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A Capitol Celebration: US Leaders in Hepatitis B Celebrate World Hepatitis Day

Hep B United (HBU), a coalition established by the Hepatitis B Foundation (HBF) and the Association of Asian Pacific Community Health Organizations (AAPCHO), held its fifth annual Hep B United Summit from July 26th to 28th in Washington D.C. The summit was held to promote screening and prevention strategies and advocate for a cure to further HBU’s mission to eliminate hepatitis B in the United States.

The summit is the largest gathering of hepatitis B leaders from around the country including public health agencies, national non-profit organizations, community coalitions, and individuals and family members affected by hep B. Catherine Freeland, MPH, Public Health Manager of HBF, said, “The summit is like a family reunion.” It’s an opportunity for HBU members to convene, share best strategies, and celebrate their wins over the past five years. The partnerships within HBU ensures that best practices and resources are shared as well. “Once we have a cure, we are committed to making sure chronically infected Americans get it,” Chari Cohen, DrPH, MPH, co-chair of HBU mentioned during the summit. Over the past year, HBU screened 22,556, educated 52,194, and reached over 6 million people with in-language hepatitis B messaging! That’s a win for sure!

As a part of the summit, HBU partners visited Capitol Hill to discuss with federal legislators the need to support hepatitis B and liver cancer research, education, screening, and treatment programs. A Congressional reception was also held to highlight the “#justB: Real People Sharing their Stories of Hepatitis B” storytelling campaign, which increases awareness of hepatitis B through personal stories. There were also meeting sessions focusing on capacity building, sustaining local hepatitis B coalitions, and best ways to utilize resources like the “Know Hepatitis B” campaign from the CDC and Hep B United and the #justB campaign. The Hep B United Summit is a way to celebrate World Hepatitis Day, which is on July 28th every year. Partners celebrated and raised awareness for World Hepatitis Day around Capitol Hill with a scavenger hunt!

At the Summit, HBU and its CDC partners presented five community leaders with the 2017 Hep B Champion Awards in recognition of their outstanding commitment to eliminating hepatitis B and liver cancer in their communities:

 Cathy Phan, the Health Initiatives Project Manager at HOPE Clinic in Houston, Texas, is recognized for her dedication to reducing health disparities, advocating for access to health care and health equity for underserved populations. Cathy brings unique perspectives, best practices and creative, innovative ideas from the local community clinics to the national level.

Vivian Huang, MD, MPH, the Director of Adult Immunization and Emergency Preparedness for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and the medical director for the NYC Department of Health Immunization Clinic is recognized for her commitment to reducing the burden of vaccine-preventable diseases locally and globally including hepatitis B and liver cancer. Dr. Huang is a strong, tireless advocate for hepatitis B prevention, education, and treatment and health equity through health department engagement.

Hong Liu, PhD, the Executive Director of the Midwest Asian Health Association in Chicago, Illinois, is recognized for her innovative approaches to educating the public on hepatitis B and her willingness to share her best practices and experiences with others working in the field. This year, Dr. Liu’s leadership has led her organization to educating over 1,337 individuals in Chicago’s Chinatown district and screening close to 300 individuals for hepatitis B.

Dan-Tam Phan-Hoang, MSc., is program manager of HBI-Minnesota, a Minneapolis, Minnesota-based non-profit that she helped start in 2015. Dan-Tam is recognized for her leadership in Minneapolis, building strong collaborations with community leaders, healthcare providers, funders, and government agencies to address hepatitis B throughout the state and successfully establishing a hepatitis B outreach and prevention program for high-risk communities in the Twin Cities.

The National Task Force on Hepatitis B for AAPI, is a national organization that brings together scientists, health professionals, non-profit organizations, and concerned citizens in a concerted effort to eliminate the transmission of hepatitis B and to decrease health disparities among those chronically infected. The Task Force is recognized for increasing physicians’ awareness about hepatitis B and launching a new health care provider program, bringing together public health and health care professionals in regional meetings around the country. The Health Education for Liver Providers (H.E.L.P.) Training Program is designed to provide health care providers and their medical team core medical knowledge of hepatitis B and hepatitis C.

Read the summit press release here.

More pictures of the summit can be found on HBU’s Facebook album, Storify, and e-newsletter.

To read about the Hep B United 2016 Summit from last year, click here.

Join the Conversation at the Hep B United Summit; Watch Summit Sessions On Facebook Live!

Summit Image FB Insta (1)The annual Hep B United Summit, organized by the Hepatitis B Foundation, convenes in Washington D.C. from Thursday, July 27 through Friday, July 28. National and local coalition partners, experts, stakeholders, and federal partners will meet to discuss how to increase hepatitis B testing and vaccination and improve access to care and treatment for individuals living with hepatitis B.

You can watch many of these important sessions on Facebook Live. You can also follow the conversation at the Summit on Twitter with #Hepbunite!

Facebook Live is live video streaming available to all Pages and profiles on Facebook. Check out the agenda below and go to the HepBUnited Facebook Page to view the live broadcast. The session will be made available following the broadcast for those who are not able to join us live.

Here are the details on the sessions that will be broadcast on Facebook Live:

Day 1 – Thursday July 27:

8:30 – 10:00 AM:  Welcome and Introductions
Tim Block, PhD, President & Co-founder, Hepatitis B Foundation and Baruch S. Blumberg Institute, Chari Cohen DrPH, MPH, Co-Chair, Hep B United and Director of Public Health, Hepatitis B Foundation, Jeff Caballero, MPH, Co-Chair, Hep B United and Executive Director, AAPCHO

10:00 – 10:30 AM:  Time to Eliminate Hepatitis B
Dr. John Ward, Director, CDC Division of Viral Hepatitis 

10:30 -11:15 AM:  #justB Storytelling Campaign Panel: Real People Sharing their Stories of Hepatitis B
Rhea Racho, MPP, Public Health Program and Policy Coordinator, Hepatitis B Foundation and storytellers

11:15 – 12:00 PM: Know Hepatitis B Campaign Updates
Cynthia Jorgenson, DrPH, Team Lead and Sherry Chen, MPH, Health Scientist, Division of Viral Hepatitis, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

12:00 – 12:30 PM:  Increasing Community Awareness and Education
Moderator: Catherine Freeland, MPH, Hepatitis B Foundation and Sherry Chen, CDC

3:00 PM – 4:15 PM:  Breakout Session: Increasing Awareness through Media Engagement
Facilitators: Jessie MacDonald, Vice President, Weber Shandwick and Lisa Thong, Account Supervisor, IW Group

4:15 PM – 5:00 PM:  State of Hep B United
National Advisory Committee
–  Strengthening Coalition Partnerships: Sharing Resources and
–  Overcoming Challenges
Kate Moraras, MPH, Director, Hep B United and Sr. Program Director, Hepatitis B Foundation and Catherine Freeland, MPH, Public Health Program Manager, Hepatitis B Foundation

 Day 2 – Friday July 28

11:30 AM:   Hepatitis B CME Provider Education Program
Amy Trang, PhD, Administrator, National Task Force on Hepatitis B
Focus on Asian Pacific Islander Americans

12:45 PM – 1:45 PM:  HBU Mini-Grantee Presentations
Moderator: Catherine Freeland, MPH, Public Health Program Manager, Hepatitis B Foundation

Not able to join the sessions with Facebook Live? Follow the conversation on Twitter using the #Hepbunite hashtag. Follow the events, Retweet and engage with event attendees and help us raise hepatitis B awareness in the U.S. and around the globe.

World Hepatitis Day is July 28th, and this Summit is a terrific opportunity to share with the world what we’re doing to help those living with hepatitis B in our communities. Other popular hashtags for World Hepatitis Day, and to raise hepatitis B awareness, include: #NOhep, #KnowHepB, #WorldHepatitisDay, #WorldHepDay, #WHD2017, #hepatitis, #hepatitisB, #HBV, #hepB, #justB. Connect with, follow and engage with fellow partners on twitter to keep the hep B conversation going during the Hep B United Summit and World Hepatitis Day events, and beyond.

Check out: @AAPCHOtweets, @AAHC_HOPEclinic, @AAHI_Info, @AAPInews, @apcaaz, @APIAHF, @ASIAOHIO, @CBWCHC, @cdchep, @cpacs, @HBIDC, @HepBFoundation, @HepBpolicy, @HepBProject, @HepBUnited, @HepBUnitedPhila, @HepFreeHawaii, @HHS_ViralHep, @MinorityHealth, @njhepb, @NVHR1, @nycHepB, @NYU_CSAAH, @sfhepbfree, @supportichs @wahainitiative @jlccrum

Missing from the list? Contact the foundation at info@hepb.org to be added.

Don’t forget to join the World Hepatitis Alliance  Thunderclap and register your World Hepatitis Day events  prior to World Hepatitis Day. Be sure to participate in the #ShowYourFace campaign.  and tell the world how you’re standing up against viral hepatitis.

Still have questions? Email us at info@hepb.org and we’ll help you get started!

Visit the Hep B United and Hepatitis B Foundation websites for more information about hepatitis B and related programs.

Twitter Chat: Partner Highlights From Hepatitis Awareness Month

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Join Hep B United, the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, CDC’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, and the Hepatitis B Foundation for a Twitter #HepChat Wednesday, June 15 at 2 p.m. EDT. The chat will highlight Hepatitis Awareness Month outreach events and allow hepatitis B and C partner organizations to share their successes, challenges, and lessons learned from their efforts.

Continue reading "Twitter Chat: Partner Highlights From Hepatitis Awareness Month"

New Hepatitis B Treatment Guidelines Revealed at AASLD 2015 Conference

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The American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD), the organization that defines how doctors should treat hepatitis B and other liver ailments, unveiled new hepatitis B treatment guidelines this week at its annual conference in San Francisco.

The new guidelines are published here.  Patients should review them and discuss any updates that address their individual conditions with their physicians. Continue reading "New Hepatitis B Treatment Guidelines Revealed at AASLD 2015 Conference"

Celebrate World Hepatitis Day By Making Hepatitis B History

Joan M. Block, Co-Founder and Executive Director
Joan M. Block, Co-Founder and Executive Director

By Joan M. Block, RN, BSN
Executive Director and Co-Founder, Hepatitis B Foundation

Tuesday, July 28, is World Hepatitis Day, which commemorates the birthday of Dr. Baruch S. Blumberg, who won the Nobel Prize in Medicine for identifying the hepatitis B virus and developing a vaccine to prevent it. This year also marks the 50th anniversary of the discovery of the hepatitis B virus – a discovery that has literally saved hundreds of millions of lives.
Continue reading "Celebrate World Hepatitis Day By Making Hepatitis B History"

World Hepatitis Day: Preventing Hepatitis B in New York City

Screen Shot 2015-07-19 at 10.22.51 AMBy Vivian Huang, MD MPH,
Hepatitis B Program Director
at the Charles B Wang Community Health Center, NYC

World Hepatitis Day is commemorated on July 28 every year.  The date was selected to honor the birthday of the Nobel Laureate Professor Baruch Blumberg, who discovered the hepatitis B virus. Continue reading "World Hepatitis Day: Preventing Hepatitis B in New York City"

Join Hep B United and Watch the Hep B Summit Online!

hepb-united-btnThe Hep B United Summit in Washington D.C., starting Sunday afternoon and running through Monday, July 26 and 27, can be viewed LIVE and in real time on Periscope. Plus, you can follow the conversation on Twitter with #HepBSummit! Continue reading "Join Hep B United and Watch the Hep B Summit Online!"

Inexpensive Test Could Reveal Liver Cancer Risk

Could an inexpensive test, used in conjunction with current, traditional HCC testing help reveal one’s liver cancer risk? Research for the V-chip is described in an article published in this week’s  Health Canal

Scientists from the Houston Methodist Research Institute and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center will receive about $2.1 million from the National Cancer Institute to learn whether a small, low-cost device can help assess a person’s risk of developing a common form of liver cancer.

The four-year project is based on technology previously developed by Houston Methodist nanomedicine faculty member Lidong Qin, Ph.D., who is the new project’s principal investigator. Qin’s “V-Chip,” or volumetric bar-chart chip, will be used to detect biomarkers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common cause of liver cancer. The device only requires a drop of blood from a finger prick.


The V-Chip allows the testing of up to 50 different molecules in a blood or urine sample.

“Most of the burden of HCC is borne by people who have low income, with the highest incidence rates reported in regions of the world where infection with hepatitis B virus is endemic,” Qin said. “Developing an accurate and low-cost technology that assesses the risk of cancer could make a big difference to people who ordinarily can’t afford expensive tests.”

M.D. Anderson Department of Epidemiology Chair Xifeng Wu is the project’s co-principal investigator.

Qin and Wu will see whether the V-Chip accurately detects HCC biomarkers. The researchers will also determine which combination of these biomarkers proves most predictive of disease.

Among the biomarkers the researchers will look at are antigens of hepatitis viruses B and C, aflatoxin (a fungal toxin that at high doses is associated with cancer risk), and metabolic indicators of alcohol consumption, obesity, diabetes, and iron overdose.

Tests of the V-chip will not replace traditional testing methods, but rather be carried out in tandem so that patients’ care cannot be adversely affected.

Hepatocellular carcinoma is believed to be the third-highest cause of cancer death worldwide and the ninth leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. It is most commonly caused by a past infection of hepatitis viruses B or C (HBV or HCV) and cirrhosis of the liver caused by alcohol abuse or other toxic damage.

Please visit Health News, Health Canal for more information 

A Personal Reflection on China for World Hepatitis Day – Part II

(If you missed it, see part I) The second trip entailed the training of rural doctors.  During the training course, we used a number of simple visuals to better get some basic ideas across.  We wanted to drive home how common HBV was in China, and the number of Chinese people infected. We asked 10 people to stand up.  They smiled with pride, having been selected, until they realized they were being identified as one of those possibly infected with HBV.  The numbers dwindled as we went through the process of asking some to sit down representing those that had been infected, but resolved the virus, until finally, the last one standing represented someone with chronic HBV. This person was clearly horrified. This visual certainly drove the point home, but perhaps we were the ones educated by this process.

The Chinese people love children. I had a photo album of my children, which many enjoyed during the break.  There was one photo with a picture of both my two children and my colleague’s two children. My colleague and I were traveling with two of the children and had not identified if either were infected.  (As a result, we sat at every meal where most assuredly there was a large serving spoon in every dish…)  There was only one child that could be “safely” identified. When I pointed the child out to them, I could hear them, speaking in English, saying “Yes, I knew it.  Look at her.  She’s sick… doesn’t look well.”  I can’t even imagine what was said in Chinese.  HBV is nearly always asymptomatic in children.  All four children in the photo appeared equally healthy.  At that moment, I was grateful these children were spared the taunts.

During the course of the visit, we made an impromptu stop at a hospital on the outskirts of one of the cities.  We were shocked when we were permitted to enter the compound without pre-approval.  It was not a sanitized visit like all of the other stops we made.  We were traveling with a U.S. doctor, and I think the Chinese doctor we met was interested in speaking with her.  The facility was well below the standards we had encountered elsewhere. The largest building on the compound was the “women’s facility”.  We were not allowed in the building, nor were any pictures permitted of that particular building.

In another city we met with a conventionally trained doctor who had grown up in a very rural province, and was sometimes requested due to her rural background and familiarity.  She told us of a recent rural visit, where hundreds of women had been infected with an STD.  As a result of migration of workers into the cities, these women villagers are more often victims of diseases previously not seen in these areas.  Sadly, many of the women were being infected due to the lack of precautions taken during the annual examination of women.  The major culprit was the reuse of speculums that were not disinfected.

Finally, we met so many interesting, young Chinese, and heard so many wonderful stories like the one about a young university graduate who started the first online community of hbvers (that’s what they like to call themselves.)  It would turn out to be the biggest in the world, and would provide much needed support for many isolated Chinese, living with HBV.  There were also other stories, too, of how Chinese hbvers fought against discrimination by using a stand-in – either a paid “professional”, or other, loyal friends for their compulsory medical blood tests.  Imagine living with the fear of losing everything just because of the results of a simple blood test.

I went to China, naively thinking I would make a difference.  I was overwhelmed with the dire situation of those living with HBV.  The experiences and stories were sobering and haunted me for months after returning.  It was so personal. I certainly cannot  fix this global problem on my own, but I will do everything possible, so that others may understand, just a little, the impact of living with hepatitis B in China.