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Tag Archives: HBV research

HBV Journal Review February 2015

ChrisKHBF is pleased to connect our blog readers to Christine Kukka’s monthly HBV Journal Review that she writes for the HBV Advocate. The journal presents the
 latest in hepatitis B research, treatment, and prevention from recent academic and medical journals. This month, the following topics are explored:

  • Quality of Care for Women with Hepatitis B Varies Dramatically Across U.S.
  • One-third of HBeAg-negative Women Experience “Flares” After Childbirth
  • Immunizing Newborns Is an Effective Tool in Preventing Cancer
  • Experts Warn: Don’t Delay Treatment in Patients with HBV Genotype C
  • Antivirals Help Patients with Cirrhosis, If Started Early Enough
  • Entecavir Effective at Clearing HBV’s cccDNA from Liver Cells
  • Older Age and a Weakened Immune System Can Cause HBV to Reactivate
  • Survey Shows Doctors Fail to Adequately Screen for Liver Cancer
  • Innovative Venues Increase Hepatitis B Screening Among Asian-Americans
  • Study Finds Waste Collectors at High Risk of Hepatitis B
  • Study Comparing Four Antivirals Finds All Appear Effective

Continue reading "HBV Journal Review February 2015"

HBV Journal Review – November 2014

ChrisKHBF is pleased to connect our blog readers to Christine Kukka’s monthly HBV Journal Review that she writes for the HBV Advocate. The journal presents the
 latest in hepatitis B research, treatment, and prevention from recent academic and medical journals. This month, the following topics are explored:

  • Experts Say Breastfeeding While Taking Antivirals Is Safe
  • Doctors Fail to Adequately Treat HBV-Infected Women After Childbirth
  • Doctors Continue to Fail to Screen Asian-Americans for Hepatitis B
  • Statins Protect Hepatitis B Patients Against Heart Disease and Liver Cancer
  • New Study Finds Antivirals Lower Liver Cancer Risk
  • Studies Find Tenofovir Lowers Viral Load Faster Than Entecavir
  • Liver Transplants Safe in Older Hepatitis B Patients
  • Scientists Develop Micro Weapon to Disable HBV’s Cancer-Causing X Protein
  • Foreign-Born U.S. Residents Less Likely to Be Immunized
  • Antivirals Can Safely Replace HBIG Following Liver Transplantation
  • All Hepatitis B Patients Appear at Risk from Chemotherapy

Continue reading "HBV Journal Review – November 2014"

HBV Journal Review – July 2014

ChrisKHBF is pleased to connect our blog readers to Christine Kukka’s monthly HBV Journal Review that she writes for the HBV Advocate. The journal presents the
 latest in hepatitis B research, treatment, and prevention from recent academic and medical journals. This month, the following topics are explored:

  • Ground-Breaking Study Finds Antiviral Treatment Does Reduce Cancer Risk
  • Sequential Treatment of Antivirals Followed by Interferon Spurs HBeAg Seroconversio
  • Is the Current Recommended Dose of Entecavir Too Low for Some Patients?
  • Measuring Liver Stiffness, Spleen Size and Platelets Can Predict Cancer Risk
  • Tenofovir Effective in Patients with Lamivudine Resistance
  • Entecavir and Adefovir Combo Works Best in Lamivudine-Resistant Patients
  • When Is It Safe to Stop Antivirals? Experts Still Not Sure
  • Liver Stiffness Test Identifies Which Patients Develop Liver Damage After Treatment Stops
  • Study Suggest Hepatitis B Immunization Could Cut Diabetes Risk by Half
  • Herbal Medication Treatment Linked to Liver Failure in Patient with Hepatitis B

HBV Journal Review

July 1, 2014
Volume 11, Issue 7
by Christine M. Kukka

Ground-Breaking Study Finds Antiviral Treatment Does Reduce Cancer Risk

For the first time, an authoritative study has found that antiviral treatment appears to reduce the risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related liver cancer. Even though treated patients had more liver damage, their cancer rates were similar to untreated, healthier patients.

Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention examined the health records of 2,671 hepatitis B patients treated at four health centers across the U.S. between 1992 and 2011. Half of the patients were Asian-American and about 31% (820) had been treated with antivirals. The treated patients tended to have more liver damage, were older, male and less likely to be Asian-American than untreated patients in the study.

Researchers, reporting in the June issue of the journal ofClinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, found that 67 (3%) of the 2,671 patients developed liver cancer over the study period. Twenty of the 820 patients treated with antivirals developed cancer, compared to 47 of the 1,851 untreated patients.

Treated patients with viral loads less than 20,000 IU/mL had a significantly lower risk of cancer than untreated patients with similarly low viral loads.

Antivirals appeared to confer some protection against liver cancer even in patients with fibrosis (liver inflammation) and cirrhosis (liver scarring), suggesting that viral loads may be the primary culprit behind liver cancer. By suppressing viral load, liver cancer was avoided in many of these high-risk patients with serious liver damage.

Researchers wrote, “…We found that antiviral treatment had a beneficial effect across a spectrum of viral load levels (and disease severity.)”

Source: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24107395

Sequential Treatment of Antivirals Followed by Interferon Spurs HBeAg Seroconversion 
Chinese researchers found that hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg)-positive patients who were treated first with the antiviral entecavir (Baraclude) and then with pegylated interferon achieve a higher rate of HBeAg seroconversion (loss of HBeAg and development of “e” antibodies) than patients treated with only entecavir.

Continue reading the HBV Journal Review…

 

HBV Journal Review – July 2013

HBF is pleased to connect our blog readers to Christine Kukka’s monthly HBV Journal Review that she writes for the HBV Advocate. The journal presents the
latest in hepatitis B research, treatment, and prevention from recent academic and medical journals. This month, the following topics are explored:

*Experts Describe When to Treat Pregnant Women with Antivirals
Does pregnancy worsen hepatitis B?
When should pregnant women be treated?
Which antivirals are safe to use during pregnancy?
What if women have elevated ALTs before becoming pregnant and have never         been treated?
What about women with normal ALTs and high viral loads?
Is it safe to use antivirals during the entire pregnancy?
Monitoring recommendations after delivery
Can a woman taking antivirals breastfeed?
* Half of Patients Treated Long-Term with Tenofovir Lose HBeAg
*Even Patients with High Viral Load Lose HBeAg with Tenofovir
*New Type of Interferon Effective in Phase 2 Hepatitis B Trial
*Majority of Hepatitis B Patients Have Vitamin D Deficiency
*But Patients with Healthy Vitamin D Levels Are More Likely to Clear HBsAg
*Activists Develop a National Plan to Eradicate Hepatitis B in the U.S.
*New Guidelines Urge Britain’s Doctors to Improve Hepatitis B Care
*Measuring HBsAg Levels May Identify Fibrosis and Avoid Liver Biopsies
*HBsAg Levels May Also Predict Cancer Risk in HBeAg-negative Patients

HBV Journal Review


July 1, 2013, Vol 10, no 7
by Christine M. Kukka

Experts Describe When to Treat Pregnant Women with Antivirals
Two U.S. hepatitis B experts have crafted guidelines for doctors to use when deciding when to treat pregnant women infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) with antivirals in order to safeguard the women’s health and prevent infection of newborns.

More than half of new hepatitis B infections result from mother-to-child (vertical) transmission and despite immediate immunization and administration of HBIG (hepatitis antibodies), about 30% of infants born to women with high viral loads become infected. Additionally, women who want to become pregnant may already be treated with antivirals because of liver damage.  There is little medical guidance on whether treatment is safe over the entire pregnancy.

Does pregnancy worsen hepatitis B? Generally it does not unless the woman has cirrhosis (severe liver scarring.) Studies show a pregnant woman’s viral load generally does not increase over a pregnancy, but after the baby is born and the woman’s hormone levels change (akin to a sudden decline in steroids), some women experience a “flare” and their alanine transaminase (ALT) levels may increase due to moderate liver cell damage. Because of these flares, doctors must monitor new mothers carefully for several weeks after childbirth.

When should pregnant women be treated? Starting in the second or third trimester of pregnancy, antiviral treatment is recommended when women have high viral loads—exceeding 1 million copies per milliliter or 200,000 international units per milliliter. However, if women are already receiving antiviral treatment when they become pregnant, treatment should probably continue over the pregnancy to prevent worsening liver disease.

Which antivirals are safe to use during pregnancy? The experts recommend tenofovir (Viread) in the event the woman continues to need antiviral treatment because this drug has a very low rate of drug resistance, or telbivudine (Tyzeka). Both have been shown to be safe and cause no birth defects when used in pregnant women infected with HIV or HBV.

Continue reading about this and additional studies…


HBV Journal Review – June 2013

HBF is pleased to connect our blog readers to Christine Kukka’s monthly HBV Journal Review that she writes for the HBV Advocate. The journal presents the
latest in hepatitis B research, treatment, and prevention from recent academic and medical journals. This month, the following topics are explored:

• U.S. Doctors Failing to Treat Patients Who Need Treatment
• Doctors Say Poor Training and Limited Resources Contribute to
Substandard Care • More Proof—Many Patients with Slightly Elevated ALTs
Have Fibrosis • Tenofovir Reduces Viral Load in HBeAg-Positive Patients
Faster than Entecavir • Researchers Find Tenofovir Does Not Damage
Kidneys • Tenofovir and Entecavir Highly Effective—If Taken as
Prescribed • Family History of Liver Cancer Boosts Cancer Risk to 15.8%
Among HBV-Infected • Vitamin D Deficiencies Found in People with High
Viral Loads • More Evidence Shows Breastfeeding Does Not Transmit HBV
Infection • Cesareans Do Not Reduce Mother-to-Child HBV Infection
• 2% of HBV Genotype D Adults Lose HBsAg Annually

HBV Journal Review

June 1, 2013, Vol 10, no 6
by Christine M. Kukka

U.S. Doctors Failing to Treat Patients Who Need Treatment
Fewer than 50% of patients infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) who need treatment get antivirals or interferon from their primary care doctors and fewer than 70% of patients who go to university liver clinics get appropriate treatment, according to research presented at the Digestive Disease Week medical conference held in Orlando in May.

Stanford University researchers conducted a real-life study to see what percentage of 1,976 hepatitis B patients treated in various clinical settings over four years received treatment. They used current medical guidelines when evaluating whether patients received appropriate treatment.

Continue reading about this and additional studies…