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What New Treatments Are on the Horizon for Hepatitis B/D Coinfected Patients?

Although there are highly effective treatments available to manage hepatitis B, there are few available treatments for hepatitis D, and none are U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved. Hepatitis D is the most severe form of viral hepatitis, and coinfection can accelerate liver damage and cause cirrhosis or liver cancer in as little as 5 years for some patients. Currently there is no approved drug for acute or chronic hepatitis B/D coinfection, but in trials pegylated interferon alpha has shown to be somewhat effective. By stimulating the body’s immune system, around 25-30% of patients are able to suppress their hepatitis D viral load with weekly injections over 48 weeks. Emerging research is showing higher rates of effectiveness with prolonged interferon treatment beyond one year, but it can be difficult for patients to continue due to the physical and mental toll of interferon on the body. Antiviral medications that are proven effective against hepatitis B are sometimes prescribed along with interferon therapy for patients with a high hepatitis B viral load, but these have no effect on hepatitis D. It is urgent that more treatment options be developed for the millions of hepatitis B/D patients that are eagerly awaiting them.

The good news is that with renewed scientific interest, research and funding, eight new drugs are currently in development that offer hope for more treatment options in the coming years. Two drugs have even been granted special designations by the FDA and one by European Medicines Agency (EMA), paving the way for increased resources and funding for development. Due to recent advancements, the future looks hopeful, and within a few years it is likely there will be more treatment options available. Below is a chart that provides more information on these new drugs and their current clinical trial status.

Pegylated Interferon Lambda

Pegylated-interferon-lambda (PEG-IFN-λ) is a well-characterized, late-stage, first in class, type III interferon that stimulates cell-mediated immune responses that are critical for the development of host protection during viral infections. This drug has now been granted “Orphan Drug Designation” by the FDA, fast-tracking the development process.

Myrcludex B

This drug is an “entry inhibitor” that prevents the virus from entering into hepatocytes (liver cells) and has shown activity against the hepatitis B virus. It may also stop the development of a hepatitis D infection. A recent study showed promise for Myrcludex B when combined with PEG-INF in reducing hepatitis D viral levels. It has been granted PRIME Eligibility by the European Medicines Agency, a status that promotes support in development of drugs that serve an unmet medical need.

Ezetimibe

Currently used to lower cholesterol in the blood, Ezetimibe is being studied for effectiveness against hepatitis D. Ezetimibe possesses pharmacophore features to stop NTCP, the receptor required for hepatitis B and hepatitis D hepatocyte entry.

Lonafarnib

This drug works by targeting the protein assembly process, preventing the production of new virus particles. In a current clinical trial, Lonafarnib combined with Ritonavir has shown promise in reducing hepatitis D viral levels, and the FDA has granted it fast-track status since this class of drugs have been developed for the treatment of cancers and have been shown to be safe.

Rep 2139

This compound is known as a “Nucleic acid-based Amphipathic Polymer” (NAP) which prevents the release of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) from infected liver cells and is being evaluated for hepatitis D virus in combination with pegylated interferon (PEG IFN).

GI-18000

GI-18000 Tarmogen is being studied for its effectiveness in causing a T cell immune response against cells infected with Hepatitis D and thereby improving outcomes. The strategy is to identify molecular targets that distinguish diseased cells from normal cells and activate the immune system to selectively target and eliminate only the diseased cells.

ALN-HDV

This approach is being used for both the hepatitis B and hepatitis D virus to “silence” the viral RNA with compounds that interfere with and cause the destruction of the viral genome (e.g. stop replication of the virus).

As clinical trials progress, sites may open across the world that are enrolling hepatitis D patients. Keep checking here for an up-to-date list of all current clinical trials.

Click here for more information about the phases of the clinical trial process.

For more information about hepatitis B/D coinfection, please visit www.hepdconnect.org or email us at connect@hepdconnect.org.

Be Brave: Join a Hepatitis B Clinical Trial and Help Find a Cure

Photo courtesy of CDC.
Photo courtesy of CDC.

By Christine Kukka

One of the bravest things people living with hepatitis B can do is participate in a clinical trial  to help find the drug that will one day eradicate the virus that infects more than 240 million worldwide.

There are medical and financial advantages to participating in a trial. We may gain access to a drug that is more effective than what is currently available. We may get free lab tests and medications, and we know we have helped millions of others in the pursuit of a cure.

For example, if you participate in the Hepatitis B Research Network Adult Cohort Study, which is currently collecting data on how hepatitis B affects in 2,500 people in the U.S. and Canada over a five-year period, you helps scientists better understand this disease while getting free annual liver tests.

There are different types of clinical trials, for example some compare the effectiveness of a new drug against current treatments. When TAF, a new formulation of tenofovir, was in clinical trials, one group of patients received TAF and the other received the standard tenofovir drug. Researchers then compared viral loads (HBV DNA) and liver health from the two groups to see if TAF was as effective as tenofovir in lowering viral load and reducing the risk of liver damage.

Other drug trials compare the effectiveness of a new drug against no treatment. In this double-blind study, a control group receives no treatment (a placebo – or sugar pill) and the other group gets the experimental drug. Researchers don’t know until the end of the study which participants received the experimental drug in order to achieve an objective view of a drug’s effectiveness.

Clinical trials are also used to test the accuracy of new monitoring equipment or approaches, or they can help define what screening practices work best in individual immigrant communities.

Photo by Amanda Mills of CDC.
Photo by Amanda Mills of CDC.

They can also assess the effectiveness of herbal supplements and vitamin D in reducing liver damage or help identify when a pregnant woman should receive antivirals to lower her risk of infecting her newborn.

There are drawbacks to clinical trials that participants need to know. While pharmaceutical companies have spent years developing new drugs and testing them in lab animals before they reach human clinical trials, some drugs will not work.

A recent example of this is the Arrowhead Pharmaceutical’s ARC 520, 521 and AAT drugs, which were in clinical trials on 300 people in 17 countries. Last month, Arrowhead halted the trials after test animals that were receiving much higher doses of the drug died.

And, some trial participants risk getting the placebo instead of the experimental drug. In many of these cases, if the “experimental” drug is successful, those who received the placebo eventually gain access to the new drug. Also, these trials take commitment, including your time, travel and perseverance. But one day, these trials will help find a cure, but it can’t happen without the help of people living with hepatitis B.

How do we find a clinical trial? Most hepatitis B trials are managed by clinical researchers who work at universities, large hospitals or pharmaceutical companies. But you do not have to be a patient at one of these institutes to participate in a trial.

Step 1: Talk to your provider at your clinic, primary care office or liver treatment center and tell them you’re interested in participating in a trial. If you find one you think you’d qualify for, show them the information. Your provider can refer you to a trial even if he or she isn’t participating directly in the trial.

Step 2: Your provider can contact the research center on your behalf, submit an intake form for you, and transfer your patient records after you complete a HIPAA form. Your provider can still continue to care for you even if you join a trial.

Step 3: If you qualify, you may have to travel to the research center at least once. After that, your blood tests and any other lab results can be performed locally and sent to the researchers.

Step 4: Do your research before you participate. Ask questions and make sure you understand how the trial will affect your health. If there’s a chance you’ll get the placebo pill, ask what will happen and if you get access to the drug later on. Make sure you get the information in your primary language and that trial doctors are culturally-sensitive. Trust and knowledge is essential.

Below are some resources to help you. If you need more information, contact the foundation at 215-489-4900 (U.S.) or email info@hepb.org.

Where to find a clinical trial

  • Hepatitis B Foundation’s directory  of hepatitis B-related clinical trials: This resource lists hepatitis B-related clinical trials registered with the U.S. National Institutes of Health. These include hepatitis B-related treatment and liver cancer trials for adults and children in the U.S. and around the world. They also include coinfections, hepatitis D and trials investigating ways to prevent mother-to-children transmission of hepatitis B during childbirth. You can also email the foundation for more information at info@hepb.org.
  • The U.S. National Institutes of Health directory of clinical trials. This is a searchable directory of all NIH-approved clinical trials. You can search by condition and location.
  • Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation: This offers a clinical trial database you can search, and the organization will also help you find clinical trials and email or mail you the information.  Call 877-MED HERO. Allow one to two weeks for response.

To watch a webinar about how to participate in a clinical trial, click here.

Do You Forget Your Daily Hepatitis B Antiviral? Why We “Forget” Our Meds, and How to Improve Compliance

Image courtesy of foto76 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of foto76 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

By Christine Kukka

Your daily antiviral pill can save your life when you have liver damage from chronic hepatitis B. Entecavir or tenofovir (Viread) quickly reduce the amount of virus in your liver and the damage it causes.

All you have to do is take it. Every day. But 20 to 30 percent of prescriptions are never filled, and about 50 to 70 percent of us don’t take our medications as prescribed. When we stop taking our daily antiviral, hepatitis B can reactivate and threaten our health.

In one study, researchers provided 100 hepatitis B patients with an entecavir pill dispenser that monitored whether or not they took their daily pill over a 16-week period. They found about 70 percent of patients took their antiviral pill as prescribed more than 80 percent of the time — which means these patients were “medication compliant.”

Those who missed taking their antivirals more than 20 percent of the time–and were “noncompliant”–tended to be younger and had indifferent attitudes about whether or not the antiviral was really needed or would work.

Image courtesy of Carlos Porto at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Carlos Porto at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

According to experts, whether we are “medication compliant” or not depends on how much trust we have in our doctors. If we like our healthcare provider and feel comfortable asking questions, we’re much more likely to take our medication on time. And, if our friends and family support and encourage us, we’re even more inclined to take our medication as prescribed.

“The trust I have in my doctor is a big factor,” said a member of the Hepatitis B Support List. “It is important to find a doctor who understands hepatitis B and is willing to work with me in terms of explaining what the options are and what the best approach is in managing my condition.”

“I know antivirals won’t cure me,” another email list member wrote, “but I’m committed to staying healthy and productive as long as God permits.” Continue reading "Do You Forget Your Daily Hepatitis B Antiviral? Why We “Forget” Our Meds, and How to Improve Compliance"

AASLD 2014 Liver Meeting – HBV Coverage

Unknown-5Get HBV Advocate’s Christine Kukka’s take on the top HBV related, published reports from the AASLD Liver Meeting as she provides her Top Ten List! 

 

Top Ten Reports from the 65th Annual Liver Meeting
By Christine M. Kukka, HBV Advocate 

Hepatitis B experts from around the world met at the 65th annual American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) conference in Washington D.C. this week to share the latest in hepatitis B treatment and research.

  1.  Which combination of antivirals and interferon works best against hepatitis B
  2. Tenofovir continues to excel with no signs of drug resistance after eight years
  3. Tenofovir treatment is safe over an entire pregnancy for both mother and child
  4. Tenofovir and entecavir combination successful against drug-resistant HBV
  5. Who remains at risk for hepatitis B in the U.S.?
  6. Antivirals appear to lower liver cancer risk
  7. But antivirals don’t reduce cancer risk in older patients with cirrhosis
  8. How long do patients have to keep taking antivirals after they lose HBeAg and achieve undetectable viral load?
  9. Liver cancer risk remains, even after HBsAg clearance in older, male patients
  10. Experts say treatment is needed when ALT levels are only moderately elevated

Continue reading "AASLD 2014 Liver Meeting – HBV Coverage"

Tenofovir Alafenamide Shows Similar Anti-HBV Activity with Less Kidney Toxicity

Great news from the 2013 AASLD Liver Meeting regarding a new, lower-dose formulation of Tenofovir for the treatment of hepatitis B

From HIVandHepatitis.com
Published Thursday, 21 November 2013 00:00Written by Liz Highleyman

A new formulation of tenofovir that can be taken at lower doses demonstrated potent activity against hepatitis B virus (HBV) similar to that of the existing formulation in a 28-day study, but with less effect on kidney function, researchers reported at the 64thAASLD Liver Meeting this month in Washington, DC. Continue reading "Tenofovir Alafenamide Shows Similar Anti-HBV Activity with Less Kidney Toxicity"