Hep B Blog

Recently Diagnosed with Hepatitis B? Getting Through the Next Months Waiting to Confirm if Your Infection is Acute or Chronic

Have you recently been told you have hepatitis B?  Dealing with the diagnosis and waiting out the next six months to determine if your infection will resolve itself or learning that it is a chronic infection can be nerve-wracking.

Fortunately, greater than 90 percent of healthy adults who are newly infected will clear or resolve an acute hepatitis B infection.  On the hand, greater than 90% of babies and up to 50% of children infected with hepatitis B will have lifelong, chronic infection. Sometimes people are surprised to learn they have a chronic infection. It can be confusing since there are typically few or no symptoms for decades. If a person continues to test hepatitis B positive for longer than 6 months, then it is considered a chronic infection. Repeat testing is the only way to know for sure.

Acute hepatitis B patients rarely require hospitalization, or even medication.  If you are symptomatic, (some symptoms include jaundice, dark urine, abdominal pain, fever, general malaise)  you may be anxiously conferring with your doctor, but if you are asymptomatic, you might not feel compelled to take the diagnosis seriously.  Ignoring your diagnosis can be very serious. If you have concerning symptoms like jaundice (yellow eyes and skin), a bloated abdomen or severe nausea and vomiting, please see your doctor immediately. Your doctor will be monitoring your blood work over the next few months to see if you clear the virus, or monitoring your liver if there are concerning symptoms.

Your job is to start loving your liver …today.  STOP drinking alcoholic beverages.  Refrain from smoking cigarettes.  Your liver is a non-complaining organ, but you cannot live without it.  Make your diet liver-friendly and healthy filled with a rainbow of vegetables and fruits, whole grains, fish and lean meats. Minimize processed foods, saturated fats and sugar.  Drink plenty of water.

Talk to your doctor before taking prescription medications, herbal remedies, supplements or over-the-counter drugs.  Some can be dangerous to a liver that is battling hepatitis B.  Get plenty of rest, and exercise if you are able.

Don’t forget that you are infectious during this time, and that loved ones, sexual partners and household contacts should be tested to see if they need to be vaccinated to protect against hepatitis B.  Sometimes family members or close household contacts may find that they have a current infection or have recovered from a past HBV infection.  If anyone fears exposure ensure them that hepatitis B is not transmitted casually. They should get tested, and vaccinated if needed, and take simple precautions. Remind them that 1/3 of the world’s population will be infected with the hepatitis B virus during their lifetime.

On the flip-side… Do not let this new hepatitis B diagnosis consume you.  As the weeks and months pass, you might find that the infection is not resolving, and you might worry that you have a chronic infection.  The associated stress and anxiety can be challenging, even overwhelming.  It can contribute to physical symptoms you may be experiencing.  Find a family member, friend, or health care professional with whom you can share your concerns.

If you are told you have recovered from an acute HBV infection (you are now HBsAg negative, HBcAb positive and HBsAb positive) be sure to get copies of your lab reports to ensure there are no mistakes. Compare them with our easy to use blood tests chart.   If something looks wrong, or if you’re confused, speak up and ask your doctor. Once confirmed be sure to include hepatitis B as part of your personal health history. This is important in case you have conditions later in life that warrant monitoring.

No one wants to learn they have chronic hepatitis B but it is a manageable disease. You’ll want to see a doctor with experience treating chronic HBV so they can run additional tests. There are very effective treatments available, though not everyone with chronic HBV needs treatment. All people living with chronic HBV benefit from regular monitoring since things can change with time. Please do not panic or ignore a chronic hepatitis B diagnosis. Take a deep breath and get started today learning more about your HBV infection and the health of your liver.  Things are going to be okay!

If you are confused about your diagnosis, please feel free to contact the Hepatitis B Foundation at info@hepb.org.

Comments on this blog are closed. If you have questions about hepatitis B or this blog post, please email info@hepb.org or call 215-489-4900.

255 thoughts on “Recently Diagnosed with Hepatitis B? Getting Through the Next Months Waiting to Confirm if Your Infection is Acute or Chronic”

    1. Distinguishing between acute and chronic HBV can be a little confusing and will likely require blood tests over time…roughly one to six months. An acute case would be noted with blood work positive for surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBc-IgM. Ultimately you are looking to lose the surface antigen (HBsAg) and gain the surface antibody (HBsAb). That takes time and will vary with each person. Unfortunately, 10% will not clear their acute infection, and will become chronic. Paste these links in your browser for more information and of course, never hesitate to contact info@hepb.org with your specific questions: http://ht.ly/5eHEC http://ht.ly/5eHKU

      1. am hep b positive for last 4 months and to fight it off in 6 months time. at the moment i feel pains around my liver area and nausea and sometimes headache. please what recommended drugs do i need to cure it totally.

        1. Hello: Unfortunately there are no drugs that will make your hepatitis B infection go away. Have you talked to your doctor about these symptoms? Also, have you had an ultrasound and a simple blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). Our liver cells release ALT when they are damaged or die. Healthy ALT levels for men are up to 30, and for women they are up to 19. Please consult with your doctor and see what your ALT levels are and share your symptoms. Good luck.

  1. Hi everyone – I just want to share my experiences about being a chronic hepa b carrier. I had this disease since 1999 during the time I learned that I was pregnant with my first child, the count of the virus started 2000. I felt ashamed and I distanced myself to everyone for fear that I might infect them. But I am more worried for the new life I am bearing in my womb. There are hundreds of nights that I can’t sleep and think about what will be our future together. As the time passes by, I decided to forget about it and go on with my life as a new mother. But of course in everything that I do I did not forget to asked from our good Lord for guidance and to be with me during this hardest days of my life. In year 2008, I decided to have myself undergo lab test for hepa profile again and I got so worried again as from 2000 count went to 4300 count so it seems to me that the virus is replicating. I tried to read a lot about hepa b diseases and how can i manage to get over it at least in subtle manner. In year 2010 I decided to have myself be tested for hepa profile again and the result is from 4300 count went to 4699 count. It was so depressing but still I tried reading about all infos that will help this disease at least be reduce. I went on taking lemon water for almost six months now, i also tried lemon water with grated fresh garlic, actually the one that I am concerned with is about the high blood pressure that I am having but since i read that lemon has the ability to cleanse the blood, i understand that it has also help in cleaning my blood where my hepa b is present. I even tried the gluthathione as it says that glutha is also a big help for the liver. I only took them for a month and gradually stop. I went back to drinking lemon water again. Also I frequently received my communion every Sunday, as I believe that the blessed body of Jesus will cure me with this disease. Just 4 days ago, I decided to undergo lab test again, hepa profile and SGOT/SGPT. I do not know if I will feel happy or not but I am confused as the hepa b virus count went to 3000, my SGPT is 16 and SGOT is 26 with count value of 40/UL. My HBcIgG/HBcIgM becomes reactive with remarks that since my count is so low, the reading result will still be positive. Now I become acute carrier again from being chronic, I see this as God’s way as my chance to recover from this disease, I need to monitor myself after a month as I already went to Internist/Cardiologist and told me to have a lab test again after a month to monitor.
    I think my faith to God that he will never forsake me with this disease in favor of my three small children and with some help of lemon water helps.

    Please help me pray that I may be able to get over with this disease so I can go back to my normal life and apply for work as I have been unemployed for so many years now for fear that the company might detect that I am a hepa b carrier. My children are growing fast and with the crisis around the world I only think of helping my husband by going back to work so we can both provide our children’s needs specially in school.

    Thank you for your time reading my story.

    Regards to all,
    TC

    1. Thanks so much for sharing your story. I hope others will take heart, and share their HBV story, too! Certainly a healthy diet, adequate sleep, exercise, and a positive attitude will help your general health and the health of your liver. It is highly recommended that all those living with HBV be monitored by a liver specialist. The lab results can be confusing and it is important to have input from an experienced doctor. Regards to you, TC. I wish you well.

  2. HI
    I was recently diagnosed with Hepatitis B and found out after further tests that, thankfully, it was only acute and that I had developed the surface antibody. I feel very lucky as a result. I have been looking on the internet for extra advice about whether I need to make any long term changes for the future. I fully intend to rest and avoid alcohol and eat healthily etc for the next six months at least.
    Howerver, I am not a heavy drinker but am worried that even occasional drinking may be harmful for the rest of my life, even once the six months have passed and my liver has returned to normal. Is this the case that I shhould absolutely avoid alcohol forever now?
    I would be really grateful for some advice as I can’t seem to get the answer to elswhere. Thanks very much for your help.
    J.

    1. Glad you were able to clear your acute infection. Moderation is the key to all things. Since you have cleared your acute infection, an occasional alcoholic drink should be fine unless your doctor had other concerns.

  3. hbs ag was positive 6 months back.. n now da reports shows it as negative.. wat exactly does it mean??

    1. Please talk to your doctor to confirm your test results, but if you have recovered from your HBV infection then your results will be the following: HBsAg negative, HBcAb positive, HBsAb positive. It looks like you have resolved your infection, but please confirm. If you have cleared it then you do not need to worry about getting HBV again and do not need to be vaccinated for HBV.

  4. hi
    am 21 my doctor said i have acute infection,am waiting for six months to pass,to go for another test my liver is not damage alot just abit increased can i resume drinking after am negative coze i used to drink alot?

    1. I am sorry to hear about your acute infection. Please do not drink alcohol while your body is trying to fight the hepatitis B infection. Your doctor will test you 6 months from now. In 6 months if you learn that you are HBsAg negative and HBsAb positive, then you will have cleared your acute infection. If you are tested and learn that you are still HBsAg positive and HBsAb negative, then it will mean that you have a chronic infection and that you will need to see a liver specialist. If you recover from your infection then you will not need to worry about getting HBV in the future. Although you are infectious to others at this time, if you clear the infection then you will no longer be infectious. At that time you will be able to eat and drink what you would like, though remember to be good to your liver since it does so many important things for you. If you learn you have a chronic infection then you should not drink any alcohol since it can be a dangerous combination.

  5. hi
    am still left with two months to go back an check whether the virus has cleared from my body but I still get stomach upset and pricks around the liver, am worried , what are some reasons people fail to clear off the virus?

    1. If you know you have an acute infection, it is good to think about how 90% of healthy adults that are infected with HBV as an adult will clear the virus. They may have symptoms or they may not. Your symptoms would not be uncommon or worrisome, but of course if you have pain that concerns you, please talk to your doctor. Those that do not clear the virus may have other immune system or health issues . Try not to worry too much.

  6. hi
    my six month are not yet over ,is ok for me to start going to gym, I feel am strong, or it might affect me and fail to clear off the virus.

    1. Return to the gym. There is no problem with exercise. In fact, exercise is good for you. Eat healthy and stay hydrated and don’t over-do.

  7. Hi. Two months ago I was diagnosed with HBV and my test results were as follows: HBsAg = positive, HBsAb = negative, HBc IgM =positive. HBeAg = negative and HBeAb.= positive.
    Dose this mean I have an acute infection? I am worried about the pains I feel at the upper right part of my abdomen. This pain has been there for two months now and comes with mild fever. When will this pain subside? I do not drink alcohol nor smoke.

    1. You appear to have an acute infection based on your positive HBcAb IgM value. Your pain is likely due to symptoms as result of your acute infection, but you will need to see a doctor to confirm and make sure everything is okay. Most people resolve their acute infection without medication, but it is possible for a person to require supportive care. It’s good you do not smoke or drink. Avoid taking any tylenol, acetaminophen or paracetamol for the pain. Once again, talk to your doctor to be sure everything is okay. Don’t forget to repeat testing in 6 months to be sure you clear the infection and that it does not become chronic.

  8. if the pains over the liver area is persisting for long, should that mean that the liver is seriously being damaged?

    1. It is impossible to say. You need to be evaluated by your liver specialist. The pain could be related to something else or it could be HBV related.

  9. Pls I hv bn diagnosed HBV positive for a long time now,I am 29years of age. n I hv bn undergoing treatment from one organisation call Hepatitis Viral Association of Nigeria. They treat me with some kind of supplements, one of them is Puritan’s pride live ANew capsules, Burdock capsules n other two different drugs since April 2013. Is over five months now, Initially I wz ok wt d treatment, but at a time since 2months ago I started having this sharp pains and hottness around my liver, I complained and I wz asked to go for Viral Load screening test which d Load reported 3260IU/ml n dat HBV infectivity requires at least 100 IU/ml of replication competent HBV DNA. At dis Load they changed few of d drugs dey give me, and this time because of d constant pains especially when am about to menstruate n wen am in menstrual period. They changed the Puritan’s Pride Live ANew to Puritan’s. Silymarin Milk Thistle Extract Capsules, Quercetin Capsule, Burdock and another drug too. With these treatments I still feel pains and some hot sensation on my Liver, though am about to menstruate. Pls I need to know if it is normal to be having pains n these hotness on d liver even when treatment is going on or wen d liver tissues are repairing? Thanks in anticipation of ur swift response.

    1. I am not familiar with these treatments, though I have read about an herbal treatment out of Nigeria, perhaps this is it. I have not seen studies or any clinical trial data to verify these products so there is no way to guarantee their authenticity. I don’t know what your original viral load was so I cannot tell you if you have improved or not. Most people don’t experience pain when they are on conventional medications unless they are immune modulators (IFN or PEG) There can be other reasons for pain in the upper right quadrant, but they certainly can be a result of inflammation of the liver. Did they run any liver function tests? Your ALT (SGPT) in particular would be important to know. You would want to compare with previous levels. Your viral load is elevated, and might require conventional treatment with an antiviral such as tenofovir or entecavir, but that would depend on if you are HBeAg positive or negative, your ALT and other liver function tests. I do not really know what you are taking, but if this is an herbal remedy, you could be doing more harm then good. Can you get a second opinion from another liver specialist?

  10. What are the prospects of getting a cure for HBV? Are scientists close to any drug discovery? I am so worried. I am 37 years old and i really want to know why some people cant clear the virus and what one can do not to fall within this group of people. I have not found any testimony from people who have cleared it. Do they really exist in Africa or it is just a way to give hope to people who have the virus. How will one tell from his test results if HBcAb IgM is in high titre so he can atleast hope he is acute? Could HBcAb IgM be positive when it is in low titre? I am morally broken…..

  11. Hi am left with one month to go for the determinant test for wether I have cleared of the virus or not but am worried that I drunk and smoked constantly for 2 weeks coze of friends I took a lot of wine,I don’t feel any pains,I feel just normally please advice me I don’t have any other complications is there any possibility of me getting a chronic infection.

    1. 90% of healthy adults will clear an acute case of hepatitis B. The constant smoking and drinking may result in liver damage – especially since your body has been busy trying to fight the virus. You will need to see what your test results show when you repeat testing next month.

    1. Any alcoholic drink is bad for the liver when you have hepatitis B. I know there are possible benefits to the heart due to antioxidants and resveratol (when red wine is consumed very moderately), but when you have HBV the risks to the liver outweigh any potential benefits to the heart. Please do not drink wine or other alcohol.

  12. Hi. I went for echography last week and the doctor revealed to me the coupled with the HBV infection, i also have DIFFUSE STEATOSIS of the liver. Please do advice me on this. Our doctors (gastroenterologies) in my country seem not to want to deal with HBV. I have met three already and they all have interpreted my results in different ways. My results are HBsAg = positive. HBsAb = negative. IgM HBcAb = positive. HBeAg=negative. HBeAb= positive. ALT = 32. The first Doctor said I was fine though I will have the virus all my life. I asked him about clearance and he said it did not exist. The second said that since HBeAg is negative and HBeAb is positive, it meant I have had the virus for atleast 10 years and must already be suffering from Cirrhosis. The third said he will put me on treatment and I will clear it in one year. I do not know who to believe again. I am from Cameroon.

    1. I am sorry you are getting so many confusing opinions from your doctors. Are there any liver specialists in Cameroon? Your situation really needs to be confirmed by a doctor – everything including a physical examination. I can tell you that at this time there is no complete cure for HBV. If you do have significant damage to your, which your doctor would see evidence of it in your liver function tests and your imaging studies. your ALT is not very elevated at this time (normal is 30 IU/mL for men), but there are other important, liver tests that will indicate the health of your liver. It’s likely your liver disease has progressed over years. Often patients with cirrhosis are put on antivirals such as tenofovir or entecavir, in the U.S. I am afraid I cannot provide much insight.

  13. hey
    I have been tested hbv positive last year, and the doctor told me I cleared the virus and developed anti-bodies. my test pannel is HBSAG Negative, anti-hbc positive, anti-hbs positive. bearing in mind the above diagonsis, will I develop complications in the future like cirohosis for liver cancer? I stopped drinking alcohol and smoking after the infection. Am I at risk for complications? please advise me thank you so much.

    1. As discussed via email, you do not need to worry about reinfection with hepatitis B, and you do not need to worry about further complications such as liver cancer and cirrhosis after resolving your acute hepatitis B infection. Just be sure to let doctors in the future know that you had an acute HBV infection in the past and that you cleared it.

  14. Good Day

    2 days ago I confirmed that I had hepa b, counts 1472.16 and i about to go back home, but now im starting eating vege and more in fruits in that I start drinking water with lemon. i just want to ask that regarding my counts is consider as acute or chronic?

    Best Regards
    TC

    1. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for more than 6 months. I would encourage you a hepatitis B panel run (one blood draw, with 3 tests HBsAg, HBcAb, HBsAb) in a few months. if you continue to test HBsAg+ after 6 months it is a chronic infection. While you wait, continue to take good care of your liver health as you are doing (be sure to avoid alcohol) and take simple precautions to avoid transmission to others by avoiding direct contact with infected blood and body fluids.

  15. Hi I hv been dignosed as hep b positive
    My viral count is in 6 crore my hbc igm is positive
    I got symptoms like jaundice after 2 months it seems to be recovering but I am worried if its chronic or acute.
    My viral count is so high does that mean its chronic..?
    I havent take any drug but bed resr and I have been recovering so is it a sign of acute infection.
    I am worries please reply.

    1. You have a positive anti-HBc IgM which typically indicates a new or acute infection, but you must be sure to followup with your doctor for testing. Sometimes a flare in a chronic infection might cause a positive anti-HBc IgM which is why followup is crucial. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg+ for more than 6 months. Your liver specialist is the best person to give you an idea if this is an acute or chronic infection. He knows your viral load and your ALT levels and has a good idea of your overall health. While you wait, be sure to avoid alcohol, drink good, clean water, eat healthy foods and get up and move around a bit. Treatment is not usually necessary for those acutely infection. Followup with your liver specialist

  16. Its second month after getting symptoms. Although I am recovering my lft test seems quite normal now but when whould I do my next hbsag test again..? What I know is incumbation takes 2 months and after incumbation I already have 2 months of disease should I test after 2 months bcz my doctor says I should get my test done after 6 months.. why should I wait for so long bcz I already have 4 months completed with virus. I have doubt that I was in physical contact with someone on 16th july now its jan its almost going to b 6 months so can it be chronic now..? And if its chronic then why I am recovering without medicine I am 28 years old. Thanks

    1. Testing isn’t typically based on when you think you should be tested, it’s based on 6 months after you first test HBsAg positive. How often you are tested is between you and your doctor. Fortunately, HBV is not typically an emergency, so waiting an additional couple of months should be fine. If you have a chronic infection and if this is a flare, then it would be normal to “recover” after the flare. If you continue to test HBsAg+ after 6 months then you will want to see a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and liver health. I know this is a challenging time, but take good care of yourself and try to be patient.

  17. Hello to everyone!
    I was diagnose to have hepa b November last year. I have undergone several lab test in the ff. markers: HBsAg (positive), Hbe Antigen (negative), Anti-HBc IgM (Negative), Anti-HBe (Positive), Sgot (24), SGPT (23) and my ultrasound liver test result is normal. I would like to know if my case is an acute or chronic. I am advised by my doctor to have my next test by May of this year. Please help me interpret my result and what should be the test result on my next test on the ff. markers for me to be declared clear from hep b. My doctor also prescribe me no medicine and that i only need me to value my health (healthy lifestyle). Can you also share to me what is the best vegetable and fruit that would help me treat my illness?

    Thank you very much for your helpful advices.

    1. Be sure to followup with testing in May as indicated by your doctor. If you have cleared an acute infection, then your values should be the following: HBsAg negative, HBcAb positive, HBsAb positive. If they run additional tests, you should see that you are HBeAg negative, HBeAb positive and an undetectable HBV DNA. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for longer than 6 months. While you wait be sure you do NOT drink alcohol. HBV and alcohol is a dangerous combination. Eat vegetables, fruit, whole grains and limited lean meats. Drink plenty of water and be sure to exercise. A healthy diet and exercise benefits the liver.

      1. Hello!
        What are these results?
        HBs Ag. Negative
        HBs Ab. Negative
        HBe Ag. Negative
        HBe Ab. Positive
        HBc Ab. Positive

        I got very sick a few weeks after getting a tattoo…so I took this same test twice (a few weeks after the tattoo…and then 6 months after the tattoo.) Both times the result was the same.
        Does this mean I was exposed to the virus? My doctor says no. Then why is HBc Ab positive for antibodies if I don’t have the virus? and I thought a positive HBe Ab means you are chronic… And although Hbs Ag was negative both times, I still haven’t developed a positive HBs Ab after 6 months of exposure to the tattoo…? Please explain?
        This is very confusing. ?

        1. Hello: It could be that you are in the process of clearing an acute hepatitis B infection. You test negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) but your immune system hasn’t generated enough surface antibodies (HBsAb) to show up in the tests. Think of a war going on between your surface antigens and antibodies. The antibodies are slowly winning and have eradicated most of the surface antigen, but they haven’t generated enough antibodies to show up in the lab test. I recommend you get tested again in three to six months to see if your surface antibodies become detectable. Good luck.

          1. Thank You for your response.
            Just to be clear…is it at all likely that these home tests results are showing a False Positive? And if it could have, then wouldn’t the second test rule that possibility out? The tests were taken 3 months apart from each other…
            Tattoo date- Sept. 21. 2016
            1st test- Dec. 13. 2016
            2nd test- March 27. 2017
            And what will it mean if in 3 to 6 months…Still no antibodies show up? Will that mean that I do have it and it’s chronic? Even tho the HBs Ag are still negative?

          2. Hello: I know this is frustrating, but there are things we don’t know about hepatitis B or can’t be predicted, including how long it takes to clear an acute case of hepatitis B. The average is six months, but if someone has a weak immune system, or drinks or smokes, or has another medical condition, it may take longer, or he or she may end up developing chronic hepatitis B.
            Also, in some people, if they clear the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) after having chronic hepatitis B, that represents a “cure” of sorts. (Please read: http://www.hepb.org/blog/forget-surface-antibodies-if-you-have-both-undetectable-viral-load-and-hbsag-you-might-be-functionally-cured/)
            Medicine is still an art form, all we recommend is you continue to be tested every three months and see your doctor to monitor what happens. Good luck.

  18. ws diagnsd wth hbv last year march,in august my dr told me my virus ws on low positive,does it mean i hve clear da virus or abt 2.am worried coz i hve been assumng lately

    1. Having a low viral load does not mean you have cleared the virus.You want to be sure to talk to your doctor to be sure you understand your current HBV status and liver health. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg+ for longer than 6 months.

  19. Hi,
    I had to do a blood test for hepa B last week because of my work and it came positive. I got vaccination two years ago (2011 Nov., three doses in three week plus a booster 9 month later). Two month after the vaccination (2012 Jan.) I was tested and I was negative. Now the lab said that I have HBsAg in my blood (though very low count) so I’m infected. My question is: is it possible that I produce positive HBsAg because of the vaccine? If this is not possible, then how comes that I got vaccinated, had a negative result 2 month later and and now I’m infected? What is the likelihood of that?
    I asked for a pcr test because I doubt I have the infection but I need to know anyway.
    Thank you for advise!

    1. Sometimes a person will have a false positive HBV test if they test within 1 month of an HBV vaccine shot. It doesn’t sound like this applies to you. There is certainly the possibility of a lab error, but there are a couple of other scenarios. If you were not tested for HBV prior to your vaccination series it is possible that you were actually HBV+ prior to vaccination. The vaccine does not work for those that are already infected. The other possibility is that you you did not respond to the vaccine series and the booster, and you were acutely infected and are now positive. I would agree to repeat testing and if it is positive then you will need additional testing including a PCR.

  20. Thank you for reponse hepbtalk!
    I had a negative result of hep b 2 month after the vaccination so more likey that the vaccination didn’t work for me and I got infected later on (if I did). How canit be checked that the vaccination didn’t work for me?
    What happens if someone is vaccinated and get infected (the virus gets into the persons bdy)? Will HbAsg be produced despite the body fights of the infection? How the viral load would look like in a situation like this?
    Unfortunately I don’t have the results in hand yet, if I get them I’ll ask for your advice again.
    Thank you.

    1. Right now there is no way to check. Although it is not recommended unless you are in a high risk exposure field (health care etc), you can have your anti-HBs titers checked 1 to 2 months after the last injection of the HBV vaccine series to see if you have generated an adequate titer. If an adequate titer is not generated, you can repeat the series and recheck the titer. if you fail to generate an adequate titer after 2 complete vaccine series, then you are considered a vaccine non responder. Anyway, in your situation it sounds like either a false positive lab result or that you were exposed and infected after a failed vaccine series. You will want to repeat testing to clarify whether or not you have a new, acute infection or if you had a false positive.

  21. Hello Doctor, i had acute hepatitis b last october.i tested in February my result is HbsAg negative but Hbsab negative.i was waiting for developing Hbsab in my blood.i just tested again.but still Hbsab negative.what does mean?why are not Hbsab developing?i’m just waiting for persisting Hbsab.past time i used some alcohol.was it depend on detecting Hbsab.pls advice me doctor.i’m so worrying about that.thank you so much

    1. I would retest in another few months. Hopefully you will gain the antibody. If you do not gain the antibody, you have to consider the fact that you may not clear the infection. Some adults do not clear an acute HBV infection, or it could be that it was not an acute infection, but rather a chronic infection. Did your doctor run an anti-HBc IgM titer test? Often when this test is positive it indicates an acute infection, but it is not conclusive. I would encourage you to completely refrain from drinking alcohol for the next months and be sure to take care with your liver health by eating healthy and exercising regularly. There are not guarantees this will clear your HBV, but it is best to take care of your liver health as best you can – especially if you are trying to clear an acute infection. BTW, I am not a doctor.

  22. This is a wonderful resource to inform people about this disease.

    I am a bit confused though, as I thought even people with only acute Hepatitis B would still be contagious after it has resolved. A lot of websites make it clear that anyone who has ever had Hepatitis B may never donate blood. Are blood centers just playing it safe?

    In addition, if those with acute Hepatitis B that has resolved itself are indeed no longer infectious after the fact, is it still advised for them to warn future or potential sexual partners even after the infection has cleared?

    1. It is true that you are NOT able to donate blood or tissues if you have a current or resolved HBV infection. A person that resolves an acute HBV infection is not infectious to others. Basically if there is no detectable viral load then you are not infectious to others. with an acute infection a person has resolved their infection and they are HBsAg neg and HBsAb pos with an undetectable viral load. Chronically infected patients may have an undetectable viral load, though it may fluctuate over time which is why regular monitoring is so important. So if you have a resolved infection, you do not need to warn future sexual partners. However, you should not try to donate blood.

      1. Hi please can you advice and help me too. I’m 20 yr old guy just found that I am infected with Hepatitis B acute and I was supposed to go to Medical School so I would like to know if am I still safe to go there and I would like to know if drinking or consuming a lot of Vitamin C rich food can help me reduce or clear the virus…please help i

        1. If you are sure this is an acute HBV infection then this should not interfere with medical school in any country. In the U.S, a chronic HBV infection should also not interfere with your career as HBV is covered under the ADA. You will want to check back within 6 months to be sure you have cleared the infection and do not have a chronic infection. Do NOT drink alcohol during this time as alcohol and HBV are a dangerous combination. Avoid smoking and environmental toxins. Be sure to drink plenty of good clean water, and eat healthy foods such as vegetables, fruits, whole grains and limited lean meats. Avoid fast foods, processed foods and meats. Please remember that you are infectious at this time so take care to avoid transmission to others.

  23. hi
    I am 46 yrs age, recently i was diagnosed to have acute hepatits B with hbsag aand IgM postive
    i am having sever joint paints particularly in shoulder , elbow and small joints of hand
    it has been 3 weeks now still i am having joint pains , my SGOT have come down from 800 to 302 and SGPT from 800 to 555
    why my sgot sgpt still raised , how long it takes to for sgot sgpt to resolve in acute hepatitis B or is it that i am having acute flare and i was chronically infected . MY usg is normal
    pls help me clear my worries i have already shown to liver specialist
    i am havening sleepless nights
    shall i start with antiviral treatment after undergoing viral load testing , is it indcacted as my sgot sgpt are still high after 3 weeks
    regards

    1. Sorry to hear of your acute HBV infection. Fortunately greater than 90% of healthy adults will clear a new, acute HBV infection within 6 months without the need for any medications. Many experience few or no notable symptoms, but some do – such as yourself. Fortunately your ALT/AST is declining, which is good. It may take a while for them to come down to normal (<30 Iu/mL for men. Since your enzymes seem to be on the decline, and I can only assume your liver function tests are also declining as well, then there would likely be no need for an antiviral, but certainly discuss with your liver specialist. Be sure to repeat testing in 6 months to be sure your acute HBV infection has cleared. If you have not cleared the infection then you will want to discuss with your liver specialist.

    2. Hi my son tested positive to hepatitis b in August 2016. Doctor say it is acute stage but infectious bcoz viral load is 30064ui. The jaundice has cleared and the LFT is improving but has persistent stomach ache (gastric pain) is it bcoz of the hepatitis infection. His next appointment is in January 2017. Do we need to go back and complain. Is it possible to resolve the acute infection? He is 16 years old. HBCAb positive, HBc Igm positive, HBeAg positive

      1. Hello: When someone is first infected with hepatitis B, it is considered an acute infection. More than 90 percent of healthy adults (and older teens) who are acutely infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. If he has continued to have uncomfortable stomach pains, you should contact the doctor. I’m glad he is getting monitored carefully. Make sure to practice universal precautions with him, as you know his blood and body fluids are infectious at this stage, so make sure any cuts or bruises are bandaged and make sure all family members have been tested and vaccinated. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
        Good luck.

  24. Hi I knew I had hepatitis b last month after I tested to apply for studying abroad.I would have never known it because there was no symptoms at all.I have tested hepatits b panel and tests resulted as follows hbsag positive, hbeag positive and Igm hbcab positive.All liver test is normal and usg as well.About four five years I was vaccinated with hepatitis b vaccine and my hbsab was negative.Do I have acute or chronic hepatitis do I have chances to fight off or clear the virus or again my body will not be able to produce hbsab..I am healthworker so I am not sure when exactly I got virus.. thankyou hope for your reply s oon…

    1. Based on your hepatitis B panel results and your anti-HBc IgM test, it would indicate that you have an acute hepatitis B infection. However, sometimes a positive anti-HBc IgM test will be positive if a person with chronic HBV is having an acute exacerbation. So although this test can be helpful, it is not definitive. The only way to confirm whether or not you have an acute or chronic infection is to repeat testing. A person is considered chronically infected if they continue to test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months. If you have an acute infection, then you will most likely clear it since greater than 90% of healthy adults newly infected with HBV will clear the infection on their own without a need for treatment or medication. If you learn you have a chronic infection then you will want to see a liver specialist to learn more about your HBV and liver health. HBV often has no symptoms in those acutely infected and possibly not for decades for those chronically infected. While you wait take care of your liver health with no smoking, avoiding alcohol and environmental toxins and eating a healthy, well balanced diet. Take care to avoid transmitting HBV to others by avoiding direct contact with blood and body fluids – keep cuts etc covered, practice safe sex and take care to not share personal items such as razors, toothbrushes – or anything that may have trace amounts of blood on them. At this time you are HBeAg positive which indicates you are very infectious at this time. Be sure to followup with testing.

  25. Hi I am 21 yrs old ,i have been diagnosed with hepatitis b one month back when i was applying for studying abroad.I have consult the doctor and perform hepatitis b panel test and test resulted hbsag, hbeag and igm hbcab positive.I am health care worker , I have also been vaccinated about five years back and my body didn’t produce hbs ab .Do i have acute hepatitis b or chronic hepatitis b ?Do i have chances to clear the virus and resolved the infection?I am worried my liver enzymes are also normal .It’s been one month there was no symptoms at all but it’s been two days i am having flu like symptoms.Hope to fall under those 90%people who can resolve on their own ..Hope to get reply soon thankyou.

    1. I answered your same question previously. Certainly flu like symptoms may be the result of an acute infection or an acute exacerbation. Hopefully you will be one of the 90% or more of healthy adults newly infected with HBV that will clear it, and that it is not a chronic infection. Be sure to repeat testing.

  26. Hi i m21yrs i hv been diagonised with acute hbv last 2 Month and last week i Had my blood test and it came. The result was hbsag positive, hbsag 26.6 Positive, hbeag positive, anti hbeag positive, hbv dna viral load 22300 Iu/ml.and according to this result. Aftr six month my hbsag test will come to negative?, can i travl long jrny by bus?. Can i play football and volley ball with my frnd?. can i ride bike?.Pls help thanku.

    1. If your HBV infection is a new, acute infection then you will likely clear it. 90% or more of healthy adults will clear their infection without the need for treatment. If you remain HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months then you are considered chronically infected and should be evaluated by a liver specialist to learn more. While you wait, take care to not transmit HBV to others. It is transmitted through direct contact with blood and infected body fluids. Be sure to keep cuts etc. covered, practice safe sex and do not share personal items that may have even trace amounts of blood on them (razors, toothbrushes etc). Be sure avoid drinking alcohol at this time and maintain a healthy weight and be sure to exercise – bike ride with friends etc. Don’t forget to go back and repeat your test results.

  27. Hi what are the diet which should be avoided during acute hepatitis b and which food are good?? Is is always necessary that people with acute hepatitisb showing jaundice symptoms only can recover ??Acute hepatitis b patient without jaundice symptoms usually with few skin allergies can recover or not?? Now it’s almost three months I have some allergies type skin rashes in my body and no other symptoms so I waana know do I have chanches to recover or not ??Asymptomatic acute hepatitis b get’s resolved itself ??

    1. Avoid alcohol and drink plenty of good, clean water. Focus on eating vegetables, fruits, whole grains and limited lean meats. Avoid fast food, processed foods and meats. Yes, people acutely infected may have jaundice, though many have few or no symptoms. Just be sure you are being carefully monitored by your doctor. The itching and rash may also be the result of the HBV. Hopefully you will clear your acute HBV or if you have chronic HBV and are having a flare that it will soon subside. Once again, be sure you are monitored by your doctor. Greater than 90% will clear an acute infection, the problem is that some are not they had an infection so they assume it is new. Talk to your doctor,but be sure to repeat testing. A person is considered chronically infected if they test HBsAg positive for greater than 6 months.

  28. Thankyou very much for your suggestions I will keep all your suggestion in mind and follow it and I wish I could share good news regarding my hepatitis b status..hbsag turning negative soonn…more than two months to go to face moment of truth whether I have cleared it or not ..finger crossed praying god.

  29. Hi i am hepa b positive since 2005. I had my last laboratory hbeag negative antihbe positive and sgpt 19. I want to study in new zealand but im afraid to fail the medical examination. Thanks..

    1. You will need to check on the policy for New Zealand. I am not sure if they screen for hepatitis B and if positive, whether or not it impacts student visas, though I suspect they would not, but I cannot say for sure.

  30. can i ask you a question.. i had diagnosed to get hepatitis b. i maybe will proceed my study abroad next year in US. can i go to study abroad? or did my visa cannot be passed?

    1. Not typically. However, should you ever need treatment for cancer or a condition requiring long term immune suppression, you would want to be sure to tell your doctor of your previously resolved acute infection so you could be monitored during treatment.

    1. You can ask the doctor to run an anti-hcb Igm test to see if it is positive. Unfortunately this is not always conclusive as it can sometimes indicate an acute exacerbation of a chronic infection. Sometimes a good hepatologist will have a good idea based on other data, physical exam and history, but to truly confirm you will want to rerun the hepatitis B panel 6 months from the first positive HBsAg test.

  31. hi,
    i have finished third and final dose of HBV vaccine. i finished it in august first week this year and after one month ie in this september first week i tested for antiHBS titre
    and my result came reactive with 15000ml/ul . am i immuned to Hep B now? can i have sexual pleasure with my boy friend who has Hep B? Pls guide me.

    1. Hello: Yes, you are immune to hepatitis B because of your effective vaccine. You need at least 10 mIU/mL to be protected, so you certainly are with your high antibody count. Remember, it’s always a good idea to use a condom, there are many more sexually transmitted infections than just hepatitis B! We admire that you were immunized to protect yourself! Good luck.

  32. hello.
    my boyfriend caught hbv virus in last january. its more than six months now but still he is hbsag + . so may be he is chronic now. we went to liver specialist here in india and got LFT test . his ALT is 190 and AST is 80 . so level is elevated . doctor suggested him to go for HBVDNA test . he has tested for same but results are yet to come. can u guide about this? is there any possibility that acute hep b can take sometimes more than six months to get resolved.
    secondly, i started studying about chronic hep B now. i came to know that there are three stages of it. immune tolerant stage, immune clearance stage and inactive stage. so what is the aim for medication? i mean , at which stage one should suppose to reach be safe. my boy friend has ALT/AST level elevated so is he in immuno clearing active stage? and by medication should he suppose to reach inactive immuno control stage where his ALT/AST will be normal and viral load will be low? and after reaching there , is it possible to have again HBV activated stage? what about those who are in tolerant stage and have ALT/AST normal but having high viral load and they are carriers ? do they need medications or they should wait till they reach to active stage? all these very confusing. can you guide me about this? thank you and regards.

    1. Hello: According to experts, after six months his infection has to be considered chronic. As you noted, his ALT is elevated at 109 (normal for men is less than 30). Under medical guidelines, he should be treated. His doctor is waiting for viral load in order to get a clear picture of his overall health. Is he hepatitis B “e” antigen positive or negative?
      If this infection moved in a linear fashion, people first have high viral loads and normal ALTs (the immune tolerant stage) because their young/weakened immune system don’t notice and fight the infection. Next, their immune systems notice the infection and produce the hepatitis B “e” antibody and their ALT levels rise as the immune system attacks the HBV-infected liver cells. At this stage viral load may decline, but treatment may be necessary because of the liver damage. Also, antiviral treatment at this stage, for example, would help reduce the virus so the immune system has a better chance of eradicating the virus and the infection.
      Lastly, one achieves “inactive” hepatitis B, with a low viral load and no discernible liver damage. However, even at this stage people must continue to be monitored because the risk of liver damage never really goes away.
      In reality, the infection rarely follows this path, someone may have periods of inactive hepatitis B and then an active stage. Your boyfriend may have had hepatitis B for a long time, and perhaps he has moved out of the immune tolerant stage and is now in the active stage, when his immune system is fighting the infection.
      It sounds like you have a doctor who knows hepatitis B. If the doctor decides treatment is needed at this time, (he may want to wait and watch for a little while longer), the first-line recommended antiviral treatments are tenofovir (brand name Viread) and entecavir (Baraclude.)
      Good luck.

  33. thank you for such a valuable guide lines. i dont know my boy friend is hbeag positive or negative. i asked doctor about that test but doctor told me that it is not needed. doctor suggested for LFT test, ultrasound test, hbvdna test. i told you about his LFT test results. his ultrasound report is normal. HBVDNA test reports are about to come. i think my boyfriend had new infection because in march 2014 he had donated blood and his HBsAg was negative at this time. thank you for guiding me. i will definately tell you about his dna report and doctors next suggestion. thank you once again.

  34. hello, my boyfriends HBVDNA report says that it is above ie >170000000 and log value not aaplicable. his fibroscan result is median stiffness -9.9 kPa and IQR 1.4 kPa. ultrasound is normal. after this result doctor said that his liver has no significant damage . he again gave test for SGOT,SGPT, Billirubin and albumin . i think its LFT test again. he said after this he will decide whther patient should go for medications. he didnt suggest HbeAg test . what are your interpretions? i am confused . please help me to make clear picture about his stage. thank you.

    1. Hello: Your boyfriend obviously has a high viral load, however whether he requires treatment depends on his ALT/SGPT level. If he is in the immune-tolerant stage, with high viral load and normal ALT levels (and usually being HBeAg-positive), he may not be a candidate for treatment. However, if his ALT is elevated (above 30 for men), then he may be a candidate for treatment. He should have a discussion about treatment and his condition with his doctor once the latest ALT test results are back. Thank you.

  35. hello,
    my boy friend has high viral load ie above 170000000 and his ALT is 72. doctor here in india suggested to start treatment . he has prescribed TENVIR (tenofovir) for three months , dosage once a day after meal. whats is your opinion about this? is it necessary that he should take this medicine at particular time everyday? i mean if he takes medicine at 2pm after lunch, is it very necessary to maintain this time during course? or is it ok if he takes medicine few minutes( say half and hour more or less) before or after particular time? thank you .

    1. Hi: I’d try to aim for the same time every day when taking pills. Usually one takes an antiviral for an extended period of time — months and even years. It’s unusual to take an antiviral for only three months, so keep this in mind too. Good luck.

    2. Hello: Tenofovir is a very effective antiviral against hepatitis. Usually, you take antivirals for many months or years, and not just three months. We suggest he take the daily pill at the same time every day, it will help him remember to take it. The drug company recommends, “If you forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember, providing it is within the next 12 hours. If it is more than 12 hours later when you remember, skip the missed dose but remember to take your next dose when it is due. Do not take two doses together to make up for a forgotten dose.”
      Good luck.

  36. Hi

    I am waiting on test results to see if I have any of the virus’s. I am very worried as contracting this possible virus’ was a one time inexcusable mistake. I have a two year old son, and currently residing with family. I worry everyday that if infected that I will pass this onto my son of my family I love.

    In mid Nov ocontactyear is when my possible interaction happened with an infected partner. I have no visable signs other then a tinge of yellow/brown tinge that is showing on the inside of both my eyes near my nose. One eye has more yellow/brown tinge then other side. This discoloration was noticed by family member around Christmas time, which would only roughly be a month later or possibly less time then that. I have read that very few people show any signs at an early stage. And I am just curious if I am showing already the jaundice affects at such an early stage, does that mean I have a more serious condition of the virus compared to the acute virus that can possibly overcome before the 6 month period; or can the jaundice signs be because of my prior habbits of not eating healthy and having a high intake of fatty foods and greasy foods and red bull that has already affected my liver, to be that quickly affected by possible jaundice.

    It’s now the first week into February, and no other symptoms have shown, including no yellowing of the skin, and eyes have stayed exactly the same with the yellowish brown tinge remaining the same size and located in same spot. Obviously the wait time for everyone is hard, but I hope answers can help determine the possible outcome before the results come in.

    I am also curious if I should be highly worried about my sons possible contact as he has accidentally drank out of my glass I had drank from, and that his father (also possibly infected) has shared gum unknowing with him. What measures can I take medically to ensure my two year old son has and will not contract this virus? I have taken measures of not sharing anything with anybody, and continuously washing and disinfecting my hands, and disinfecting the toilet seat and handle after every use. Is there any other precautionary measures I can take? Or any signs to watch for in my young son?

    I also routinely go for full std testing through my life, and have always had negative results, so prior infection of this virus is absolite, as I have read it can take up to 3 months for antibodies to show in tests. My last tests in October prior to this horrible mistake showed negative, but nurse did mention that my body was showing low immunity to the hep virus as my hep vaccines showed little detection in my system in January when I went to get retested. Hep a&b vaccine was administered at this time. Wondering if getting this vaccine will have any assistance with allowing my body to fight off possibly infection if taken after possible exposure, or if there is anything medically from a doctor I should be requesting to help ensure the virus is overcome before becoming chronic hepatitis.

    Also curious, which may be a uncommon question, but I am curious is it common to have teeth problems from hepatitis, as through this possible infection I have had a tooth pulled due to it cracking, which is the first and only tooth I have had this happen with, and just today my mother tooth completely came out. I understand that age can be a factor, but I worry that possible infection to her may be the cause since its only been two weeks from my broken tooth. It may only be a coincidence, but again I fear the possible infection for her.

    I thank you for your time, and eagerly await for any guidance.

    1. Hello: In most cases, people have no symptoms from hepatitis B, and I have not heard of it causing any dental problems. Also, when healthy adults are exposed to the virus, it can take up to six months for their immune systems to clear the virus. When people are vaccinated, their hepatitis B antibody level can decline over time, that is natural, however their immune system usually retains a “memory” of the virus and is able to guard against infection.
      It is not possible to transmit hepatitis B through sharing food, drinking out of the same glass, or kissing. Please practice safe sex, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes to protect your health. So make sure you are getting tested. Good luck.

  37. Hello,

    Thank you for your woderful service. I had two exposures, one 0n dec 25th 2015 and other on feb 5 2016..I tested negative after 12 weeks for hbsag and anti-hbc Igm after the last exposure in feb. Are these tests conclusive. I have read online that i need to wait 6 months.does the rule apply to hbsag test as it is one of the earliest markers.

    Thanks
    Vicky

    1. Hello: Twelve weeks is long enough to determine if you were infected or not. Six months is how long it takes the body to clear the virus after a healthy adult is infected. Good luck.

  38. I was diagnosed of HBV five months after unprotected sex, my worries is how is it possible for me not to have had the symptoms until this long Time? Though my symptoms have abated,this 120 days on lamivudine, I hope to test by July to know my status.

    1. Hello: It can take several weeks or months for the virus to replicate and produce enough virus to affect your liver and cause symptoms. Hepatitis B infection doesn’t happen overnight, it takes time for the virus to replicate and generate enough antigens to be picked up by a lab test. Many people never experience any symptoms at all. Good luck, I hope your next test shows you have cleared the infection.

  39. my boyfriend has chronice hep b …..before 6 months his viral load was >170000000 . he is on tenofovir . recently his HBVDNA report says that his viral load is 674 and log value is 2.83. doctor says its good and he should continue tenofovir for next six months. can you make me understand his report? 674 IU/ml and log value 2.83 means what? waiting for your reply. thank you

    1. Hello: It is not unusual for someone in the immune-tolerant stage (usually in their teens, 20s or 30s) to have a very high viral load, even in the millions or billions. Tenofovir is a potent antiviral that makes it hard for the virus to replicate, which is why his viral load dramatically dropped down to 674 IU/mL, which is very good news. Hopefully this will decrease any liver damage and make his blood and body fluids (semen) less infectious. I hope you are immunized and practice safe sex. Good luck.

  40. How will I know if I have recovered? Is the symptoms not supposed to clear completely or is it lamivudine that is messing around with my Body? Is HBV a barrier to IT employment as I will be going for job medical.

    1. Hello: You are considered to have cleared hepatitis B if you develop at least 10 mIU/mL of hepatitis B surface antibody (HBsAb). If you had a chronic infection and now have undetectable viral load (HBV DNA), and test negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and have no signs of liver damage for at least three years in a row, doctors also consider you to have cleared the infection.
      A hepatitis B infection should not prohibit you from any job. Sadly, some countries in the Middle East and Central Asia prohibit people with hepatitis B from performing certain jobs. There is no medical basis whatsoever for this discrimination. Good luck.

  41. I have maintained normal numbers in my blood tests for 6 months now and I eat very healthy, workout , drink tons of water and stay active. Praise Jesus! Here’s the problem/question: I LOVE my craft beer. Is it harmful to have 2-3 beers daily? I hear about drinking moderately but does my drinking constitute moderation?

    1. Hello: I’m sorry to break the news, but having two to three beers a day when you are chronically infected with hepatitis B is not good for your liver health. You may be young and able to get by for the last few months without elevated liver enzymes, indicating liver damage, but alcohol stresses our livers. If you must, an occasional beer may not harm you, three a day is pressing your luck. For more information read: http://www.hepb.org/blog/fun-fireworks-and-alcohol-consumption-over-the-holiday-weekend/
      Good luck.

  42. Hello, sir I found I have hepa b in May 20 2016 my SGOT and SGPT is 58 and 49 and my viral load is 210iu/ml my Hbsag is positive and Hbsag is 0.34 equivalence zone and my ultrasound is normal but now four month later my liver test SGOT n SGPT comes under normal value 28 n 21 my next ultrasound is also show normal but my Hbsag is still showing positive why and how when it comes Hbsag negative . Please help me I shall be very thankful to u……

    1. Hello: It sounds like you are healthy and have “inactive” hepatitis B, given your healthy liver enzyme test and ultrasound results. It is impossible to say if or when you will clear HBsAg. Many people live long and healthy lives with inactive hepatitis B, especially if they take care of themselves and avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and eat healthy foods. Continue to get monitored regularly, you’re doing a great job taking care of yourself. Good luck.

  43. Thanks for your kind info…but I have some other quction that this much low viral load is any indication of acute hepatitis b is it possible that person with low viral load in acute hepatitis b because I have sudden weakness and weight loss in past three month sudden fatigue or its my window period becaus my Hbeag shows 0.34 equivalence zone I found myself positive before 3month only but now am start felling healthy don’t feel any fatigue and stomach blaolting still persist how I get to know am acute hepatitis b carrier. These value are valid for acute hepatitis b or only high viral load is sign of acute hepatitis b thanks

        1. Hello: Because it takes around six months for the immune system to get rid of a hepatitis B infection. You may not get an accurate reading after just four months. Thanks.

  44. Hello…thanks for all info sir but is it possible that Hbsag is still showing positive after four month from initial infection with virus and how virus come out from body is it by urination,sweat,saliva,sweat secreation and Hbeag 0.34 it’s equalvocul zone is it called window period

    1. Hello: It can take around six months for the immune system to clear hepatitis B, which it does by creating antibodies to destroy the hepatitis B antigens and through T-cells that attack the hepatitis B-infected liver cells. The body naturally expels the remnants of the virus and infected liver cells. Keep getting monitored and consulting with your doctor over the next few months to make sure your body has cleared the infection. Good luck.

  45. Ok…what it mean that virus infection is in blood not in liver means what this interpretation that virus is in your blood not in liver its means someone is infected with hepa b virus getting recovered or cured ??

  46. Sir I only have dark yellow urine in the morning than slowly it turns lighter n lighter than its turns transparent for further day why…?

  47. Hello, I’m a little bit confused.
    I’ve been experiencing symptoms since the 2nd week of August. At that time I didn’t know if they’re hepatitis b symptoms. And on 29 August, i was tested HbsAg positive.

    Since I didn’t know when I got infected, how do I know my HbsAg has cleared after 6 months?
    From the first time the virus entered my body?(which I don’t know when)
    From the time I felt symptoms?
    From the time the symptoms subsided?
    Or from the time when my lab tests shown? (HbsAg on 29 August, anti HBc IgM on 1 September)

    Thank you

    1. Hello: Because you can’t pinpoint exactly when you were infected, the best thing to do is to get tested six months after your first positive hepatitis B test. If you were recently infected and have a healthy immune system, your body should clear the infection and you should test positive for hepatitis B surface antibodies (anti-HBs) in six months. If you were infected at birth or during early childhood, you may have a chronic infection. If you continue to test positive in six months, then get your liver enzyme (ALT/SGPT) blood test done to determine if you are experiencing any liver damage. After that, get tested regularly. In the meantime, eat healthy foods, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, practice safe sex, and encourage your family to get tested and vaccinated. Good luck.

  48. Hello,

    I had my first unprotected sex January 2016 and second August 2016, I never heard of hepatitis until last week when my mum made it compolusory that my siblings and i ran the test, all my sister tested negative and was the only positive amongst them. My question is can a hepatitis B profile test show if i’m acute or chronic? Second, for me to be infected does it means one of my two sexual partner semen or sperm was ejactuated into me (im was always scared of getting pregnant so i never allowed them cum inside me)? Third question,if i actually got it from my January encounter shouldn’t my immune system have fought the virus? Third question is, if finally i’m an acute carrier, can the viral loads and the daily usage of my drugs clear the infection? I’m so scared because i applied to a school and they will make me take a complusory test. Also, January this year i was diagonsed of Chamlydidas which i cleared 1 months after. I need your advice please as i can’t share this depressing issue with anyone, my mum has been extremely supportive. Thank you.

    1. Hello: There is no way to know if you were recently infected or if were infected at birth or during early childhood until you have been tested over a six-month period. If you still test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) after six months, it means you were infected during childhood and have a chronic infection.
      Unfortunately, there is no cure for hepatitis B, but if you experience liver damage from hepatitis B, there are very effective antiviral treatments that can lower your viral load and reduce your risk of liver damage.
      Good lucki.

  49. Hi I have been diagnosed of acute hapitatis b (inactive) this month and my one year old boy is negative but my partner is positive but active. That this means I contracted it after birth? And will my son be positive if I had it b4 birth?

    1. Hello: When healthy adults are infected with hepatitis B, they are usually able to clear the infection over a six-month period. This is called an acute or short-term infection. It is impossible to know if someone has an acute or chronic infection, which lasts longer than six months, until they are tested over a six-month period. If they continue to test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) for longer than six months, it means they were probably infected at birth or during early childhood and have a chronic infection.
      If your 12-monthy-old son has tested negative for hepatitis B (which is wonderful), it may mean you became infected after his birth. Has he been vaccinated? If he hasn’t please get him vaccinated as soon as possible, and get yourself tested again in six months. Good luck.

  50. Hello,
    I just want to know, if someone is infected with both hiv and hepatitis b, will he be able to live long?
    Is it true that even with effective treatment, he will surely progress to ESLD? Or even die because of IRIS, liver toxicity, or drug resistance?
    I am just anxious. Thank you for the response

    1. Hello: Being coinfected with HIV and hepatitis B is challenging. However, there are very effective drugs for HIV today, and some of those antiviral drugs (such as tenofovir) are also effective against hepatitis B. It is very important to find a doctor who has experience treating both conditions. Usually, infectious disease doctors treat HIV and gastroenterologists or hepatologists treat hepatitis B. Make sure the doctor is familiar with both infections and knows how to treat them in a coinfection situation. For more information please see: http://www.hepb.org/what-is-hepatitis-b/hivaids-co-infection/ Good luck.

  51. Hi what does being inactive means? Thus that mean it has been there for long and can never be cleared even though you have not been through your six months?

    1. Hello: Having “inactive” hepatitis B means your immune system is strong enough to suppress the infection and the virus to very low levels. Generally, your viral load (HBV DNA) is low or undetectable, and you have no signs of liver damage, as indicated by an ultrasound or a blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). It is a good thing to have an “inactive” infection that is not harming your liver.
      Unfortunately, only a small percentage of people are able to completely clear hepatitis B, even after a long period of having an “inactive” infection.
      Even though your infection is “inactive” and your liver is healthy, it is still important to continue to be monitored in order to catch any problem that can arise. And of course avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and eat healthy foods. Good luck.

  52. Recently I have been diagnosed with infective hapetitis, which was acute and had little sign of hapa B
    Now in the last lab test found out bilirubin count is still high doctor has suggested me to cure jaundice.
    How could anybody suffer hapa B first and then sign of joundise

    1. Jaundice is caused by elevated bilirubin levels. It can take a while for these levels to build. Plus in general, there are few symptoms with HBV and it can take time for the onset of symptoms. Be sure to discuss your situation with your doctor and be sure you are being carefully monitored and that you clear your HBV infection. A person is considered cholerically infected if they continue to test HBsAg positive for longer than 6 months.

        1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. When someone is first infected with hepatitis B, it is considered an acute infection. Most healthy adults who are acutely infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg after 6 months, it is considered a chronic infection. Knowing whether your hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
          Good luck.

  53. Let me clarify. I tested positive on 7th July. Due to panic, i was started on texavir on 8th July. On 12th July i had a viral load test. It was 816 iuml. I continued on texavir for one month. The doctor i next saw stopped it (around 12th august. I was pot on simarine apparently for supportive care. This i took for one month (September) after that i stopped since i could not afford. I took another viral load test on 1st November and it reads <20 iuml. Am i recovering. What are my chances. Thanks alot

    1. Hello: It is a good thing that you continue to be undetectable (less than 20 IU/mL) for viral load (HBV DNA) even after you stop tenofovir. Antivirals work for only as long as you take them, so your latest test shows that your immune system is able to reduce viral load on its own.
      Was July the first time you were tested for hepatitis B (HBsAg)? You may have been recently infected and had an acute or short-term infection. When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. When someone is first infected with hepatitis B, it is considered an acute infection. Most healthy adults who are acutely infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg after 6 months, it is considered a chronic infection and you may have been infected at birth or during childhood.
      Knowing whether your hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
      Please get tested again six months after your first test to see if you are acutely or chronically infected. If you are still infected, make sure your doctor monitors you liver health through blood tests for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). Good luck.

      1. Yes, the July test was my first and 816 iuml was my first viral load. About two months later, that is, late October, i took another viral load test, (until then i was on no medication except that i was taking warm lemon water every morning). The viral load read <20iuml. I am also quite sure that i didn't have hepatitis b a as a child. Upon my first testing positive of Heb.b, i had experienced all the named symptoms, which is what prompted me to test, having previously associated the illness to malaria. But which, because all treatment with antimalarials had failed, prompted me to test for hepatitis b as it is currently an epidemic in my area of Uganda. Note also that my liver ultrasound on 15 July was normal. Strangely also, until then, that is the month of July, i used to fall sick of malaria nearly after every month, however ever since the hepatitis b attack, until now, i have not. How does this explain. Thanks alot again.

      2. Yes, the July test was my first. I am also quite sure that i didn’t have hepatitis b a as a child. Upon my first testing positive of Heb.b, i had experienced all the named symptoms, which is what prompted me to test, having previously associated the illness to malaria. But which, because all treatment with antimalarials had failed, prompted me to test for hepatitis b as it is currently an epidemic in my area of Uganda. Note also that my liver ultrasound on 15 July was normal. Strangely also, until then, that is the month of July, i used to fall sick of malaria nearly after every month, however ever since the hepatitis b attack, until now, i have not. How does this explain. Also, my symptoms have been slow resolving, but as of now, although i feel entirely well, i occasionally, rarely feel pain near my liver area, and even more rarely now although frequent in the past, hot flashes around my neck. Thanks alot again.

        1. Hello: I am glad the symptoms are subsiding, please get tested again six months after your first test to see if the infection has cleared. I am not aware of any interplay between hepatitis B and malaria that would result in a reduction of recurrent malaria symptoms. Good luck.

  54. I recently took some drugs for toothache, including amplicox ,felvin and Flagin… I suffered serious upper abdominal pain till I stopped. Yesterday, I was to donate blood ad I was told I am hep B+, I was asked to go for confirmatory tests. Am sexually active and my wife went for hepB test and was told negative. Could my test be wrong?

    1. Hello: It is difficult to tell. Your reaction to your medication may be simply a coincidence with the timing of your hepatitis B test. To make sure, please get tested again for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in six months. If this next test is positive or reactive, it means you are currently infected. If you are, you should get your liver enzymes (ALT or SGPT) also tested to see if the infection is harming your liver.
      Was your wife also tested for the hepatitis B surface antibdoy (anti-HBs or HBsAb)? If she tests positive for surface antibodies, it means she either has been exposed to the infection in the past and developed immunity or she was vaccinated in the past.
      Good luck.

    1. Hello: Nearly all people who were healthy adults when they were infected are able to clear the infection. And a small percentage of people who are chronically infected with hepatitis B are also able to clear the infection, most often as they get older and lose the hepatitis B surface antigen.
      Also, researchers predict they will be able to find a cure for hepatitis B in the next few years. We are hopeful! Good luck.

  55. Hello, i’ve had a serious problem with alcohol for the last 3 years and abdominal pains for 3 (which i assumed and continue to assume were/are alcohol related). I was tested for everything 3 months after my last ‘encounter’ with someone and it was all negative two years ago. I was just about to become involved with someone and thought of getting tested just to prove i’m clean yet somehow i’ve got an isolated hbcab result. I have since changed my diet, stopped drinking alcohol and am taking vitamins aswell as having limited exercise. I generally feel drowsy and think i have a slight yet constant fever.

    I guess my questions are:

    1 While i am scheduled for a follow up test, what is your opinion and advice?.

    2 If it’s chronic which seems unlikely, is there any chance however remote, of me one day resolving it anyway?.

    3 How effective is the vaccine in preventing the people close to me getting it?. For example if they get the vaccine can i just go about my life like nothing has changed?.

    4 If i clear the infection, do i still retain an increased risk of liver related issues due to having the infection in the first place?.

    1. Hello: You indicated you’ve tested positive for the core antibody (HBcAb), which means you were infected at some point in the past. Do you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)? If so, that means you continue to be infected. That should be part of your follow-up tests, including getting tested for the surface antibody (anti-HBs).
      A chronic hepatitis B infection is when you test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months. That is the time it takes for a healthy adult to clear the infection if they were recently infected.
      The vaccine is very safe and effective. It is administered in three doses over a six-month period. Once someone is vaccinated and has generated at least 10mIU/mL of surface antibodies, they are considered protect from infection.
      If you have cleared the infection and test positive for the surface antibody, then you do not face any liver damage risk from infection. However, alcohol abuse and other substances can continue to hurt the liver.
      Good luck.

      1. Hello again and thanks for the answers!

        Since you asked my first results were:

        HBsAg Negative
        HbsAb Negative < 10 UI/L
        HbcAb Positive
        HbeAb Negative
        HVCIgG Negative

        Not really sure what to make of it since i haven't been close to anyone in 3 years and was tested 3 months after that contact.

        1. Hello: You were infected at some point, your immune system is working to clear the infection, as indicated by your negative HBsAg test result, which is excellent news. Good luck.

    1. Hello: A healthy adult immune system takes on average six months to clear the virus following infection. Symptoms may not appear until a few weeks after infection. Good luck.

      1. But my question is lets say for example once you get symptoms and you go to the doctor and they tell you have an acute infection do the six months start their?

        1. Hello: Yes, even though you were undoubtedly infected earlier than that, usually doctors will test you six months after your first positive test. Good luck.

  56. Sir what do you think about new medicine coming to cure hepatitis b properly for life time what about that research for biriapant when this silly disease eridicate what our doctors do? Where the human trials happen? Is this true that the cure is really near or is this a myth for all people doctors or for our govt also just for making people fool only please reply me as soon as possible thanks…..respected sir

  57. Hi
    I HBV carrier from 2003 at age of 23,now iam 35,hight165cm,Weight 62,I am doing excersise regularly now my health condition is good,i taking LFT test every six months from 2003,
    The reports shows normal,Iam a non drinker,but from last month I started taking one beer per a week.its advisable or not pls tell.
    Pls advise good diet for me.

    1. Hello: As you mentioned, your hepatitis B appears to be “inactive,” which means it is causing no liver damage, and you are leading a healthy lifestyle. Drinking one beer each week is unlikely to cause liver damage, but it’s important to be honest with yourself. Is it really only one beer? And if you drink one beer, does your resistance weaken and do you end up having a second one or more? It is important to know yourself and what happens when you drink. For more on navigating social situations when you don’t drink, please read: http://www.hepb.org/blog/navigate-disclosure-denial-drinking-hepatitis-b-holidays/
      Good luck.

  58. Sir I only have dark yellow urine in the morning than slowly it turns lighter n lighter than its turns transparent for further day why…?

    1. Hello: It might be because your urine has sat collecting in your bladder for a longer time at night, versus during the day when you’re drinking liquids and urinating more frequently. If you suspect you have hepatitis B, please see your doctor and get tested. Good luck.

  59. Hi..
    I been diagnosed with hep B again for the second time.. I don’t understand this how I can be diagnosed for the second time where in I was cured in 4 months earlier and that was 6 years back.. what should I do please suggest.. as currently I am married with a kid but my wife and kid are hep B free…

    1. Hello: When you supposedly were cured, did you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antibody (antiHBs) or did you just test negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)? When we have “inactive” hepatitis B, and our immune system is doing a good job suppressing the virus and keeping it from multiplying rapidly, and we can test negative for HBsAg. In the U.S., labs test for a certain level of HBsAg, and if it drops below that level, they consider that you have tested negative for it. Your HBsAg levels may have dropped below that threshold, and now they’ve inched up and now are detectable again. Make sure your liver enzymes (ALT/SGPT) are monitored to find out if you have any liver damage, and make sure your wife and children are immunized in the event your viral load increases again. Good luck.

    1. Hello: Unfortunately, women infected with hepatitis B almost always transmit the infection to their babies, but you can prevent this by making sure your baby is vaccinated with the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine within 12 hours of birth. This is an important way to stop the mother-to-child infection cycle. Depending where you live, if HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies) is available, your baby should also receive a dose of HBIG.
      If you can, it is important to get your viral load (HBV DNA) tested. If your viral load is very high, exceeding 200,000 IU/mL, then your doctor may want to treat you with the antiviral tenofovir during your pregnancy to lower your viral load and further reduce the risk that your baby will be infected. Please email me at chris.kukka@hepb.org if you have additional questions. Good luck.

    1. Hello: Currently there is no cure for hepatitis B, and herbal supplements such as dandelion and lemon will not make the infection go away.
      The National Institutes for Health has published fact sheets on various herbal supplements, the home page is at: https://nccih.nih.gov/health/herbsataglance.htm, where you can look up the safety and effectiveness of many herbal treatments.
      Please keep in mind that herbal remedies and supplements are not regulated so you don¹t really know for sure what is in them, and that the contents could change from one bottle to the next.
      The other problem with herbal remedies in general is there is typically NO evidence (no clinical trials or data) to back up a claim for a cure, which is why the NIH fact sheets are so valuable.
      We at the foundation cannot recommend any claims for a cure that are not backed by scientific data or endorsed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Sometimes, supplements and remedies can harm the liver more than help it.
      I would encourage you to discuss the use of these herbal remedies or supplements with your liver specialist, along with learning more about your HBV and liver health. I would also encourage you to focus adopting healthy lifestyle choices which go a long way towards maintaining the health of your liver. Good luck.

  60. Three months ago, I was told by my doctor that I have successfully cleared the Hep B virus, but my test results indicated the presence of the virus was “detected but below quantifiable levels”. That reading makes me nervous. I want to trust my doctor, but how can I be sure the virus is truly gone? I asked about getting tested again but he told me it was not necessary. However, lately I seem to be feeling a small amount of fatigue and even think I can see a slight tinge of yellowing towards the back of my eyes. Could I have a chronic condition regardless of what he told me?

    1. Hello: A person is considered to have cleared hepatitis B if they test negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and positive for the hepatitis B surface antibody (anti-HBs). Ask your doctor for the test results for those two tests.
      Also, you should have achieved an undetectable viral load (HBV DNA). Contact your doctor, tell him about your symptoms, and review the test with him or her. This is your body and your health, and you have a right to understand your test results. Good luck.

  61. Based on what I could see of the results, I tested negative for the surface antigen and positive for the surface antibody, but the viral load was “detectable but below quantifiable levels.” Again, this is confusing to me. Can the virus return?

  62. Hello hepbtalk

    Firstly thank you for all your time and this thread. You’re really making a big difference for all of us. Recently diagnosed with acute hepatitis b I was given ursodeoxycholic acid tablets to take twice daily from the liver specialist. I feel fine but do have dark urine and occasionally mild tiredness. He also explained most people get over this naturally but I’m confused that I seem to be the only one prescribed medication. After two weeks I came in for a blood test check up and my doctor said my readings were very high and I needed to be hospitalised immediately fearing I had liver failure. I felt fine but was scared so i agreed to it. I was put on n-acetylcysteine iv drip for two days. They checked my blood and cleared me to leave but my doctor has now added n-acetylcysteine tablets to my treatment so I need to take these 2 medicines for my acute hepatitis b. Can you please advise what your thoughts are on this treatment. I keep searching the Internet and no one seems to be on the same or similar treatment I am. Plus the mention of liver failure has me concerned.

    Thanks again for your time and effort
    Abbey

    1. Hello: I am confused about your treatment. Are you sure you have hepatitis B? N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a drug that prevents liver damage from toxic exposures, such an overdose of acetaminophen (the active ingredient in pain relievers like Tylenol). Please continue to follow your doctor’s orders and take whatever medication has been prescribed to reduce your liver damage. Good luck.

  63. Hello,

    I was positive for hbsag, hep be ag, and the igm antibody for the past 5-6 months but most recent tests results are as follows

    HEPATITIS B SURFACE ANTIBODY QL= NON-REACTIVE
    HEPATITIS BE ANTIGEN = NON-REACTIVE
    HEPATITIS BE ANTIBODY = NON-REACTIVE
    HEPATITIS A IGM = NON-REACTIVE
    HEPATITIS B SURFACE ANTIGEN = NON-REACTIVE
    HEPATITIS B CORE ANTIBODY (IGM)= NON-REACTIVE
    HEPATITIS C ANTIBODY =NON-REACTIVE

    My doctor had said it takes time for the body to make the antibody. most of the time like 3-6 months for the antibodies to show up on the blood test. And now that my body had cleared the infection that it should start making the antibodies. Does that sound right to you? Any advice would be greatly appreciated

    1. Hello: I agree your test results are confusing, but clearing hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is definitely reason to celebrate, even in the absence of the surface antibody. Your doctor is correct, it can take time for antibodies to multiply and get picked up by lab tests. Please continue to get monitored, and good luck.

      1. Thank you very much for the reply back. Really appreciated all the information that you have given. You are doing a great thing helping answer all these questions. Keep up the good work

  64. I have one more question if you don’t mind? Do you think there is any chance of it being chronic or dormant? Since the antibodies showed non-reactive. Or do you think it’s probably just taken time for the antibodies to show up on the test results? Would really appreciate any information you could give.

    1. Hello: There is no way to tell how an infection evolves other than waiting and getting monitored regularly. It can take a while for antibodies to show, every immune system is different. We hope for the best outcome. Take care.

  65. Hello Sir thanks for all your you are doing here . I got tested for Hbv in 2014 after giving birth to my son. My son tested Negative and my husband Negative. I started taken some herbal treatment of which the doctor told me that my viral load is reducing. I wasn’t feeling any symptoms at all or getting sick .i travelled abroad in 2015 and stopped taking this herbal treatment. In feb 2017 while pregnant for my second child I got tested positive for HBV . I experienced some symptoms for some weeks but later after taking Turmeric, Beets roots and other herbs with strictness in my diet I feel very okay. I am currently taking Black seeds and honey and eating mostly vegetables and olive oil. My question is what is my chances of clearing this virus. I intend to do a test after 3 months to determine the viral load.Would I have a chance to clear this virus ?

    1. Hello: There is no cure for hepatitis B, and no herbal supplement or special foods have been found to get rid of the virus. Please follow a healthy diet, get monitored regularly, and make sure your newborn is immunized within 12 hours of birth with the first dose of the hepatitis B vaccine, and given a dose of HBIG (hepatitis B antibodies). Have you had your viral load (HBV DNA) measured? If you have a high viral load, (above 200,000 IU/mL) your doctor may recommend you take an antiviral during the last half of your pregnancy to lower your viral load and further lower the risk of infecting your baby. Good luck.

  66. I understand that if you don’t clear the virus after 6 months it becomes Chronic HBV. But can move from been Chronic to Acute HBV

    1. Hello: The word “acute” describes a short-term hepatitis B infection, or a reactivation of a chronic infection. For example, if you are newly-infected and have a healthy immune system, you usually experience an acute infection and within six months your immune system clears the infection. You lose the hepatitis B surface antigen and develop surface antibodies.
      If you have had chronic hepatitis B (lasting for several years), and had no signs of liver damage and a low viral load, and suddenly were exposed to some toxin or took an immune-suppressing drug, your “inactive” hepatitis B would reactivate and your viral load and liver damage would suddenly increase significantly. That can be also called an acute reactivation. It describes a short-term worsening of your symptoms. Hope this helps, good luck.

      1. Thanks for your kind response. There might be no scientific cure for this Terrible Virus but God is my sole and only healer . I believe and I trust in his healing power . I will put everything in his hand .Hope to come back here and share my testimony when I get completely cured. Thanks once more

  67. I just got diagnosed of hbsag+ and the doctor confirm it’s acute my alt reading is 14 I haven’t been able to concentrate since then and am 21yrs

    1. Hello: No doubt this was very disturbing to learn about your hepatitis B.
      When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Most healthy adults who are infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. This is called an acute infection.
      However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it is considered a chronic infection. It means you were probably infected at birth or during early childhood, when your immature immune system could not fight it.
      Knowing whether your hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. Please get tested again in six months to find out if it’s chronic or acute. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
      Good luck.

  68. Hi Hepbtalk,

    Firstly thanks for answering all these replies, it is educational having a read through. Just a couple of questions for you:

    – I have been diagnosed with acute Hep B (I didn’t have it when tested in October, and have just tested positive in March). I have also read a lot about Hepatitis C, and want to know if I have both. Would this have been picked up in my initial test (at a sexual health clinic) or should I ask for a separate test? And do I need one?

    – My doctor ran some liver tests and the scores were SGOT: 76, ALT 108. Looking at other people’s scores on this page, they seem quite high. Are these very high by your understanding? Do they mean it is more or less likely it becomes chronic HBV? Or could they have been caused by other factors? (i.e. I had to take a lot of ibuprofen recently for pneumonia. I also drink and take drugs (in moderation, infrequently)).

    Apologies for all the questions and thanks.

    Best wishes,

    Dimensions

    1. Hello: Good questions. First to address your hepatitis B. If you were recently infected, it can take about six months for your immune system to clear the infection, as long as your immune system is healthy. It is not unusual to have above normal ALT levels during an acute infection. Your immune system is attacking the hepatitis B-infected liver cells, which causes the liver damage and above-normal ALT levels (which should be below 30).
      It is very important that you do not drink or smoke, as this can weaken your immune system and your liver, especially if you recently had pneumonia. Also, if you must use a painkiller, ibuprofen is preferred to Tylenol or acetaminophen, which is processed by the liver.
      If you were not tested for hepatitis C, we recommend it as part of a general physical exam, including getting an HIV test.
      Keep getting your liver enzymes (ALT) monitored in the months ahead, and make sure you get tested for HBsAg and HBsAb (surface antigens and antibodies) six months after your first positive test.
      Please take care of your health, you’ve been through a lot with pneumonia and now hepatitis B. Good luck.

  69. Hi HepBtalk, thanks for all your answers on my questions on other thread, tho I still have lots of question running on my mind about HBV, since I’m newly diagnosed I thinks it is the proper thread.

    On March 4, 2017 I was tested positive for HBSAg, My doctors first impression by doing some interviews and some physical exams he said that I’m good and I’m ‘healthy carrier’ and said that it will be chronic (maybe since I never know when do I get this)

    last March 6, I was tested for
    SGPT/ALT = 38
    HVB DNA = 12,414 (seems a quite high for me).
    After giving him the results he finalized that I’m healthy carrier tho I think HBV DNA is quite high base on my readings about HBV on the internet. When you say ‘healthy carrier’ does it mean that the patient is ‘Healthy’ at one point and maybe not for another 6 months then treatment is needed? My doctor also said that HBV DNA reaches hundred of thousands to millions and mine was too low for treatment. Can I also be positive for HBEAg bec of my high viral load? thanks again 🙂

    1. Hello: Please keep getting monitored so you and your doctor can look for any changes in viral load (HBV DNA) and your liver health (SGPT/ALT). And of course eat healthy foods and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

  70. Hi I was tested for HBV and after eaten healthy and and staying on a strict diet I decided to go for another test . I requested another test after one month to know the Viral Load I was give a result as follows Hypetitis B Posive 5367 COI what does this means please reply and thanks

    1. Hello: I am not sure that I understand your report, but it might mean 5,367 copies per milliliter (copies/mL)? If that is the case, your viral load is fairly low. Please keep eating healthy foods, practice safe sex, avoid alcohol, and get tested again to find out if your infection is acute or chronic. We wish you good luck.

  71. Hi, I was diagnosed today by HBc AB positive, HIV Ab/ Ag (negative) HCV Ab(negative) HBs Ag (negative), HTLV Ab (negative) IgG, IgM (negative) i just need to know more explanation about this because as per my doctor i was infected before but now it’s gone and no need for me to consult doctor. Can you please check what HBc AB positive means?

    1. Hello: Your doctor is correct, your hepatitis B core antibody test shows you have been infected, but your negative hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) test result shows you are no longer infected. Congratulations! Good luck.

      1. Thanks for replying for my email. So is there any chance that I can get it again or my body can no longer have that kind of infection in the future? or do I need to try to have some test after 6 months just to make sure that everything is alright with my body?

        1. Hello: As long as you have at least 10 mIU/mL of hepatitis B surface antibodies, you have cleared the infection and do not have to be retested in six months. Good luck.

    2. Hello: Your doctor is correct, your positive hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb) test result shows you were infected at some time in the past, however the fact you test negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) shows you have cleared the infection and are immune to hepatitis B, which is excellent. Congratulations.

  72. Pls I am confused I was tested negative 3years ago but just yesterday I was tested positive.I had hepatitis B 7years ago but did not know until after 4years battling.can I still get over it or not and what could cause its reoccurence

    1. Hello: Keep in mind that not everyone with hepatitis B requires treatment, many people live long and healthy lives with hepatitis B. Generally, medical guidelines recommend treatment only if you are experiencing liver damage. This is indicated by an ultrasound and a simple blood test for the liver enzyme ALT (also called SGPT). Our liver cells release ALT when they are damaged or die. Healthy ALT levels for men are up to 30, and for women they are up to 19. Please consult with your doctor and see what your ALT levels are to determine if you require treatment.
      If you ever do, there are two very effective antiviral medications that are recommended: tenofovir (Viread) and entecavir.
      Please get monitored at least once a year, avoid alcohol and cigarettes and practice safe sex. Good luck.

  73. Hello,

    I have really appreciated this thread for helping people living with Hepatitis B.

    Recently my girl friend tested Hepatitis B Positive and i am scared to hell. I suspect i may have been infected around 17th February 2017 the only time i had live sex and thereafter infected my girl freind who only had sex with me twice after my infection.

    Currently i have no any symptoms BUT i have stopped drinking alcohol, no meat, no smoking, no sex and fatty meals and every morning i drink BEETROOT, CARROT, LEMON, HONEY, GINGER, GARLIC mixed juice and go to the GYM thrice a week.

    Do you think such a life style may help my immune system to fight off acute Hepatitis B and i do not develop a chronic infection since i have been well with no identifiable health issues. I am greatly scared.

    Thank you.

    1. Hello: Do you mean you had unprotected sex with your girlfriend even though you have hepatitis B without first make sure she was vaccinated against the liver infection?
      I am having difficulty understanding your question, has she been tested for hepatitis B? And, is she infected or has she been vaccinated.
      Before you have sex, even using condoms, you must disclose your hepatitis B status to your sexual partner, otherwise you endanger her health. Please read: http://www.hepb.org/blog/romance-in-the-air-take-a-deep-breath-and-disclose/
      If you are infected with hepatitis B, you must get monitored regularly, eat healthy food, which can include low-fat meat, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes. Good luck.

      1. Hello! Can you please post some sources or statistics which prove that drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes during acute hepatitis has any effect on a person’s ability to clear the virus? I understand that alcohol and cigarettes are generally not good for the liver (over a LONG period of time), but seriously, how much damage can they do in only a few months of a hepatitis infection?

        Thank you!

        1. Hello: Your liver is required to work harder to process alcohol, if it’s already fighting an infection, it’s going to be less able to clear the infection effectively. Here are some stats in terms of smoking:
          Among people who have been infected by the virus, it appears that non-smokers are more likely to clear the infection and develop surface antibodies on their own than are smokers.
          “… researchers identified 132 people who had been infected, evidenced by the presence of the hepatitis B core antibody. Only 44 (33.3%) of these infected patients cleared the infection and developed surface antibodies. The researchers found that HBV-infected cigarette smokers had much lower rates of clearing the infection than non-smokers.
          “These data suggest that surface antibody development, either naturally or after vaccination, is significantly lower among smokers,” they wrote. The study underscores the importance of measuring surface antibody levels in smokers following immunization to see if adequate protective levels of antibodies have developed, and whether a booster vaccine is required to confer protection against the infection.” Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed
          /25714135

  74. Hi doc. What is the remission in hepatitis B
    . Does remission means the infection is chronic or acute. One do one really ensure that they are acute and not cronic

    1. Hello: Doctors do not usually use the term “remission” with hepatitis B. During a hepatitis B infection, you either have a short-term or acute infection or a long-term or chronic infection.
      When healthy adults are infected, their immune systems are able to recognize and successfully fight the infection, usually clearing it within six months. This is an acute infection.
      When newborns or young children are infected, their immature immune systems don’t immediately recognize the infection and the infection sets up shop in the liver and it can last for years and even decades.
      To find out if you have a chronic or acute infection, you need to be tested for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) over six months. If you continue to test positive for HBsAg after six months, it means you have a chronic infection. Good luck.

      1. Thanks Doc, I really appreciate your response. Some people wrote on forum here that it took them over 7 to 8 months to cure and get rid of their Acute Hepatitis b. How is that possible since you said once it 6 months one becomes a cronic carrier of hep b?

        1. Hello: Medical guidelines historically have used the six-month mark to assess if a hepatitis B infection is chronic or acute. However, medicine can be an inexact science and how rapidly you clear HBsAg during an acute infection may depend on the strength of your immune system.
          Good luck.

  75. I’m 32yr old man. I started getting symptoms around late feb 2017- like loss of appetite, fatigue, feel like vomiting whenever I perceived food aroma, dark yellow urine and tarry stool. I thought it was just a fever or malaria. I used some Malaria drugs but no changes after 3days, then I decided to go for a general test and got diagnonized hep b positive. I used to be a heavy drinker (alcohol) but now have stopped and waiting to come out negative. I was placed on diet for 17days, no cooked food but just fruit, veggies, ginger and garlic along with some herbal medicines and my symptoms disappeared. I feel so much healthier than before and gained more appetite. My last ALT/AST test shows 50 and 51 which has reduced. My total bilirubin tested 1.0 Direct bilirubin tested 0.3 Alk phos – 102. Total protein – 7.4. Albumin- 4.5. Liver measures 128. I was worried if I’m a chronic carrier or acute, then I had my mom got tested and she came out negative. My genotype is AA, blood group is O+. It’s been just 2months now. Hope there’s a sign or possibility that have not been infected from childhood or from birth. Thanks

    1. Hello: We hope it’s acute too, but you will have to wait to get tested six months after your first positive HBsAg test to find out if it’s chronic or acute.
      Congratulations on avoiding alcohol, which would be dangerous on top of hepatitis B. Stick with healthy eating and avoid cigarettes. Good luck!

      1. Well I believe if I’m a chronic carrier, my liver would have been seriously damaged by now and probably would have gotten ciirhosis because I used to be a heavy drinker, along with smoking weed, have been drinking heavily for the past 16yrs now. I used to drink to stupol and have never had any symptoms of liver problem until I started getting body resistance to acohol since 2014 which has drastically limit my drinking habit and I was also recently diagnonized with a pelvic ulcer, occult blood stool, and urine infection but thank God I got rid of those ones now. My last test showered everything is normal, besides my ALT/AST and HBsAG +. My question is if someone have been infected from childhood or birth, can he or she consume the way have consumed alcohol for the past 16yrs and liver will still be functioning well till now without any treatment? Is that possible ? Hope to hear from you soon again. Thanks.

  76. Hi, I am recently diagnosed with hbsag
    Reactive but when I donated blood last 2012 I have it already, so I think I had a chronic hepa b. Now I try to clear it by taking turmeric tea with raw honey, because someone recommended it for me, by then I am taking it for almost 1 month. Is there a chance that I can clear it in one month? It makes me cry when it was detected on me when I have my medical test for working abroad. Thank you for listening and I am hoping for good response….

    1. Hello: Unfortunately, there is no cure for hepatitis B, including tumeric tea and raw honey. There are antivirals that will lower your viral load and reduce your risk of liver damage, but there is no drug that will make your hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) disappear, which is what some countries use to unfairly discriminate against people with hepatitis B.
      Please take care of yourself, get monitored regularly, avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and practice safe sex. Good luck.

  77. Hello Doc,

    My new result shows my ALT is 106 and the LAB range is 50% my AST is 37 and the LAB range is 50/edl AND my GGT is 138. Please tell me, is this number too high?please tell me if from this numbers if one is acute or chronic. I have not been taking medicine yet. are these numbers too high ? is it likely an indication for chronic hep B or moderate to assume one is acute since i not taking any medication yet?

    1. ….can i also start taking tenofovir without doctor recommendation as delays in seeing doctors is taking time. again my ALT is 106 and my AST 50? please do answer my both messages and questions. thanks

      1. Hello: We do not recommend you take antivirals without a prescription from your doctor. Your doctor may want to perform additional testing, including for hepatitis D, before prescribing medication. Good luck.

  78. Hi again Hepbtalk,

    Seems like a long time after my first message on March 20th. I had some symptoms including headaches, abdominal pain and dark urine – no jaundice. Now they all seem to have cleared, apart from slight abdominal discomfort sometimes.

    Am I now cleared of the virus, or do I still need to get checked up? I tested positive in mid March

    1. Hello: The only way to determine if you have cleared hepatitis B, is to get tested again six months after your first test. If you test negative for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and positive for the surface antibody (HBsAb), you have cleared the infection. Good luck.

  79. EDIT.. Today the abdominal pain came back, big time. Urine is back to normal and no headaches. What I’m thinking now is that I’ve my immune system had fought off most of the symptoms, but the liver pain remains, meaning that it is probably chronic… Is this assesment probable?

    Many thanks

    1. Hello: Only tests performed six months after your first positive test for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) can determine for sure if your infection is acute or chronic. Be patient and take care of yourself. Good luck.

    2. Hello: Only a test at six months will determine if you have chronic or acute hepatitis B. Good luck.

      1. Hi Hepbtalk,

        Quick question – what is your position on smoking cigarettes in low quantities while with acute Hepatitis B? Is it as bad as alcohol consumption?

        Thanks,

        D

        1. Hello: Smoking, even in “moderation” stresses your immune system and forces your liver to process the toxic byproducts. If you can, stop smoking. If you can’t smoke as little as possible. Please see about local smoking cessation classes to help. Good luck.

  80. Hello Doc,

    RESEND:

    My new result shows my ALT is 106 and the LAB range is 50% my AST is 37 and the LAB range is 50/ Please tell me, is this number too high or normal ? please tell me if from this numbers if one is acute or chronic. I have not been taking medicine yet. are these numbers too high ? is it likely an indication for chronic hep B or moderate? what would be your professional assumption about my case

    can i also start taking tenofovir without doctor recommendation as delays in seeing doctors is taking time.

    1. Hello: When our liver cells are damaged, they release the enzyme ALT into the bloodstream. Normal or healthy ALT levels, according to your lab, is 50. Your ALT is 106, which indicates liver damage.
      I assume from your message that this is an early test, and you have not been tested for hepatitis B over a six-month period to determine if you have a chronic or acute infection.
      Your doctor is not recommending treatment until he/she knows if this is a chronic or acute infection. During an acute infection, it is not unusual to have ALT levels above normal as your immune system attacks the infected liver cells. Also, your ALT level is not dangerously high, so your doctor is taking a cautious approach.
      Please wait until you are retested in six months, if you remain infected (and positive for HBsAg), talk to your doctor about what your ALT levels are and if treatment is needed. Good luck.

  81. Hi. I have done following tests post exposure:
    Hbsag -8 week and 12 week -negative
    Hbsab – 12 week – negative
    Hbcab, total – 12 week- negative. I got these tests done in india. Should i be worried to retest at 6 month ?

    1. Hello: According to the CDC, after exposure to the virus HBsAg will be detected in an infected person’s blood an average of 4 weeks (ranging from 1–9 weeks). If after 12 weeks you still test negative, then rest easy, you are definitely not infected and do not need to be retested. Good luck.

  82. hi doctor . please help me to understand my situation. i never had any history of hep b. not even in my family. i was tested positive

    21 oct 2016 first time.. HBsAg reactive , Hbeag negitive. AlT 39.

    14 feb 2017 : HBsAg reactive , Hbeag negitive. AlT 57, Afp: 9.4, hbvdna :25 iu/ml

    1/may/2017:HBsAg reactive , Hbeag negitive. AlT 49 , Afp: 9.4 …
    i am not a heavy drinker. drink twice or thrice in a month . i was told that virus will go away on its on. but it still reactive. i know i was never infected before . i was infected sometime last year. can acute hep b take more than six months to resolve.. ?
    i never feel any symptoms except itching or rashes..it goes away after i take Cetirizine . can i still recover from this virus. i am really worried . will i die soon if i am chronic…please answer me..

    1. Hello: You are unlikely to die from hepatitis B. Your ALT (liver enzymes) are a bit elevated (healthy ALT levels are under 19 for women and under 30 to 40 for men.) Yes, a hepatitis B infection can last longer than six months.
      I recommend you continue to be monitored, eat healthy foods, and avoid alcohol and cigarettes.
      Is there any chance you have fatty liver (if you are overweight?) That can worsen hepatitis B and also cause increases in ALT. Good luck.

      1. yes i am bit overweight and casual drinker,, i have left drinking now… i think my liver is bit fatty that could be a reason for high alt. can you suggest me something that could help to clear up virus . i do drink lots of water and been drinking green tea and turmeric tea as well. is there anything you can suggest me please . thanks

  83. Greetings
    I was recently diagnose with hepatitis b,2016 test result was negative.here are my result so confusing
    29/03/2017
    Hbsag +
    Hbsab –
    Hbeag +
    Hbeag +
    Hbcab +
    Sgpt 38
    Sgot 29
    Second test result
    1/05/2017
    Hbsag +
    Hbsab –
    Hbeag +
    Hbeab +
    Hbcab –
    Sgpt 19
    Sgot 38
    I can’t interpret it please help

    1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Your HBsAb negative tests shows your immune system hasn’t generated enough surface antibodies yet to eradicate the surface antigen.
      In both tests, you tested positive for both the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) and the “e” antibody (HBeAb). This suggests your immune system is producing “e” antibodies, but they haven’t had the numbers yet to eradicate or clear out the “e” antigen. Basically, they’re tied right now.
      The core antibody (HBcAb) result also means you have been infected in the past, don’t worry that it later tested negative.
      Your SGPT result identifies a liver enzyme that liver cells release into the bloodstream when they are injured. Normal or healthy SGPT levels range up to 19 in women and up to about 30 to 40 in men (see what range your lab identifies as normal or healthy.) Your SGPT level has decreases (which is a good thing) from 38 in March down to 19 in May, which is good news.
      If your March tests was the first time you have ever tested positive for hepatitis B, you will have to be tested again in six from that date to find out if this is a new/acute infection that will disappear in six months, or whether this is a chronic infection that infected you during early childhood.
      Good luck.
      You must get tested again in six months to find out if this is a new or acute infection, or if you were infected during early childhood and have a chronic or long-term infection. If you continue to test positive for HBsAg, you should also get a test to see if you have experienced any liver damage. Good luck.

  84. Hello all! I’d just like to share my recent experience with HBV. I was infected with this disgusting virus by having unprotected sex with a stranger. 2 days after being infected, my face began to flush and heat up. It continued like this for approximately 10 days. On the 10th day, I was tested for all STD’s via Labcorp (including HBV cAB), and all results were negative. On the 20th day, I was again tested for all STD’s, including HIV RNA, and once again all results were negative. On the 25th day after exposure, my abdomen began feeling pain, and I was told by a doctor a few days later that my liver was slightly enlarged! Finally, after almost 3 weeks of abdominal pains, a week of horrifying looking bowel movements, and one morning of dark brown urine, I ordered an Acute Hepatitis panel from Labcorp, and sure enough, Hepatitis B Total Core Antibodies were detected, but Surface Antigen was negative! A week later, I went to Labcorp again for HB sAB blood test, and it was positive! Finally! Relief!!! Apparently, my immune system was able to clearthe virus within 8 weeks of becoming infected…all while drinking heavily and chain smoking (because I never was sure I had it until the antibodies were detected). Now I’m not saying that this is the way to clear a Hepatitis infection, but I’m naturally a heavy drinker anyways, and there was no way I could have stopped drinking, even in a situation such as this! I consider myself EXTREMELY LUCKY that I was able to clear this infection so early, and I feel very bad for people who have to go through months of mental agony in hopes they’ll clear this nasty virus! With all of this said, the CDC and the WHO claim HBV symptoms show up no earlier than 1 month, but this incorrect, and I have the documentation to prove it, so would it be worth the effort to inform these organizations that HBV symptoms can appear earlier than they’d once thought?

      1. Thank you for replying! So it has been 1 week since I discovered HB Surface Antibodies appeared, and I’m still experiencing abdominal aches (not severe) on both sides of my abdomen by my lower rib cages. Is this normal? How long will these aches persist? They’re only noticeable when I sit down, but they do cause me some concern. Thank you once again!

  85. Please can a Child contact Hepatitis B after childhood vaccine against Hepatitis B. If yes, when can a child be vaccinated again to avoid the virus.

    Please if one is vaccinated, is he/she covered for life? if not, how many years does it take for one to be re-vaccinate. Thanks

    1. Hello: The hepatitis B vaccine protects more than 90% of all infants, children and adults who receive the three-dose vaccine. The immunization provide lifelong protection. However, if your child is living in a house with someone who has hepatitis B, it’s always advisable to get him or her tested to make sure they have at least 10 mIU/mL of hepatitis B surface antibodies. Good luck.

  86. Hi, what does this result mean?
    HBcAb +
    HBcIgM –
    HBsAg +
    HBsAb –
    HBsAb value = 0.00 mIU/ml
    HBeAg –
    HBeAb +
    Viral DNA 2216 IU/mL

    1. Hello: When we are infected with the hepatitis B virus, we test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). We also test positive for the hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb).
      Another of the viral antigens that labs test for is the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg). As our immune systems start to fight the infection, they produce antibodies to get rid of the hepatitis B antigens. It’s a good sign to test negative for the hepatitis B “e” antigen (HBeAg) and positive for the hepatitis B “e” antibody (HBeAb).
      Your viral load (called HBV DNA or viral DNA) is 2,216 IU/mL, which is moderate.
      Is this the first time you have been tested for hepatitis B? To know if you were recently infected and have a short-term “acute” infection, you need to be tested again in six months.
      Also, have your had a liver function test to see if the infection is harming your liver? Ask your doctor about a blood test for the liver enzyme ALT/SGPT or AST.
      Good luck.

  87. Hi I’m an acute carrier of hepatitis b is it OK I take lime, herbs concoction and blackseed? You are doing a great job may ALLAH reward you.

    1. Hello: Herbal supplements have not been found to be effective in protecting the liver or treating hepatitis B. However, spices, herbs and fruit in general will not harm you. The best thing to do is avoid alcohol and cigarettes, and eat a well-balanced diet and get monitored regularly.
      Were you recently found to be infected with hepatitis B (testing positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen)? To find out if you have an acute infection or a chronic one, you must be tested again in six months.
      Good luck.

  88. Hi, on Friday I tested negative to HBV, and the doctor said my liver levels look normal.

    As I am in a foreign land, can anyone (Hepb Talk) with knowledge in this area confirm the following levels are normal?

    TP – 7.0
    Albumin – 4.3
    Globulin – 2.7
    D Bil – 0.28
    T Bil – 1.0
    SGOT (AST) – 22
    SGPT (ALT) – 24
    ALP – 51

    Many thanks

    1. Hello: It appears your liver enzyme tests (ALT and AST) are all within normal/healthy range, which is to be expected if you are healthy and do not have a liver infection.
      Good luck.

    2. Hello: I will address your liver enzyme ALT/SGPT which at 24 is healthy and does not indicate liver damage. Good luck.

  89. i was diagnosed with hepatitis a and hepatitis B my results read as

    Hep A Ab, Total Positive Range-Negative
    Hep B Core Ab, IgM Negative Range-Negative
    Hep B Surface Ab, Qual- Non Reactive

    can someone please tell me what this means, I am not understanding for it does not look like any other test that I have researched on the internet. I don’t understand if its really acute, left my body already. I had a scan of my liver abdomen and pancreas they were fine!

    1. Hello: Your results show you have never been infected with either hepatitis A or hepatitis B. If you had, you would have tested positive for the hepatitis A antibody (Hep A Ab) or the hepatitis B core antibody.
      You need to be vaccinated against both hepatitis A and B to protect you from infection.
      Your negative result for the hepatitis B surface antibody shows you have not been vaccinated.
      Good luck.

      1. Thank you for this information. Im going to get a second opinion. They are telling me at my Dr’s office that I am in the acute stages of Hepatitis with these results.

  90. I asked a question a few days ago and I put everything tat i saw from the test in this message. what exactly does this mean because the drs office is still trying to tellme that i am positive for acute hepatitis.

    Hep A Ab, Total Positive
    Hep B Core Ab, IgM Negative
    Hep B Surface Ab, Qual- Non Reactive

    1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Most healthy adults who are infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. This is called an acute infection.
      However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it is considered a chronic infection. It means you were probably infected at birth or during early childhood, when your immature immune system could not fight it.
      These tests show you were infected in the past with hepatitis A, but have cleared the infection, and you have not yet cleared your hepatitis B infection and developed hepatitis B surface antibodies.
      The only way to find out if you have an acute or chronic infection, is to get tested again in six months. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
      Good luck.

  91. Hello sir. I was tested and dey said am hep B positibe and i dont drink alcohol nor cigrate at all. All i dont feel any sign of infection you listed. Run morr than 2km everyday. I dont feel any pain in me. Is that a sign of acute.

    1. Hello: Hepatitis B is called the silent infection because in most cases it does not cause any symptoms and many people don’t know they have been infected.
      Our livers have very few sensory nerves around them, so we don’t feel it when a liver is infected with hepatitis B. And most people with hepatitis B live long and healthy lives, so it’s not unusual that you can be physically active, especially given that you are taking good care of your health.
      Good luck, please get tested again in six months to find out if your hepatitis B is chronic or acute.

  92. Am 21yrs now. I was tessted for hep B positive hbs ag is positive hbs ab is positive. Does dat mean it is cronic or acute. Can it affect me in joing soldier thank u

    1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Most healthy adults who are infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. This is called an acute infection.
      However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it is considered a chronic infection. It means you were probably infected at birth or during early childhood, when your immature immune system could not fight it.
      Knowing whether your husband’s hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. Please make sure you are tested again in six months to find out if it’s chronic or acute. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
      Every country has different requirements concerning hepatitis B and serving in the military. Unfortunately, many countries including the United States current prohibit people with hepatitis B from joining the military. Please read more on this at: http://www.hepb.org/blog/time-end-militarys-ban-enlistees-hepatitis-b/
      Good luck.

  93. A herbalist gave me some medicine which include honey and garlic. Which he told me i shold drink it for one month and the only solution is to avoid oil and protein so from that time i now stop feeling tired and dizziness with some head ache is that herbalist really make sense

  94. Mine is
    HBs Ag: reactive
    hBs Ab: non reactive
    Hbe Ag: non reactive
    Hbe Ab: reactive
    Hbc: ab reactive
    is it acute or chronic thank you sir. But i dont smoke nor drink alcohol

    1. Hello: When you test positive or reactive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Most healthy adults who are infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. This is called an acute infection.
      However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it is considered a chronic infection. It means you were probably infected at birth or during early childhood, when your immature immune system could not fight it.
      Knowing whether your husband’s hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. Please make sure you are tested again in six months to find out if it’s chronic or acute. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
      Also, please get tested in six months for liver damage. This is a blood test for the liver enzyme ALT/SGPT.
      Congratulations on avoiding cigarettes and alcohol. Please eat healthy foods and make sure your family is tested for hepatitis B and vaccinated if needed. Good luck.

  95. hi sir/mam
    i am from new zealand and i never had any history of hep b because i did get negitive test in 2015 and also donated blood few times so i was never told that i have any infection. last year in 21/10/2016, i had to go for medical test because of immigration stuff. i was told that i am positive in HBsag. i wasnt aware about hep b. i went for another test HBeag negitive ,alt 39 ,afp 9.1 .
    another test done in 14/02/2017 where i was HBsag positive , hbeag negitive ,alt 57 ,afp 9.2, hbvdna 25uml.
    i was told that it could be acute and i should get re tested again. so i tested in 1/may/2017 where Hbsag positive ,alt 49,Hbeag nrgitive.
    then i consulted with hep b specialist here in nz. he saw my results and told me that i might be chronic hepb state but he is not sure . he also said that it could be acute as well. my doctor also assured me that i wont require any treatment now and chances for spreading virus is very low. He also said that no treatment will be required for future as well. so can you please give me some idea about my condition. what do you think about my doctor’s advise. please help me.. many thanks

    1. Hello: When you test positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAG), it means you are currently infected with hepatitis B. Most healthy adults who are infected are able to get rid of the virus on their own within six months. This is called an acute infection.
      However, if you continue to test positive for HBsAg for longer than six months, it is considered a chronic infection. It means you were probably infected at birth or during early childhood, when your immature immune system could not fight it.
      Knowing whether your hepatitis B is acute or chronic will help you and your doctor determine your next steps. Please get tested again in a few months to find out for certain if it’s chronic or acute. If you are unsure of what your blood test results mean, please visit: http://www.hepb.org/prevention-and-diagnosis/diagnosis/hbv-blood-tests/
      Also, you can still spread hepatitis B through unprotected sex and direct contact with your blood or body fluids, so make sure your family is tested and vaccinated against hepatitis B.
      One last thing, your ALT (liver enzyme) levels are slightly elevated, indicating minor liver damage. Please continue to be monitored, as you may require treatment one day, and of course avoid alcohol and cigarettes.
      Good luck.
      Good luck.

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