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  • Happy NAIRHHA Day!

    Today is NAIRHHA Day! Every September 9th, the Hepatitis B Foundation brings awareness to National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Awareness Day. Founded by advocates in Massachusetts, Washington D.C., and New York, NAIRHHA Day has been observed annually on September 9th by healthcare professionals, awareness campaigns, and other organizations since 2014. The Multicultural AIDS Coalition (MAC), Hepatitis B Foundation and the Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO) are working to establish NAIRHHA day as their own federally designated awareness day. Hepatitis B and HIV in African Immigrant Communities  People of African origin are disproportionately affected by hepatitis B infection. Worldwide an estimated 292 million people are infected with chronic hepatitis B. Over 60 million people in Africa have hepatitis B which annually accounts for an estimated 68,870 deaths.1 In fact, in some African communities in the United States, between 5%-15% of people have chronic HBV infection. Unfortunately, due to the silent nature of the disease, lack of disease awareness, and limited health care access, most African community members who have hepatitis B DO NOT KNOW that they are infected. This puts them at much greater risk for premature death from cirrhosis or liver cancer. There is a high burden of HIV/HBV co-infection in African countries because both diseases share similar transmission routes such as mother-to-child, unsafe medical and injection practices, and unscreened blood transfusions.2 Chronic HIV/HBV infection is reported in up to 36% of people who are HIV positive, with the highest prevalence reported in west Africa and southern Africa. The co-infection of HIV and HBV is especially dangerous because it accelerates liver disease such as fibrosis and cirrhosis. In fact, liver-related mortality is twice as high among people with an HIV/ HBV co-infection.2  With approximately 54,000 people with HBV who immigrate to the

    https://www.hepb.org/blog/happy-nairhha-day/
  • Recap of NAIRHHA Day 2020 Celebration

            By Beatrice Zovich On Monday September 21st, a virtual celebration was held in honor of the sixth anniversary of National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV and Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day. This day, which itself is commemorated on September 9th, was created to build awareness and dismantle stigma around HIV and viral hepatitis in African immigrant and refugee communities. It takes place in September because this is the month that has been designated as National African Immigrant Month (NAIM) in the United States to celebrate the diverse and remarkable contributions African immigrants have made to enrich the United States, in spheres ranging from sports to writing to politics. The virtual celebration that occurred last Monday included a discussion of the history of NAIRHHA Day and how it came to exist in its present form, a conversation with a hepatitis B advocate who is living with the disease, discourse about the importance of NAIRHHA Day on the national level and implications for making it a federally recognized day, and trivia questions about HIV and hepatitis B. History of NAIRHHA Day: The Journey from 2014 to Present Moderator: Chioma Nnaji, MPH, MEd, Program Director, Multicultural AIDS Coalition Panelists: Augustus Woyah, Program Officer for Minority AIDS Initiative, Maryland Department of Health Amanda Lugg, Director of Advocacy and LGBTQ Programming, African Services Committee The idea for NAIRHHA Day was first conceived in 2006 at a convening of the Ethiopian Community Development Corporation in Washington, DC, at a session sponsored by Office of Minority Health about HIV in African immigrant communities. Conferences started to occur, primarily in the Northeast, although there was also interest in Atlanta and Seattle. It seemed that an opportunity had finally become available for advocates, researchers, and providers to all come together and focus on data collection, community mobilization, and policy work around HIV and

    https://www.hepb.org/blog/recap-nairhha-day-2020-celebration/
  • NAIRHHA Day 2020

    Commemorating National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV & Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day 2020 Each year in September, the Hepatitis B Foundation, along with partners around the U.S., recognizes National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV and Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day. Founded by advocates in Massachusetts, Washington D.C., and New York, NAIRHHA Day has been observed annually on September 9th by healthcare professionals, awareness campaigns, and other organizations since 2014. Although not yet nationally recognized, the Multicultural AIDS Coalition (MAC) and the Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO) are working to establish NAIRHHA day as its own federally designated awareness day. As explained by Chioma Nnaji, Director at the Multicultural AIDS Coalition’s Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program, there is a great need to establish NAIRHHA day as its own day. “Several of the current awareness days are inclusive of African immigrant communities, but do not comprehensively address their unique social factors and cultural diversity, as well as divergent histories and experiences in the US.” Why NAIRHHA Day? People born outside of the U.S. often face different health challenges than those born in the country and face various barriers to accessing important healthcare services. African immigrants (AI) are disproportionately burdened by HIV and hepatitis B. Advocates for NAIRHHA Day recognized the need to address these health issues in the community and thought that a combined awareness day would be the most effective way to reach the largest number of people impacted. Hepatitis B presents a significant public health burden for many African countries, and subsequent immigrant populations living in the United States. Although data is limited on hepatitis B infection among African immigrant (AI) and refugee communities in the U.S., studies have shown infection rates are high – between 5 and 18%1,2,3,4,5. One community

    https://www.hepb.org/blog/nairhha-day-2020/
  • The History of National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV & Hepatitis Awareness Day 2019

      Each year in September, the Hepatitis B Foundation recognizes National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV and Hepatitis Awareness Day (NAIRHHA). Founded by advocates in Massachusetts, Washington D.C., and New York, NAIRHHA Day has been observed annually on September 9th by healthcare professionals, awareness campaigns, and other organizations since 2014. Although not yet nationally recognized, the multicultural AIDS Coalition (MAC) and the Coalition Against Hepatitis B for People of African Origin (CHIPO) are working to establish NAIRHHA day as its own federally designated awareness day. As explained by Chioma Nnaji, Director at the Multicultural AIDS Coalition’s Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program, there is a great need to establish NAIRHHA day as its own day.  “Several of the current awareness days are inclusive of African immigrant communities, but do not comprehensively address their unique social factors, cultural diversity as well as divergent histories and experiences in the US.” Why NAIRHHA Day?  People born outside of the U.S. often face different health challenges than those born in the country and face various barriers to accessing important healthcare services. African immigrants (AI) are disproportionately burdened by HIV and viral hepatitis. Advocates for NAIRHHA Day recognized the need to address these health issues in the community and thought that a combined awareness day would be the most effective way to reach the largest number of people impacted.  Hepatitis B presents a significant public health burden for many African countries, and subsequent immigrant populations living in the United States. Although data is limited on hepatitis B infection among African immigrant (AI) and refugee communities in the U.S., studies have shown infection rates are high - between 5 and 18%1,2,3,4,5. One community study in Minnesota even found AIs accounting for 30% of chronic hepatitis B infections 6. AI communities are also known to be

    https://www.hepb.org/blog/history-national-african-immigrant-refugee-hiv-hepatitis-awareness-day-2019/
  • 2017 Commemoration of National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV & Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day

    On Wednesday, September 13th, the Multicultural AIDS Coalition - Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program, Hepatitis B Foundation, and Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO) commemorated NAIRHHA Day by hosting a webinar discussing “Barriers and Strategies to Addressing HIV and Hepatitis B among African Immigrants: A NAIRHHA Day Webinar.” More than 100 people participated in the webinar. The majority represented government agencies and community-based organizations. This year is particularly exciting because lead organizers also submitted a request to HIV.gov (formerly AIDS.gov) to officially recognize NAIRHHA Day on Sept. 9th as a federal HIV awareness day for African immigrants and refugees in the U.S. As discussed during the commemorating webinar, there is growing data related to the disproportionate impact of hepatitis B, as well as HIV on African immigrants in the US. African immigrants are underdiagnosed due to lower screening rates and present at a later stage of the disease compared to the general US population. Stigma is seen as the major barrier. In addition, the lack of knowledge about transmission, disease prognosis and treatment are widespread, reducing the likelihood that individuals will seek out testing and treatment services. NAIRHHA Day was launched in 2014 in an effort to address these issues. It is a joint venture organized by the Multicultural AIDS Coalition - Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program, Hepatitis B Foundation, and Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO). As explained by Chioma Nnaji, Director at the Multicultural AIDS Coalition – Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program, “Several of the current awareness days are inclusive of African immigrant communities, but do not comprehensively address their unique social factors, cultural diversity as well as divergent histories and experiences in the US.” In addition to providing an overview on HIV and HBV epidemiological

    http://www.hepb.org/blog/2017-commemoration-national-african-immigrant-refugee-hiv-hepatitis-awareness-nairhha-day/
  • Blogs

    Blogs Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: What’s the Difference?: Herbal Remedies and Supplements vs. Western Medicine Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: Reactivation with Hepatitis B: Understanding Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: CHIPO Partner Highlight: United States Coalition for African Immigrant Health Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: CHIPO Partner Highlight: Illinois Public Health Association Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: CHIPO Partner Highlight: Great Lakes Peace Centre Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: Happy NAIRHHA Day 2021! Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: CHIPO Is Looking for New Members! Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: Recap of NAIRHHA Day 2020 Celebration Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: The History of National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV & Hepatitis Awareness Day 2019 Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: Tackling Hepatitis B in Africa: The First Nigerian Hepatitis Summit Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: Hepatitis B and D Coinfection in Central Africa Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: Raising Awareness about Hepatitis B in African Immigrant Communities in the US Hepatitis B Foundation Blog: The History of National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV and Hepatitis Awareness Day 2019

    https://www.hepb.org/research-and-programs/chipo/resources/blogs/
  • Member Organizations

    African Cultural Alliance of North America (ACANA), Philadelphia The African Cultural Alliance of North America provides a wide range of services - immigration, legal, community development and health services to mainly African and Caribbean people. Learn more at www.acanaus.org l nettiejohnson@acanaus.org l 215.729.8225 African Family Health Organization (AFAHO), Philadelphia AFAHO provides health, human and educational services to African and Caribbean people and refugees in the greater Philadelphia area. Learn more at www.afaho.org l caitlin@afaho.org l 215.546.1232 African Health Coalition, Chicago Established in 2019, African Health Coalition works to address the high rates of chronic health conditions and social determinants of health in African communities. Learn more at https://www.facebook.com/Africanhealthcoalition/ l gsarumi@gmail.com l 773.396.8582 African Services Committee, New York City African Services Committee (ASC) is a non-profit human rights organization dedicated to improving the health and self-sufficiency of the African community and anyone who needs services. African Services Committee provides health, housing, legal, educational, and social services to more than 6500 newcomers each year in New York City. ASC has also worked on the frontlines of the global AIDS epidemic since 2003, operating three clinics in Ethiopia, and through advocacy and policy work in the U.S. and abroad. Learn more at www.africanservices.org | @africanservices | 212.222.3882  Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Philadelphia American Academy of Pediatrics, Pennsylvania Chapter, Media, PA Dedicated to the health and well-being of children in Pennsylvania. Learn more at www.paaap.org l smihailescu@paaap.org l 484.446.3040 American Liver Foundation ALF’s mission is to promote education, advocacy, support services, and research for the prevention, treatment and cure of liver disease. Through creativity and hard work, they provide education for liver health and prevention of liver disease to diverse populations, accelerate the pace of scientific discovery, promote quality health care, stimulate community resources and services, advocate for favorable government policies, and are the world’s best source of information about liver disease. They strive to improve quality of life while searching for cures for all people coping with these diseases. Learn more at www.liverfoundation.org l iallison@liverfoundation.org l 215.764.7060 Asian American Health Coalition/HOPE Clinic Asian Health Coalition, University of Chicago Medicine, Chicago The Asian Health Coalition, established in 1996, is a non-profit 501(c)(3) with a mission to improve the health and wellness of Asian American and other ethnic minority communities through advocacy, technical assistance, community-based education, and research. Learn more at www.asianhealth.org l alia@asianhealth.org l 773.834.6599 Association of Nigerian Physicians in the Americas, Bronx, NY The Association of Nigerian Physicians in the Americas (ANPA), was incorporated in 1995 for educational, scientific and charitable purposes as a tax-exempt non-profit organization under Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code. ANPA represents the professional interests of 4,000+ physicians, dentists and allied health professionals of Nigerian birth, ethnicity or empathy in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean. It provides a platform for medical and scientific dialogue, on issues of health within North America, the Caribbean, and Africa, pertinent to persons of descent from the Nigerian Diaspora. With the vision of a healthier Nigeria and a healthier world, a focus on health including immigrant health, primary care and chronic diseases is key. Learn more at www.anpa.org l chinyere.anyaogu@nychhc.org Bensther Development Foundation, Enugu, Nigeria Bensther Development Foundation is a non-govermental organization focused in promoting and providing evidence-based solutions to public health problems. They work with general and key populations like PWUDs/PWIDs, inmates, and young people. They are based in Enugu, Enugu State, Nigeria. Learn more at https://www.facebook.com/Bensther-Development-Foundation-674793409525430/ l benstherfoundation@gmail.com l +2348170140438 Bronx Lebanon Hospital Center Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Division of Viral Hepatitis Resources in African languages were developed to serve populations with high rates of hepatitis B. Learn more at https://www.cdc.gov/knowhepatitisb/materials-African.htm  Columbus Department of Public Health, Columbus, OH The mission of Columbus Public Health is to protect health and improve lives in their community. Learn more at https://www.columbus.gov/publichealth l oealuko@columbus.gov l 614.645.5308 Community Vision Group, Cameroon and Malawi Community Vision Group (CVG) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to a poverty-free society, where children can live to their full potential. Their vision is to help transform communities through shared responsibility. Their core program is the “Feed the Child” initiative, emerging from a deep need to meet the food security, health, nutritional, and educational needs of primary-aged children in Cameroon and Malawi. The mainstream School Feeding program is accompanied by two critical health interventions: Hepatitis B education, screening, vaccination, linkage to care, and primary eye care. Learn more at www.communityvisiongroup.org l g.miki@communityvisiongroup.org l +447453475815 Dallas/Fort Worth Hep B Free Drexel University Dornsife School of Public Health, Philadelphia Ethiopian Tewahedo Social Services (ETSS), Columbus, OH Falcons Health Foundation, Accra, Ghana Falcons Health Foundation provides urgent support, health education, general health screening, and health advocacy for people living with viral hepatitis. They provide treatment guidelines and services, and aid in prevention and awareness among individuals, groups, and large organizations. Learn more by contacting samueladdaiuhas20@gmail.com or +233540700017. Great Lakes Peace Centre, Kasese, Uganda Great Lakes Peace Centre (GLPC) comes in handy to build an enabling environment for positive peace, starting with the Rwenzori region and growing to the entire Great Lakes region. GLPC develops programs and projects that are aimed at equipping the youth and women in the area with relevant life skills, growing their capacity, and advocating for platforms where they can ably share their demands and challenges so that their voices are heard. The aims and objectives of the GLPC are: a. To support HIV/AIDs-affected families, orphans and vulnerable children and grandmothers; b. Economic empowerment and capacity-building of youth and their communities; c. Promoting good health and well-being, and fighting gender-based violence and other social evils; d. Fostering international understanding and peace-building through trainings and use of international peace figures to change mindsets of youth and women; e. Supporting the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals in the region through working with community youth groups and other groups in collaboration with international agencies. Health promotion and disease prevention are strategic objectives of the organization with a focus on communicable and non-communicable diseases, such as hepatitis B, HIV/AIDS and many viral infections, bearing in mind that the biggest challenge in tropical Africa is adoption to modern health practices and universal health coverage. Learn more at http://www.greatlakespeace.org/ l bwambalearafat@yahoo.com l +256779501921 Hep Free NYC Network - CHIPO NYC Committee Hep Free NYC's goal is to bring together NYC organizations, service providers and advocates who are dedicated to ending hepatitis B and C in African communities throughout the city. View their CHIPO-NYC Committee webpage on hepfree.nyc or email them at news@hepfree.nyc. HEP Initiative, Lusaka, Zambia HEP Initiative Zambia is a not-for-profit organization established in 2019, that specifically deals with hepatitis in Zambia by engaging Ministry of Health and other stakeholders to fight, control and prevent viral hepatitis.They engage in activities such as information, experience and medical advice sharing, and health promotion. They raise awareness of viral hepatitis, its prevention, diagnosis and treatment. They have created a platform for patients with viral hepatitis to share their experiences with the public to fight stigma and discrimination. Learn more at https://www.facebook.com/Hepinitiative/ l kennedychiso@gmail.com l +260950449019 Hepatitis Alliance of Ghana, Accra, Ghana Hepatitis Alliance of Ghana (HAG) is a non-governmental organization (NGO) established and incorporated on October 31, 2016 by the Registrar General Department of Ghana. Their network comprises over 500 healthcare providers in Ghana. These professionals include physicians, nurses, midwives, physician assistants, biomedical scientists, and public health specialists. In addition, about 900 patients with hepatitis B and C are in their network. HAG provides a comprehensive range of viral hepatitis services including awareness creation, capacity building of healthcare providers, patient support services, advocacy, and hepatitis-related research. Learn more here. l hepagh1@gmail.com l +233244712071 Hepatitis B Coalition of Washington, Seattle Hepatitis B Foundation The Hepatitis B Foundation is a national nonprofit organization dedicated to finding a cure and improving the quality of life for those affected by hepatitis B worldwide. Their commitment includes funding focused research, promoting disease awareness, supporting immunization and treatment initiatives, and serving as the primary source of information for patients and their families, the medical and scientific community, and the general public. Learn more at www.hepb.org l beatrice.zovich@hepb.org l 215.489.4900 Hepatitis B Initiative of Washington, D.C. (HBI‐DC) Founded in 2006 as the Hepatitis B Initiative of Washington DC, HBI is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to mobilize communities to address health disparities, including preventing infectious diseases and liver cancer (by detecting HBV and HCV infections early) that affect vulnerable populations. Through collaborative partnerships, the organization provides culturally and linguistically appropriate outreach, education, screening, testing, vaccination, linkage to care, and patient navigation services for impacted communities to promote immigrant health equity. Learn more at https://hbi-dc.org/ l sandraashford@hbi-dc.org l 571.274.0021 Hepatitis Education Project, Seattle The Hepatitis Education Project offers free hepatitis B and C screening, free hepatitis A and B vaccines, medical case management for people diagnosed with hepatitis C, and harm reduction services, including a syringe service program, naloxone, and a suboxone clinic. Learn more at https://hepeducation.org/ l angelica@hepeducation.org l 206.732.0311 Horn of Africa Rescue Committee Houston Department of Health and Human Services Illinois Public Health Association, Springfield, IL The Illinois Public Health Association is the oldest and largest public health association in the state of Illinois. As one of the largest affiliates of the American Public Health Association, IPHA is widely recognized as a leader in the field of public health advocacy, health education and promotion. Learn more at https://www.ipha.com/#gsc.tab=0 l tsmith@ipha.com l 618.406.9415 International Community Health Services, Seattle Jeneso Development Initiative, Yola, Adamawa, Nigeria Jeneso Development Initiative is passionate about sensitization, screening, vaccination and treatment for hepatitis. To learn more, contact semenice0022@gmail.com l 08160587065 Maine Immigrant Access Health Network Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, MN Midwest Asian Health Association, Chicago and Aurora, IL Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL Minnesota Department of Health Montefiore Einstein Starfish Program, Bronx, NY Montefiore Medical Center is a premier academic medical center and the primary teaching hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, New York City. Its main campus, the Henry and Lucy Moses Division, is located in the Norwood section of the northern Bronx. The Starfish Program provides care in the liver clinic, such as testing for HBV and blood pressure, and linkage to care for vulnerable communities. Learn more at www.montefiore.org l alabaran@montefiore.org l 347-899-5446 Mount Sinai Medical Center/Project HONE, New York City Hepatitis Outreach Network (HONE) is a community viral hepatitis prevention, screening and linkage to care study focused on adult minority groups in New York City who are at risk for chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). HONE offers combined HBV and HCV screening at no cost at a variety of health fairs and other events throughout New York City. Learn more here or by contacting lovely.joseph@icahn.mssm.edu or 929.544.5198. Multicultural AIDS Coalition/Africans for Improved Access, Boston The organization's efforts focus on ensuring high quality, accessible HIV/STI prevention, care, and treatment services. Its mission also includes accessing vital services and research projects for African people living in the Greater Boston area. Learn more at www.mac-boston.org l aadigwe@mac-boston.org l 978.328.6017 National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day is celebrated annually on September 9th. Founded by advocates in Massachusetts, Washington D.C., and New York, NAIRHHA Day has been observed annually on September 9th by communities, advocates, healthcare professionals, government officials and other stakeholders since 2014. It takes place in September because this is the month that has been designated as National African Immigrant Month (NAIM) in the United States to celebrate the diverse and remarkable contributions African immigrants have made to enrich the United States, in spheres ranging from sports to writing to politics. Learn more at www.nairhhaday.org l contactus@nairhhaday.org National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD), Washington, DC NASTAD is a leading non-partisan non-profit association that represents public health officials who administer HIV and hepatitis programs in the U.S. They work to advance the health and dignity of people living with and impacted by HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis, and intersecting epidemics by strengthening governmental public health through advocacy, capacity building, and social justice. Learn more at www.nastad.org l bntiri-reid@nastad.org National Organization for People Living with Hepatitis B, Kampala, Uganda The National Organization for People Living with Hepatitis B (NOPLHB) is an NGO and a registered, pioneer, non-public actor in hepatitis response in Uganda. It provides comprehensive hepatitis services, and advocacy for the rights of patients, improvement of diagnostic and clinical services, and creating awareness about the disease. NOPLHB is a member of the World Hepatitis Alliance and International Alliance of Patient Organizations (IAPO), and an associate member of the Coalition to Eradicate Viral Hepatitis in Asia Pacific (CEVHAP). NOPLHB stands out as the first and largest Non-Governmental Organization in Uganda, providing the most comprehensive hepatitis knowledge on prevention, care and support services. Learn more at www.noplhb.org l kkabagambe@noplhb.org l +256702230051 National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, Washington, DC NVHR is a coalition of patients, health care providers, community-based organizations, and public health partners fighting for an equitable world free of viral hepatitis. Learn more at www.nvhr.org l adrienne@nvhr.org New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Viral Hepatitis Program Hepatitis B and C navigation services, clinical practice transformation, surveillance registry and more. Visit their hepatitis webpage at https://nyc.gov/health/hepatitis or email us hep@health.nyc.gov. New York City Hepatitis B Coalition - Hep Free NYC Network Founded in 2009, NYC Hep B Coalition and Hep Free NYC Network convenes NYC hep B-focused stakeholders to prevent and manage hep B in NYC. Visit the NYC Hep B Coalition webpage at hepfree.nyc. Contact us at https://hepfree.nyc/contact-us/ or email news@hepfree.nyc.  New York University School of Medicine Obala Foundation, Taunton, MA Ohio Asian American Health Coalition, Columbus, OH ONG-ADILO, Yorosso, Mali ADILO is a non-governmental organization under Malian law created on November 28th, 2018. Its goal is to contribute to the socio-economic development of the community through the implementation of local actions. The NGO-ADILO provides technical support to local and national initiatives in the following areas: Awareness raising, information, advocacy/lobbying, training, and project evaluation. Learn more at https://www.facebook.com/www.adilo.co/ l amadounta@gmail.com l +22374003756 l +224627355169 Organization for Medical Outreach to Communities, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania The Organization for Medical Outreach to Communities (OMOC) is a non-governmental, non-profit organization with a purpose to save poor people who are not able to incur costs (charges) for their health when they are sick. OMOC does this because they know that the community is vulnerable and facing a lot of challenges associated with health and health education. OMOC does medical outreach to end hepatitis, non-communicable diseases, and Sefe representative health. To learn more, contact shaibuissa60@gmail.com l +255659114754 PA Immunization Coalition, Media, PA The Pennsylvania Immunization Coalition (PAIC) is an organization of volunteers consisting of individuals and organizations that have an interest in advancing the mission of timely and effective immunizations for all Pennsylvania residents. Mission: To promote timely and effective immunizations for all Pennsylvania residents across their life span. Vision: The PAIC is a diverse group of passionate, energetic, and committed partners working together to ensure that no one in Pennsylvania suffers from vaccine-preventable illnesses. PAIC believes this can be achieved through focusing efforts on education, advocacy, and access. Learn more at www.immunizepa.org l smihailescu@paaap.org l 484.446.3040 Partnerships for Health, Augusta, ME Philadelphia Department of Public Health (PDPH) The viral hepatitis program at PDPH provides surveillance for hepatitis B and C. Learn more at www.phillyhepatitis.com l melissa.hobkirk@phila.gov l 717.644.2741 Philadelphia Department of Public Health - Immunization Program The Philadelphia Immunization Program keeps Philadelphia healthy by averting vaccine-preventable diseases and increasing immunization coverage across the city. As part of the Philadelphia Department of Public Health Division of Disease Control, the program is federally funded to oversee the government purchase and local distribution of vaccines. By monitoring the use of these vaccines, it helps providers maintain their vaccination inventory. Learn more at https://vax.phila.gov/ l kenya.mack@phila.gov l 215.792.3254 Rise Against Hepatitis Global Initiative, Nigeria Rise Against Hepatitis Global Initiative (RAHGI) is a non-profit organization that works to prevent liver cancer caused by hepatitis among people around the globe by employing the strategy of awareness and sensitization, testing, vaccination and treatment. RAHGI was created to combat the rejection and discrimination of people living with hepatitis, the ignorance of the existence of the virus, level of transference and its silent destruction of life. To learn more, contact riseagainsthepatitis.gi22@gmail.com l 08136660683 Somali Family Safety Task Force, Seattle The Somali Family Safety Task Force is a nonprofit community-based organization (CBO) located in the NewHolly neighborhood in Seattle, WA that serves refugee and immigrant women and their families. The Somali Family Safety Task Force is not only is  community-based, but also community-driven. The founders, as well as the majority of the staff and volunteers are Somali and East African. The programs are created with input from the community, often at their request. Programs range from computer literacy training to combating and preventing gender-based-violence. The Somali Family Safety Task Force takes pride in being an organization by and for the community. Learn more at www.somalifamilysafetytaskforce.org l farhiya@sfstf.org l 206.659.4755 St. Catherine University Public Health Department, St. Paul, MN https://www.stkate.edu/academics/hssh/public-health-department l lmunala@stkate.edu l 651.690.6265 United States Coalition for African Immigrant Health (USCAIH), Maryland The United States Coalition for African Immigrant Health (USCAIH) began as the National African Immigrant Project (NAIP) in 2005 under the auspices of the U.S. Office of Minority Health. USCAIH was originally established to provide a platform for national and regional conferences on African immigrant health. Each of these conferences successfully attracted state and federal agencies, clinicians, academics, students and other stakeholders working with the African Immigrant (AI) population. In 2021, USCAIH further expanded its mission by establishing itself as a coalition in order to provide a broader platform for engaging stakeholders interested in the African diaspora. Learn more at https://www.uscaih.org/ l uscaih@uscaih.org University of Maryland School of Medicine

    https://www.hepb.org/research-and-programs/chipo/member-organizations/
  • Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO)

    The Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO) is a community coalition co-founded and led by the Hepatitis B Foundation. We are comprised of organizations and individuals interested in addressing the high rates of hepatitis B infection among African communities around the world. CHIPO serves as a forum for sharing information and best practices, and improving national capacity to improve hepatitis B awareness, testing, vaccination and treatment among highly affected African communities. People of African origin are disproportionately affected by hepatitis B infection. In fact, in some African communities in the U.S., between 5% and 15% of people have chronic HBV infection. Unfortunately, due to the silent nature of the disease, lack of disease awareness, and limited health care access, most African community members who have hepatitis B DO NOT KNOW that they are infected. This puts them at much greater risk for premature death from cirrhosis or liver cancer. The key to addressing the high burden of hepatitis B infection in people of African origin is to improve awareness and access to hepatitis B information, screening, vaccination, and follow-up care. CHIPO brings together people from around the world who are working in their own local communities to address these very issues.   Join CHIPO! Does your organization serve African populations in the U.S., or are you a passionate community member? All are welcome at CHIPO's coalition calls! Our next call will take place on Monday, March 20th, 2023 at 3pm Eastern Time. More information coming soon. Email beatrice.zovich@hepb.org if you have questions or are interested in joining!  Listen to a new podcast: Spotlight on Stigma Join us for a podcast in which researchers from the Hepatitis B Foundation in the United States and the University of New South Wales in Australia come together to discuss the profound impacts stigma can have on the lives of people living with hepatitis B. Click here to listen! News and Updates Check out our blog post, which provides an overview of CHIPO's goals and objectives, where we've been and where we're going. We hope you join us! [embed width="335" height="251" class="leftAlone" thumbnail="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/oXSEaQANvVE/hqdefault.jpg?r"]http://youtu.be/oXSEaQANvVE[/embed] Check out a recent webinar collaboration between CHIPO & Hep B United: Addressing Myths & Misconceptions about Hepatitis B among African Immigrant Communities around the United States. There are many myths surrounding various aspects of hepatitis B, including its prevalence, transmission, prevention, testing, severity, and treatment. This webinar explores some of the most widespread misconceptions, particularly in African communities around the United States, from a variety of perspectives, including those of healthcare providers and a community health practitioner. Watch to learn more! Recent Nature Communications article (January 2023): Systematic review and individual-patient-data meta-analysis of non-invasive fibrosis markers for chronic hepatitis B in Africa Recent Mirage article (January 2023): Simpler Tests Needed for Africa’s Chronic Hep B Patients Recent Journal of Gastroenterology article (September 2022): Prevalence and Predictors of Viral Hepatitis D Co-Infection in Chronic HbsAg Carriers View our Publication! Barriers to Hepatitis B Screening and Prevention for African Immigrant Populations in the United States: A Qualitative Study (2020) Exciting news about National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV/AIDS & Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day!: Reps. Johnson, Meng, and Lee Push to Recognize Sept. 9th as National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day From our Partners The November 2022 CHIPO coalition call featured a presentation by Dr. Yasmin Ibrahim of the Hepatitis B Foundation, who presented her recent paper entitled Attitudes towards clinical trial participation among people living with chronic hepatitis B. You can view Dr. Ibrahim's slides here. Check out a new podcast from our partners at the United States Coalition for African Immigrant Health, all about hepatitis B in African communities, and featuring two of our new #justB storytellers! In July of 2022, the CHIPO coalition call focused on stigma and discrimination surrounding hepatitis B in African communities and included presentations from Mohamed Ali, a Public Health Manager for Seattle and King County, Washington and Cait O'Donnell, Manager of Health and Social Programs at African Family Health Organization (AFAHO) in Philadelphia. You can view Mohamed's slides here and Cait's slides here. CHIPO's May 2022 coalition call featured an overview of the fundamentals of grant-writing. View slides from this presentation here.  At our March 2022 meeting, we hosted Dr. Yvonne Nartey of the Cape Coast Teaching Hospital in Ghana and Mr. Kenneth Kabagambe, Founder and Executive Director of the National Organization for People Living with Hepatitis B in Uganda. Both discussed the great hepatitis B and C advocacy efforts they are undertaking in their respective countries. You can view Dr. Nartey's slides here.  On our February 2022 coalition call, we were pleased to host Fatima Omarufilo, Program Coordinator and Patient Navigator at the Starfish Program at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, NY, who presented the work that she and her colleagues had done on their paper about breaking down barriers for hepatitis B screening in the Bronx West African community through education in collaboration with faith-based organizations. You can view Fatima's slides here.  Montefiore Einstein Starfish Project is offering FREE hepatitis B testing for West Africans in the Bronx, NYC. Click here for more details. The Starfish Program has hepatitis B fact sheets available for West African communities that can be found in English, Twi, Hausa, French, and Igbo. African Services Committee in New York City created a flyer in both English and French about understanding your hepatitis B test results. View this resource here. From our Blog CHIPO Partner Highlight: United States Coalition for African Immigrant Health CHIPO Partner Highlight: Illinois Public Health Association CHIPO Partner Highlight: Great Lakes Peace Centre Happy NAIRHHA Day 2021! Tackling Hepatitis B in Africa: The First Nigerian Hepatitis Summit Where is Hepatitis Delta? High Prevalence of Hepatitis B/Delta Coinfection in Central Africa Raising Awareness about Hepatitis B in African Immigrant Communities in the US CHIPO Call Minutes January 2023 November 2022 July 2022 May 2022 March 2022 February 2022 December 2021 November 2021 July 2021 January 2021 November 2020 July 2020 May 2020 January 2020  Social Media       

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