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  • Recap of NAIRHHA Day 2020 Celebration

            By Beatrice Zovich On Monday September 21st, a virtual celebration was held in honor of the sixth anniversary of National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV and Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day. This day, which itself is commemorated on September 9th, was created to build awareness and dismantle stigma around HIV and viral hepatitis in African immigrant and refugee communities. It takes place in September because this is the month that has been designated as National African Immigrant Month (NAIM) in the United States to celebrate the diverse and remarkable contributions African immigrants have made to enrich the United States, in spheres ranging from sports to writing to politics. The virtual celebration that occurred last Monday included a discussion of the history of NAIRHHA Day and how it came to exist in its present form, a conversation with a hepatitis B advocate who is living with the disease, discourse about the importance of NAIRHHA Day on the national level and implications for making it a federally recognized day, and trivia questions about HIV and hepatitis B. History of NAIRHHA Day: The Journey from 2014 to Present Moderator: Chioma Nnaji, MPH, MEd, Program Director, Multicultural AIDS Coalition Panelists: Augustus Woyah, Program Officer for Minority AIDS Initiative, Maryland Department of Health Amanda Lugg, Director of Advocacy and LGBTQ Programming, African Services Committee The idea for NAIRHHA Day was first conceived in 2006 at a convening of the Ethiopian Community Development Corporation in Washington, DC, at a session sponsored by Office of Minority Health about HIV in African immigrant communities. Conferences started to occur, primarily in the Northeast, although there was also interest in Atlanta and Seattle. It seemed that an opportunity had finally become available for advocates, researchers, and providers to all come together and focus on data collection, community mobilization, and policy work around HIV and

    https://www.hepb.org/blog/recap-nairhha-day-2020-celebration/
  • NAIRHHA Day 2020

    Commemorating National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV & Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day 2020 Each year in September, the Hepatitis B Foundation, along with partners around the U.S., recognizes National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV and Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day. Founded by advocates in Massachusetts, Washington D.C., and New York, NAIRHHA Day has been observed annually on September 9th by healthcare professionals, awareness campaigns, and other organizations since 2014. Although not yet nationally recognized, the Multicultural AIDS Coalition (MAC) and the Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO) are working to establish NAIRHHA day as its own federally designated awareness day. As explained by Chioma Nnaji, Director at the Multicultural AIDS Coalition’s Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program, there is a great need to establish NAIRHHA day as its own day. “Several of the current awareness days are inclusive of African immigrant communities, but do not comprehensively address their unique social factors and cultural diversity, as well as divergent histories and experiences in the US.” Why NAIRHHA Day? People born outside of the U.S. often face different health challenges than those born in the country and face various barriers to accessing important healthcare services. African immigrants (AI) are disproportionately burdened by HIV and hepatitis B. Advocates for NAIRHHA Day recognized the need to address these health issues in the community and thought that a combined awareness day would be the most effective way to reach the largest number of people impacted. Hepatitis B presents a significant public health burden for many African countries, and subsequent immigrant populations living in the United States. Although data is limited on hepatitis B infection among African immigrant (AI) and refugee communities in the U.S., studies have shown infection rates are high – between 5 and 18%1,2,3,4,5. One community

    https://www.hepb.org/blog/nairhha-day-2020/
  • The History of National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV & Hepatitis Awareness Day 2019

      Each year in September, the Hepatitis B Foundation recognizes National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV and Hepatitis Awareness Day (NAIRHHA). Founded by advocates in Massachusetts, Washington D.C., and New York, NAIRHHA Day has been observed annually on September 9th by healthcare professionals, awareness campaigns, and other organizations since 2014. Although not yet nationally recognized, the multicultural AIDS Coalition (MAC) and the Coalition Against Hepatitis B for People of African Origin (CHIPO) are working to establish NAIRHHA day as its own federally designated awareness day. As explained by Chioma Nnaji, Director at the Multicultural AIDS Coalition’s Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program, there is a great need to establish NAIRHHA day as its own day.  “Several of the current awareness days are inclusive of African immigrant communities, but do not comprehensively address their unique social factors, cultural diversity as well as divergent histories and experiences in the US.” Why NAIRHHA Day?  People born outside of the U.S. often face different health challenges than those born in the country and face various barriers to accessing important healthcare services. African immigrants (AI) are disproportionately burdened by HIV and viral hepatitis. Advocates for NAIRHHA Day recognized the need to address these health issues in the community and thought that a combined awareness day would be the most effective way to reach the largest number of people impacted.  Hepatitis B presents a significant public health burden for many African countries, and subsequent immigrant populations living in the United States. Although data is limited on hepatitis B infection among African immigrant (AI) and refugee communities in the U.S., studies have shown infection rates are high - between 5 and 18%1,2,3,4,5. One community study in Minnesota even found AIs accounting for 30% of chronic hepatitis B infections 6. AI communities are also known to be

    https://www.hepb.org/blog/history-national-african-immigrant-refugee-hiv-hepatitis-awareness-day-2019/
  • Join us for a Twitter Chat for Liver Cancer Awareness Month!

    … cancer? Co-hosts and featured partners of the chat include: Hepatitis B Foundation - @hepbfoundation NASTAD - @NASTAD CDC Division of Viral Hepatitis - @cdchep Prevent Cancer Foundation - @preventcancer Hep B United Philadelphia - @hepbunitedphila Iowa Harm Reduction Coalition - @IAHarmReduction CDCNPIN will be moderating the chat - @cdcnpin Confirmed participants and their handles include: Hep B United  – @hepbunited Coalition Against Hepatitis For People of African Origin – @CHIPO_HBV Liver Cancer Connect - @livercancerconn CDC’s Division of Cancer Prevention and Control - @CDC_Cancer Hep Free Hawaii - @HepFreeHawaii HBI-DC - @HBIDC HepFreeNYC - @hepfreenyc NAIRHHA Day - @NAIRHHADAY Minnesota Department of Health - @mnhealth Philly Hep C Coalition - @hep_CAP Just getting started with Twitter? Do you wish to join the conversation but you don’t know how?  Type #Liverchat in the search box of the Twitter application to follow the chat, and click on "Latest".   You can prepare your tweets in response to the topics listed above in advance, or you can also tweet on the fly, re-tweet, or Like a tweet during the chat. The questions are labeled Q1, Q2, etc. so please respond/answer specific question by using A1, A2, etc. in front of your tweets. Remember to include the #Liverchat hashtag, which is not case sensitive, in all of your tweets. If you plan to participate, please contact us at info@hepb.org and we'll add you to the list of confirmed participants. Let us know if you have any other questions about joining the chat. We’re here to help!      

    http://www.hepb.org/blog/thinkaboutthelink-hepatitis-liver-cancer-join-us-twitter-chat/
  • 2017 Commemoration of National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV & Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day

    On Wednesday, September 13th, the Multicultural AIDS Coalition - Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program, Hepatitis B Foundation, and Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO) commemorated NAIRHHA Day by hosting a webinar discussing “Barriers and Strategies to Addressing HIV and Hepatitis B among African Immigrants: A NAIRHHA Day Webinar.” More than 100 people participated in the webinar. The majority represented government agencies and community-based organizations. This year is particularly exciting because lead organizers also submitted a request to HIV.gov (formerly AIDS.gov) to officially recognize NAIRHHA Day on Sept. 9th as a federal HIV awareness day for African immigrants and refugees in the U.S. As discussed during the commemorating webinar, there is growing data related to the disproportionate impact of hepatitis B, as well as HIV on African immigrants in the US. African immigrants are underdiagnosed due to lower screening rates and present at a later stage of the disease compared to the general US population. Stigma is seen as the major barrier. In addition, the lack of knowledge about transmission, disease prognosis and treatment are widespread, reducing the likelihood that individuals will seek out testing and treatment services. NAIRHHA Day was launched in 2014 in an effort to address these issues. It is a joint venture organized by the Multicultural AIDS Coalition - Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program, Hepatitis B Foundation, and Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO). As explained by Chioma Nnaji, Director at the Multicultural AIDS Coalition – Africans For Improved Access (AFIA) program, “Several of the current awareness days are inclusive of African immigrant communities, but do not comprehensively address their unique social factors, cultural diversity as well as divergent histories and experiences in the US.” In addition to providing an overview on HIV and HBV epidemiological

    http://www.hepb.org/blog/2017-commemoration-national-african-immigrant-refugee-hiv-hepatitis-awareness-nairhha-day/
  • Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO)

    The Coalition Against Hepatitis for People of African Origin (CHIPO) is a national community coalition co-founded and led by the Hepatitis B Foundation. We are comprised of organizations and individuals interested in addressing the high rates of hepatitis B infection among African communities in the U.S. CHIPO serves as a forum for sharing information and best practices, and improving national capacity to improve hepatitis B awareness, testing, vaccination and treatment among highly affected African communities. People of African origin are disproportionately affected by hepatitis B infection. In fact, in some African communities in the U.S., between 5%-15% of people have chronic HBV infection. Unfortunately, due to the silent nature of the disease, lack of disease awareness, and limited health care access, most African community members who have hepatitis B DO NOT KNOW that they are infected. This puts them at much greater risk for premature death from cirrhosis or liver cancer. The key to addressing the high burden of hepatitis B infection in people of African origin is to improve awareness and access to hepatitis B information, screening, vaccination, and follow-up care. CHIPO brings together people around the country who are working in their own local communities to address these very issues.   Join CHIPO! Does your organization serve African immigrant populations in the U.S., or are you a passionate community member? All are welcome! Join us for our next bi-monthly CHIPO coalition call:  Monday, January 25, 2021, 3-4pm, EDT Link to Join: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82508066108?pwd=cTlZazJBOUdkQXUwU0J5U2pNZVpiZz09 Meeting ID: 825 0806 6108Passcode: 993868 Dial by your location +1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago) +1 646 558 8656 US (New York) +1 301 715 8592 US (Washington D.C) +1 346 248 7799 US (Houston) +1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose) +1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)  Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kc9X5F63Hs News and Updates Check out our latest blog post, describing the virtual celebration of National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV and Hepatitis Awareness (NAIRHHA) Day 2020!  Recent Lancet article: Converging Pandemics: Implications of COVID-19 for the Viral Hepatitis Response in Sub-Saharan Africa. Major Article Published in Nature on Hepatitis B in Africa: The silent epidemic killing more people than HIV, malaria or TB     View our New Publication! Barriers to Hepatitis B Screening and Prevention for African Immigrant Populations in the United States: A Qualitative Study (2020)  From our Partners Montefiore Einstein Starfish Project is offering FREE hepatitis B testing for West Africans in the Bronx, NYC. Click here for more details.  African Services Committee in New York City recently delivered a presentation on Project DELIVER: Decreasing and Eliminating Liver Cancer by Increasing Viral Hepatitis Testing & Educational Resources. Click here to view the presentation.  Read about a new initiative of the Barcelona Institute for Global Health to improve linkage to HBV care for West African migrants in the Barcelona metro area, a project known as HBV-COMSAVA. View the presentation here.  From our Blog The History of National African Immigrant and Refugee HIV & Hepatitis Awareness Day 2019 Tackling Hepatitis B in Africa: The First Nigerian Hepatitis Summit Where is Hepatitis Delta? High Prevalence of Hepatitis B/Delta Coinfection in Central Africa Raising Awareness about Hepatitis B in African Immigrant Communities in the US CHIPO Call Minutes January 2020  May 2020 July 2020 November 2020 Social Media

    https://www.hepb.org/research-and-programs/chipo/