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Tag Archives: CDC Division of Viral Hepatitis

Join a Twitter Chat: National Organizations Share Highlights From Hepatitis Awareness Month and Strategies for Successful Events

HAM Chat Image







Join Hep B United, the National Viral Hepatitis Roundtable, NASTAD and CDC’s Division of Viral Hepatitis for a Twitter #HepChat at 2 p.m. (EST) Thursday, June 8. The chat will highlight Hepatitis Awareness Month outreach events and allow hepatitis B and C partner organizations to share their successes, challenges and lessons learned from their efforts.

Continue reading "Join a Twitter Chat: National Organizations Share Highlights From Hepatitis Awareness Month and Strategies for Successful Events"

Join the Conversation at the Hep B United Summit; Watch the Summit On Periscope!

hepbunited-btnThe annual Hep B United Summit, organized by the Hepatitis B Foundation, convenes in Washington D.C. from Wednesday, July 27 through Friday, July 29. National and local coalition partners, experts, stakeholders, and federal partners will meet to discuss how to increase hepatitis B testing and vaccination and improve access to care and treatment for individuals living with hepatitis B.

You can watch many of these important sessions LIVE on Periscope. You can also follow the conversation at the Summit on Twitter with #Hepbunite!

What is Periscope? Periscope broadcasts live video worldwide, in real time, so you can watch it from your computer (via web link) or a mobile device (via Periscope app). The app is free and available for your phone (iPhone and Android) and iPad or Tablet.

Wondering how to use Periscope to watch the Hep B United Summit in real time? There are two options:

  • If you’re using a PC, keep an eye out for a tweet from Hep B United and/or the Hepatitis B Foundation Twitter handles (@hepbunited or @hepbfoundation) that will contain a link to take you directly to the stream.
  • If you’re on the go, you can download the Periscope app for free from the App store or Google Play. You can either login using Twitter or directly with your phone number. Create your Periscope username and then follow hepbunited and hepbfoundation. We’ll be sure to follow you back! Here’s a great Periscope tutorial from Traffic Generation Café to get you started. You can also click on the link from your twitter app.

Here are the details on the sessions that will be broadcast on Periscope:

State of Hepatitis B
1:45-2:15 p.m. Wednesday: Brian McMahon, MD, will provide an update on the state of hepatitis B globally, via a GoToMeeting connection.

Click and watch later here. 

Hep B United and Know Hepatitis B Campaign Accomplishments
2:15-3 p.m. Wednesday:  Cynthia Jorgensen, DrPH, of the CDC’s Division of Viral Hepatitis will provide an update on Hep B United and the Know Hepatitis B campaign accomplishments of the past year.

Click and watch here.

HHS Town Hall on Hepatitis B
9:30 a.m. Thursday:  There will be a town hall conference with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), live from HHS.

Click and watch here.

Breakout Session 1:

Developing New Hepatitis B Partnerships and Increasing Awareness
10:45-12:00 p.m. Friday: Contribute and learn about expanding outreach to new sectors (businesses, other at-risk communities, providers, etc.) and hepatitis B education strategies including social and ethnic media engagement. (Facilitators: Thaddeus Pham and Arcadi Kolchak)

Click and watch here.

Leveraging Data and Evaluating Impact
10:45-12:00 p.m. Friday: Discuss and collaborate on hepatitis B data collection and publication strategies, working with IRBs, and leveraging data to evaluate and promote coalition/organization impact. (Facilitators: Moon Chen and Chari Cohen)

Click and watch here.

Breakout Session 2:

Building and Sustaining Local Hepatitis B Coalitions
1:15-2:30 p.m. Friday: Develop strategies to sustain local hepatitis B coalitions and learn about engaging staff and local leadership. (Faciliators: Alex Shirreffs and Mohammad Abdul-Kadir)

Click and watch here.

Navigating Patients and Linkage to Care Strategies
1:15-2:30 p.m. Friday: Contribute to and learn about patient navigation strategies, including overcoming language barriers and working with community health workers and physician champions. (Facilitators: Nirah Johnson and Jane Pan)

Click and watch here.

 Not able to join the sessions with Periscope? Follow the conversation on Twitter using the #Hepbunite hashtag. Follow the events, RT and engage with event attendees and help us raise hepatitis B awareness in the U.S. and around the globe.

World Hepatitis Day is July 28th, and this Summit is a terrific opportunity to share with the world what we’re doing to help those living with hepatitis B in our communities.

Other popular hashtags for World Hepatitis Day, and to raise HBV awareness, include: #NOhep, #KnowHepB, #WorldHepDay, #WHD2016, #hepatitis, #hepatitisB, #HBV, and #hepB

Connect with, follow and engage with some of fellow partners on twitter to keep the HBV conversation going during the HBU Summit and World Hepatitis Day events, and beyond. Check out: @AAPCHOtweets, @AAHC_HOPEclinic, @AAHI_Info, @AAPInews, @apcaaz, @APIAHF, @ASIAOHIO, @CBWCHC, @CCACCInc, @cdchep, @cpacs, @HBIDC, @HepBFoundation, @HepBpolicy, @HepBProject, @HepBUnitedPhila, @HepFreeHawaii, @HHS_ViralHep, @ImmunizeAction, @LaoCenterMN, @MinorityHealth, @njhepb, @nemssf, @NVHR1, @nycHepB, @NYU_CSAAH, @sfhepbfree, @supportichs, @WhiteHouseAAPI,

Missing from the list? Contact the foundation at info@hepb.org to be added.

Don’t forget to join the World Hepatitis Alliance Thunderclap and register your World Hepatitis Day events.

nohep logo

Still have questions? Email us at info@hepb.org and we’ll help you get started!

Visit the Hep B United and Hepatitis B Foundation websites for more information about hepatitis B and related programs.

“Hepatitis on the Hill” Advocates Fight for Hepatitis Prevention, And So Can You

Hepatitis on the Hill advocates, March 2016.
Hepatitis on the Hill advocates, March 2016.

On Tuesday, March 8, more than 120 advocates from across the U.S. fanned out on Capitol Hill to talk to their representatives about the importance of funding the Viral Hepatitis Division of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dozens of people laid their hearts on the line and told their stories about how they, their families, and friends have been touched by hepatitis.

In meetings with Congressional staff, and in some cases their senators, they shared stories about family members who discovered they had hepatitis B only when they were diagnosed with late-stage, inoperable liver cancer. Others talked about how lucky they were to have been immunized at birth, considering their mothers were infected. Courageous advocates described losing loved ones to hepatitis B and C spread through the heroin epidemic, and recalled indifferent healthcare workers who saw only addicts instead of human beings who had  lost their battle with both addiction and hepatitis.

Our goal was to get our representatives to allocate more funding for CDC’s hepatitis division, which is sorely needed. It’s CDC’s job to investigate disease outbreaks and educate the public and healthcare providers about infectious disease. For example, CDC publishes a variety of reports and promotional materials to educate people how to protect themselves against hepatitis B and C. The agency also funds a “hepatitis coordinator” in nearly every state whose job it is to help prevent hepatitis, investigate outbreaks, and collect data—a Herculean task for just one person. Continue reading "“Hepatitis on the Hill” Advocates Fight for Hepatitis Prevention, And So Can You"

Viral Hepatitis Action Alert!

red-phoneRepresentatives Mike Honda, Hank Johnson, and Judy Chu are asking all House Representatives to sign an important letter supporting increased funding for viral hepatitis programs in the Fiscal Year 2015 appropriations bill (see text of letter below)

Please take a few minutes before March 25th to call your House Representative’s office in Washington, DC and ask/him to sign this letter.

You can reach your Representative through the Congressional Switchboard at (202) 224-3121. Ask to be connected to your Representative. Once you are connected to the office, ask to speak to the staff person who handles health care issues. Whether you speak to that person live or leave a voicemail, tell them (1) your name, (2) where you live and that you are a constituent, (3) that you would like the Representative to sign the “Dear Colleague” letter from Representatives Honda, Johnson, and Chu supporting increased funding for viral hepatitis and (4) a brief message why this issue is important to you. Tell them they can sign the letter by contacting Kelly Honda in Representative Honda’s office, Scott Goldstein in Representative Johnson’s office, or Linda Shim in Representative Chu’s office. The deadline for Representatives to sign is March 25th.

Text of “Dear Colleague” letter from Representatives Honda, Johnson, and Chu:

Support Funding for Viral Hepatitis

March XX, 2014

The Honorable Jack Kingston
Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services
United States House
Washington, D.C., 20515

The Honorable Rosa DeLauro
Ranking Member
Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services
United States House
Washington, D.C., 20515

Dear Chairman Kingston and Ranking Member DeLauro:

As you begin deliberations on the Fiscal Year 2015 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill, we would like to respectfully request that you allocate $47.8 million for the Division of Viral Hepatitis (DVH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an increase of $16.4 million over the FY2014 level.

The CDC’s 2010 professional judgment (PJ) budget recommended $90.8 million each year from FY2011-FY2013, $170.3 million annually from FY2014-FY2017, and $306.3 million annually from FY2018-FY2020 for DVH in order to comprehensively address the viral hepatitis epidemic. While past increases have been helpful, these have only been small steps toward building a more comprehensive response to viral hepatitis. Our recommendation of $47.8 million is in line with the needs determined by the PJ and the goals of the Viral Hepatitis Action Plan, but pales in comparison to the CDC’s PJ.

The need to enhance and expand these prevention efforts is growing more urgent. Viral hepatitis is the leading cause of liver cancer – one of the most lethal, expensive and fastest growing cancers in America. More than 5.3 million people in the U.S. are living with hepatitis B (HBV) and/or hepatitis C (HCV) and 65-75% of them are undiagnosed. Without an adequate, comprehensive surveillance system, these estimates are only the tip of the iceberg. Viral hepatitis kills 15,000 people each year and is the leading non-AIDS cause of death in people living with HIV – nearly 25 percent of HIV-positive persons are also infected with HCV and nearly 10 percent with HBV.

The epidemic is particularly alarming because of the rising rates of new infections and high rates of chronic infection among disproportionately impacted racial and ethnic populations, and presents a dramatic public health inequity. For example, HCV is twice as prevalent among African Americans as among Caucasians. Asian Americans comprise more than half of the known hepatitis B population in the United States and, consequently, maintain the highest rate of liver cancer among all ethnic groups. Additionally, African American and Latino patients are less likely to be tested for HCV in the presence of a known risk factor, less likely to be referred to treatment for subspecialty care and treatment, and less likely to receive antiviral treatment. Recent alarming epidemiologic reports indicate a rise in HCV infection among young people throughout the country. Some jurisdictions have noted that the number of people ages 15 to 29 being diagnosed with HCV infection now exceeds the number of people diagnosed in all other age groups combined.

Further, the baby boomer population (those born 1945-1965) currently accounts for two out of every three cases of chronic HCV. As these Americans continue to age, they are likely to develop complications from HCV and require costly medical interventions that can be avoided if they are tested earlier and provided with treatment options. It is estimated that this epidemic will increase costs to private insurers and public systems of health such as Medicare and Medicaid from $30 billion in 2009 to over $85 billion in 2024, and also account for additional billions lost due to decreased productivity from the millions of workers suffering from chronic HBV and HCV.Over the last two years, CDC and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) have begun to align their recommendations for hepatitis screening, recommending one-time testing of baby boomers and screening vulnerable groups for HCV.

We appreciate the Committee’s support for viral hepatitis prevention, in particular the increased support to prioritize the identification of HBV and HCV-positive individuals who are unaware of their status. We strongly encourage you to sustain your commitment this year. We have the tools to prevent the major causes of viral hepatitis and liver cancer – a hepatitis B vaccine and effective treatments that reduce disease progression, new diagnostics for HCV and treatments that increase cure rates over 90%, and even more medical advances in the research pipeline. Making this relatively modest investment in the prevention and detection of viral hepatitis represents a key component in addressing a vital public health inequity and will get more Americans into care, strengthen our public health infrastructure and combat the devastating and expensive complications caused by viral hepatitis.



Viral Hepatitis Action Alert!


HAP – Hepatitis Appropriations Partnership

 Urge Your Members of Congress to Support Viral Hepatitis Funding

In Their Appropriations Programmatic Requests



With the passage of the continuing resolution (CR) for FY2013 at the FY2012 levels (before the sequester) and no Prevention and Public Health Fund allocations, we do not know the total, final funding level for FY2013 at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Division of Viral Hepatitis (DVH) or the future of the $10 million they received in FY2012 for a testing initiative. The President’s FY2014 budget has not yet been released. We need your help in raising awareness among Members of Congress about the viral hepatitis epidemics and asking their support for increased funding for viral hepatitis activities at the federal level.  Viral hepatitis advocates are urging for a total funding at the Division of Viral Hepatitis of $35 million, an increase of $5.3 above the total FY2012 level.

In the next week and a half, all Senators and Representatives will write their “programmatic appropriations request letters,” which ask members of the Appropriations Subcommittees (who put together the federal funding legislation) to include funding for their priorities. The more Members of Congress that include a request for hepatitis funding in their letters, the greater the likelihood the Appropriators will include additional funding in FY2014.

As you know, viral hepatitis impacts over 5.3 million people nationwide. With a lack of a comprehensive surveillance system, these estimates are likely only the tip of the iceberg and 75% of those infected do not know their status. Even with these daunting figures, there are only $19.7 million in federal funding dedicated to fund viral hepatitis activities nationwide at the CDC in the CR for FY2013, before sequester.  Members of Congress need to know that viral hepatitis is a concern in their district, that their constituents are being affected and that this is an issue they need to care about. We need you to tell your story and ask your elected representatives to take action by April 12.

Additionally, the CDC released FY2012 Grant Funding Profiles by state, here. When you click on your state and “Generate Report,” your state’s viral hepatitis funding is included in the report.

Step-by-step instructions on what to do are below:

1.   Determine what Members of Congress to contact.  You should contact your personal Member of the House of Representatives and two Senators.  You should also contact other House Members in areas where your organization is located or provides services.  To determine who your Representative is please go to www.house.gov and type in your zip code(s); to determine who your Senators are go to www.senate.gov and select your state from the drop down menu.

2.   Call the Members’ Offices to get the name and correct spelling of their health staff person.  Email the staff using the draft email text below.  House staff emails are First.Last@mail.house.gov (john.smith@mail.house.gov) Senate staff emails are First_Last@Last name of Senator.Senate.gov (john_smith@doe.senate.gov)

Sample email:
Your Name
State and Zip code

Dear (Name of Health Staffer):

My name is ____________ and I live in City/State. I am writing to urge Representative/Senator________________ to include funding for viral hepatitis in his/her Fiscal Year 2012 programmatic appropriations request letter.  [Include brief details on the impact of viral hepatitis on yourself or describe your organization].

There are over 5.3 million Americans impacted by viral hepatitis but, in FY2012, the only dedicated federal funding stream provided a mere $29.7 million through CDC.  This is insufficient to provide the most basic public health services such as education, counseling, testing, or medical management for people living with or at risk of viral hepatitis.

I urge Representative/Senator ___________ to support a total funding level of $35 million for the Division of Viral Hepatitis in FY2014 to effectively combat these epidemics.  I will be following up with you in the near future to discuss this request.  In the meantime, feel free to contact me with questions.

Thank you again for consideration of my request.

Your Name

3.   Follow-up with the staff you have emailed with a phone call to confirm they received the request and to determine when they may have an answer from their bosses as to whether or not they will include a hepatitis funding request in their Appropriation programmatic request letter.  If asked, make it clear to the staff that this is a program request and NOT a project request (i.e. money for a district specific project like a bridge, hospital or university).  You may need to follow-up again around the time the staff says they will have an answer from their chain of command.

4.   If you need assistance or want to talk through the process please email or call Oscar Mairena at (202) 434-8058 or omairena@NASTAD.org. If the staff member requests “report language” or “program language,” please contact Oscar and he will provide that for you. Please also share positive responses with the Hepatitis Appropriations Partnership by contacting Oscar.

Oscar Mairena
Manager, Viral Hepatitis/Policy and Legislative Affairs
National Alliance of State & Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD)
444 North Capitol Street NW, Suite 339
Washington, DC  20001
Phone: (202) 434.8058      Fax: (202) 434.8092
omairena@NASTAD.org     www.NASTAD.org
“Bridging Science, Policy and Public Health”