Hep B Blog

Tag Archives: clinical trials

Ten Things People with Hepatitis B Need to Know in 2016

Image courtesy of Serge Bertasius Photography at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Serge Bertasius Photography at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In 2015, doctors continued to unlock the mysteries of hepatitis B and uncovered promising new treatments. Armed with new information, here are 10 things we can do in 2016 to safeguard our health and help prevent the spread of hepatitis B.

  1. Get monitored regularly. No one likes a blood draw or to be reminded they have hepatitis B, but it’s important that you’re tested annually or more often if you have a high viral load and/or signs of liver damage. There’s no cure yet, but there are effective treatment options with more in the pipeline. So be brave, protect your health, and go to the lab for a blood test.
  2. If you’ve been prescribed an antiviral, don’t forget to take it. Taking a pill every day is tedious and it’s tempting to skip it, but failing to take your daily antiviral reduces its effectiveness and can lead to drug resistance. The hepatitis B virus is a master at mutating to escape whatever is attacking it. Forgetting to take your daily pill can lead to an uptick in your viral load and liver damage. Stay strong, take your daily pill, and keep that virus undetectable.
  3. Face it, antivirals are a long-term commitment. Until a cure is developed, antivirals—either tenofovir (Viread) or entecavir (Baraclude)—are the best treatment to quickly reduce both viral load (HBV DNA) and liver damage. But they work for only as long as we take them, and once we start, we are usually committed to years of treatment. Quitting antivirals before we’ve achieved undetectable viral load and lost the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) often results in a resurgence of both viral load and liver damage. Antivirals are a long-term treatment that help prolong our lives.
  4. Demand to be screened for liver cancer. Some experts say current medical guidelines that recommend when we should be screened for liver cancer  don’t go far enough to protect us. So take charge of your health and ask for a liver cancer screen, which includes a semi-annual blood test and an ultrasound.  Hepatitis B-infected Asian men (or of Asian descent) over age 40 years and Asian women over age 50 years, patients with a family history of liver cancer, patients with cirrhosis, and Africans over the age of 20 should all be screened. Think you’re not at risk for cancer because you take antivirals? Think again. Antivirals help reduce liver damage, but if you’ve had cirrhosis or are older, the risk of liver cancer remains.
  5. If someone promises a new cure or treatment that sounds too good to be true….it probably is. In our search to be rid of hepatitis B, we may be tempted to yield to clever marketing and try a supplement that promises to cure us. But first, do your homework and practice precaution. To check out an herbal supplement, visit the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health’s website to see what scientific evidence exists for a supplement and talk to your doctor. There is no magic bullet that will cure hepatitis B. Experts hope to find one soon, but for now be patient and stay skeptical. If you want to safeguard your health, eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes.
  6. Experts say a cure is coming … so stay informed about new drug developments and clinical trials. There is lots happening on the research front. To find out what drugs are in the development pipeline, visit the Hepatitis B Foundation’s Drug Watch page for the latest news. You can also find out if you qualify for a clinical trial. Expensive blood work, treatment medications, and doctor’s visits are usually free-of-charge for those accepted into a study. The foundation features a list of hepatitis B-related clinical trials that are recruiting patients in the U.S. and around the world at its Clinical Trials page. You could become part of the cure.
  7. Pregnant with hepatitis B? Get your viral load tested and ask your doctor about antivirals. In November, the American Association for the Study of Liver Disease (AASLD) for the first time recommended that pregnant women with viral loads (HBV DNA) higher than 200,000 IU/mL (or 1 million copies/mL) receive an antiviral (either tenofovir or telbivudine) starting at their 28th week of pregnancy. The antivirals won’t hurt you or your baby and will reduce the risk that your baby will be infected with hepatitis B to nearly zero, as long as your baby gets the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine and a dose of HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) within 12 hours of birth.
  8. Fight discrimination against hepatitis B and know your rights. Hepatitis B should never be a barrier to the education or job you want. Sadly, ignorance and stigma remains in the U.S. and abroad. It depends on us, our friends, and our family, to stand up and fight for our civil rights. We can’t back down. If we don’t fight, who will?
  9. Practice safe sex and never re-use needles. Today, in some areas of the U.S., hepatitis B is increasing—even though a safe and effective vaccine exists. Unfortunately, not everyone is immunized and the infection is still getting transmitted sexually. In the midst of America’s heroin epidemic, it’s also spreading when syringes are re-used and shared. Do you want to end hepatitis B? Make sure your friends and family members know how to prevent sexually-transmitted infections (even if those conversations are challenging, their lives may depend on it) and support needle exchange programs in your region and state. Countless studies show that when needle exchange programs are available, HIV, hepatitis B and C rates decline! It saves lives and healthcare dollars!
  10. Be brave, disclose, and get your friends, family, and lovers screened for hepatitis B and vaccinated. Yes, it will be one of the hardest conversations you will ever have, but if you are infected with hepatitis B, you need to disclose your infection to people who may be at risk. If you just discovered you have chronic hepatitis B, which you may have contracted at birth, you need to tell your siblings and your mother and get them screened and immunized if needed. Dating someone, and about to take the next step? You need to disclose ahead of time and give them information and choices. It builds trust and it’s the right thing to do. You would want the same for yourself.

Continue reading "Ten Things People with Hepatitis B Need to Know in 2016"

Clinical Trials Webinar -What YOU need to know!

Why do we have clinical trials? What is involved with clinical trial participation? How do I find a trial that’s right for me? Find out by listening to this webinar from Liver Cancer Connect, a dedicated program of the Hepatitis B Foundation. Presenters Jill McNair of the Center for Information & Study on Clinical Research Participation, and Katelyn Levy, BS, clinical research coordinator at Johns Hopkins Suburban Hospital, explain what clinical trials are and answer frequently asked questions about participating in a trial.

Continue reading "Clinical Trials Webinar -What YOU need to know!"

Clinical Trials in Liver Cancer: What You Need to Know

diversegroupMyth: Clinical trials are only for people with advanced stages of cancer.

Fact: No! Trials are available for all stages of cancer, not just for people who have advanced cancer that is not responding to treatment.

If you or a loved one needs treatment for liver cancer, clinical trials are an option to think about. Continue reading "Clinical Trials in Liver Cancer: What You Need to Know"

The Drug Discovery Process

It takes talent, dedication, lots of  time, and a sizable investment to bring a safe and effective drug to market. The Drug Discovery Process YouTube video, compliments of PhRMAPress, introduces the long and arduous drug process from the identification of a compound in the lab, though clinical trials and the FDA approval process. It may sound simple, but this process may take up to 1,000 people, 12-15 years and up to 1.3 to 1.6 billion dollars to put a new drug in the hands of the patient.

Consider this process when following the progress of  hepatitis B drugs on the Hepatitis B Foundation Drug Watch page.  Compounds could remain in various stages for years. Note that the “preclinical” phase represents the drugs that are still in the lab and not yet ready for human clinical trials.

The Hepatitis B Foundation also maintains a webpage with the latest hepatitis B related clinical trials. Contact information is provided for each trial for those wishing to volunteer to participate.  Volunteers must meet the criteria for participation in a trial.

The future looks bright for a functional cure for hepatitis B. It may take a few more years to get the drug into the hands of the patient, but each step of the process is crucial in order to produce a drug that is both effective and safe.




The Hepatitis B Foundation’s Hepatitis B Clinical Trials Page

Did you check out Tuesday’s Hep B Blog, “Participating in HBV Clinical Trials” for those living with Hepatitis B?  It’s time to have a more in-depth look at the HBV  trial entries that are updated monthly on The Hepatitis B Foundation’s (HBF’s) Hepatitis B Clinical Trials web page. Roughly 350 trials out of the 112,278 clinical trials maintained by ClinicalTrials.gov pertain to HBV related studies.  The ClinicalTrials.gov site is a registry of trials that located in 175 different countries.  Changes to ClinicalTrials.gov are an ongoing process.

Each month the HBF’s Hepatitis B Clinical Trials web page is updated based on a thorough review of clinicalTrials.gov registry.   Trials that are new and are recruiting are added.  Completed trials are deleted, and modifications are made based on the “last updated date” of the each trial entry. All identified trials are active and currently recruiting patients. Modifications may include anything from additional site locations added to the trial, to new contact information, or even a change in protocol.  A few international trials are in an unknown state, but remain on our page until we hear word if the trial is completed, or no longer recruiting patients.  If you are local and interested, it is worth pursing to get the current status.

The page is divided into U.S. trials, International trials, Co-Infection trials, Pediatric trials, HBV & Liver Transplantation, HBV & Liver Cancer, and HBV Reactivation and Lymphoma. Some of these categories are more recent and were added to address other areas for those living with HBV.

Recently HBF has made an effort to include trials, within the country of origin for the trial, that not only treat HBV, but also monitor patients.  These long term studies may use new, experimental techniques to monitor HBV patients, or those at high risk for HCC.  There are also opportunities to participate in long-term studies that monitor patients and look for common factors, trends etc. among those living with HBV.  It’s another opportunity to meet with  cutting-edge liver specialists, and possibly even contribute by helping researchers determine factors that may cause HBV disease to activate, or worsen, or hopefully improve.

So have a seat at your computer and review HBF’s Hepatitis B Clinical Trials web page, or go to the individual section that interests you.  The trials listed contain the original title, the purpose, or basic description of the trial.  Due to logistics, the trial site is very important, which is why all entries contain the countries included in the site unless they are too great to list. Then they are listed as “international“. Contact information is also maintained and updated, with a link to email and phone contact info.  Most importantly is the NCT number (NCT followed by an 8 digit identifier), or ClinicalTrials identifier, which is how all trials are referenced in the ClinicalTrials.gov registry. By clicking on the NCT#, you will be linked to the trial of interest directly within ClinicalTrials.gov, where you can investigate the details of the trial and see if it is of interest, and whether or not you meet the criterion for participation.

Give it some thought and think about whether an HBV clinical trial is an option for you.  Discuss your ideas with your liver specialist, and confer with others in HBV support groups that may have experience with a drug, or past clinical trial experience.  Feel free to contact HBF with any questions you might have regarding clinical trials.

If you think of a way to make our clinical trials page more user-friendly, or trial categories that might be missing, be sure to leave a comment and let me know.  And if you happen to find an HBV trial that is recruiting, but is not listed, please be sure to let us know. HBF is here to help!