,I was diagnosed with HEPA b reactive almost 7years ago.years passing by I didnt take any medication,but now I feel pain sometimes in my right upper abdomen.and I know its liver ache.is this indicated that I’m in worse condition?pls help me.thank you and god bless.

  17. Sir I diagnosis hep b in last month but what I am doing I am from a city in India please suggest me

    1. Hello: : When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Most healthy adults who are infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. This is called an acute infection.
      However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it is considered a chronic infection. It means you were probably infected at birth or during early childhood, when your immature immune system could not fight it.
      Knowing whether your hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. Please get tested again in six months to find out if it’s chronic or acute. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
      Keep in mind that not everyone with hepatitis B requires treatment, many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B. Generally, medical guidelines recommend treatment only if you are experiencing liver damage. This is indicated by an ultrasound and a simple blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). Our liver cells release ALT when they are damaged or die. Healthy ALT levels for men are up to 30, and for women they are up to 19. Please consult with your doctor and see what your ALT levels are to determine if you require treatment.
      If you ever do, there are two very effective antiviral medications that are recommended: tenofovir (Viread) and entecavir.
      Additionally, eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  18. Hi
    I will have Madical exam in next month in to get U.S visa but I have reactive hepatitis b positive ( ALT 31 AST 29 ) will it deny my visa i will pay for Madical exam and I don’t know about U.S Madical exam please tell my your idea. Thanks

    1. Hello: There is no cure for hepatitis B, however if someone is infected and has liver damage, they can get antiviral treatment that will reduce their viral load and risk of liver damage.
      To prevent hepatitis B, please get vaccinated, then you will have life-long protection against hepatitis B. Good luck.

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